Scientific American

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 7911

Monthly magazine devoted to topics of general scientific interest.

A.I. and Genius Machines

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466833815

Category: Computers

Page: 50

View: 975

A.I. and Genius Machines by the editors of Scientific American In science fiction, artificial intelligence takes the shape of computers that can speak like people, think for themselves, and sometimes act against us. Sometimes the machines seem to know everything, and symbolize implacable and unknowable power, as in The Matrix. Such machines can also embody the limits of logic, and by extension our own powers of reason. In Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey, HAL was a computer of vast capability driven insane by the demands of his programming – to honestly and completely report information – when those instructions conflicted with orders to keep state secrets. Star Trek has given us the android, Lieutenant Commander Data, who strives to be more human. None of these visions came true in quite the way science fiction writers imagined, even though in many ways computers surpass their fictional counterparts. This eBook reviews work in the field and covers topics from chess-playing to quantum computing. The writers tackle how to make computers more powerful, how we define consciousness, what the hard problems are and even how computers might be built once the limits of silicon chips have been reached. Artificial intelligence also raises some thorny ethical questions, such as whether morality can be programmed. These are kinds of issues that make artificial intelligence and computing fascinating. Building an intelligent machine brings together the human desire to create and the question of what makes us what we are. If anyone ever builds a true thinking machine, that last question becomes much more complicated, not less. Data and HAL would probably agree.

Beyond Extreme Physics

Author: Scientific American,Rosen Publishing Group

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781404214026

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 7060

Collection of articles examining some of the latest work in the understanding of physics, including black holes and string theory.

The Higgs Boson

Searching for the God Particle

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466824131

Category: Science

Page: 231

View: 4303

The Higgs Boson: Searching for the God Particle by the Editors of Scientific American Updated 2017 Edition! For the fifth anniversary of one of the biggest discoveries in physics, we’ve updated this eBook to include our continuing analysis of the discovery, of the questions it answers and those it raises. As the old adage goes, where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where there is effect, there must be cause. The planet Neptune was found in 1846 because the mathematics of Newton's laws, when applied to the orbit of Uranus, said some massive body had to be there. Astronomers eventually found it, using the best telescopes available to peer into the sky. This same logic is applied to the search for the Higgs boson. One consequence of the prevailing theory of physics, called the Standard Model, is that there has to be some field that gives particles their particular masses. With that there has to be a corresponding particle, made by creating waves in the field, and this is the Higgs boson, the so-called God particle. This eBook chronicles the search – and demonstrates the power of a good theory. Based on the Standard Model, physicists believed something had to be there, but it wasn't until the Large Hadron Collider was built that anyone could see evidence of the Higgs – and finally in July 2012, they did. A Higgs-like particle was found near the energies scientists expected to find it. Now, armed with better evidence and better questions, the scientific process continues. This eBook gathers the best reporting and analysis from Scientific American to explain that process – the theories, the search, the ongoing questions. In essence, everything you need to know to separate Higgs from hype.

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

How Neuroscience, Brain-Machine Interfaces, Neuroimaging, Psychopharmacology, Epigenetics, the Internet, and Our Own Minds are Stimulating and Enhancing the Future of Mental Power

Author: Judith Horstman,Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470602812

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 2186

This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you'll explore: How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are helping the deaf hear, the blind see, and the paralyzed communicate. How our brains can repair and improve themselves, erase traumatic memories How we can stay mentally alert longer—and how we may be able to halt or even reverse Alzheimers How we can control technology with brain waves, including prosthetic devices, machinery, computers—and even spaceships or clones. Insights into how science may cure fatal diseases, and improve our intellectual and physical productivity Judith Horstman presents a highly informative and entertaining look at the future of your brain, based on articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, and the work of today’s visionary neuroscientists.

Scientific American Science Desk Reference

Author: Scientific American

Publisher: Wiley

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 704

View: 1584

Who names newly discovered planets? What exactly are black holes? Where are there the most earthquakes? When did the first Homo sapiens walk the earth? Why is the night sky dark? How does the fluoride in toothpaste prevent cavities? Since 1845, Scientific American has answered questions and provided the best information available in all areas of science. Now, Scientific American is proud to present an accessible, one-volume reference covering all the sciences. Whether you want to examine the tiniest microbes, the properties of the earth's core, or the farthest reaches of space, this handy desk reference is the resource to turn to for the answers you need. * Over 500 biographies of key science figures * Thousands of glossary terms * Hundreds of useful Web sites * Tables, charts, diagrams, and illustrations * Sidebars featuring fascinating facts, mnemonic aids, and quizzes * Essays exploring ideas in-depth

The Scientific American Healthy Aging Brain

The Neuroscience of Making the Most of Your Mature Mind

Author: Judith Horstman,Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118234642

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 2941

Good news about getting older from Scientific Americanand Scientific American Mind The Scientific American Healthy Aging Brain taps into themost current research to present a realistic and encouraging viewof the well-aged brain, a sobering look at what can gowrong––and at what might help you and your brain stayhealthy longer. Neurologists and psychologists have discovered theaging brain is much more elastic and supple than previouslythought, and that happiness actually increases with age. While ourshort-term memory may not be what it was, dementia is notinevitable. Far from disintegrating, the elder brain can continueto develop and adapt in many ways and stay sharp as itages. Offers new insights on how an aging brain can repair itself,and the five best strategies for keeping your brain healthy Shows how older brains can acquire new skills, perspective, andproductivity Dispels negative myths about aging Explores what to expect as our brains grow older With hope and truth, this book helps us preserve whatwe’ve got, minimize what we’ve lost, and optimize thevigor and health of our maturing brains.

Ultimate Physics

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466859040

Category: Science

Page: 170

View: 8428

The fundamental outlines of the physical world, from its tiniest particles to massive galaxy clusters, have been apparent for decades. Does this mean physicists are about to tie it all up into a neat package? Not at all. Just when you think you’re figuring it out, the universe begins to look its strangest. This eBook, “Ultimate Physics: From Quarks to the Cosmos,” illustrates clearly how answers often lead to more questions and open up new paths to insight. We open with “The Higgs at Last,” which looks behind the scenes of one of the most anticipated discoveries in physics and examines how this “Higgs-like” particle both confirmed and confounded expectations. In “The Inner Life of Quarks,” author Don Lincoln discusses evidence that quarks and leptons may not be the smallest building blocks of matter. Section Two switches from the smallest to the largest of scales, and in “Origin of the Universe,” Michael Turner analyzes a number of speculative scenarios about how it all began. Another two articles examine the mystery of dark energy and some doubts as to whether it exists at all. In the last section, we look at one of the most compelling problems in physics: how to tie together the very small and the very large – quantum mechanics and general relativity. In one article, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow argue that a so-called “theory of everything” may be out of reach, and in another, David Deutsch and Artur Ekert question the view that quantum mechanics imposes limits on knowledge, arguing instead that the theory has an intricacy that allows for new, practical technologies, including powerful computers that can reach their true potential.

Scientific American The Amateur Astronomer

Author: Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470351136

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 7671

From the longest running column in Scientific American's history comes this collection of fascinating projects for amateur astronomers For over seventy years, "The Amateur Scientist" column in Scientific American has helped people explore their world and make original discoveries. This collection of both classic and recent articles presents projects for amateur astronomers at all levels. Hands-on astronomy fans will find how to build inexpensive astronomical instruments using ordinary shop-tools. From making a telescope to predicting satellite orbits to detecting the chemical composition of faraway stars, this book has something for everyone interested in practical astronomy.

Understanding Artificial Intelligence

Author: Editors of Scientific American,

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 075952761X

Category: Computers

Page: 160

View: 3044

Drawn from the pages of Scientific American and collected here for the first time, this work contains updated and condensed information, made accessible to a general popular science audience, on the subject of artificial intelligence.

Understanding Child Development

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466858990

Category: Psychology

Page: 334

View: 1438

How exactly do children become the adults they were meant to be? In this eBook, Understanding Child Development, we investigate this profoundly complicated process from infancy through early childhood (the teenage years will be covered in a separate eBook). Included in this collection are several seminal studies on infant cognition where researchers found evidence that many of our abilities are "pre-programmed." For example, in "The Visual Cliff," Eleanor Gibson explains her findings that most human infants are able to judge depth as soon as they can crawl, suggesting that we are born with an ability to perceive falling-off places without having to go through the trial-and-error process. Section 2 looks at how we learn to communicate using both symbols and language. Judy DeLoache's story, "Mindful of Symbols," examines the process that toddlers must go through to learn to discriminate between an object and a representation of that object, such as a photograph. With the ability to communicate comes social development, covered in Section 3. In it, Melinda Wenner Moyer argues that play time is essential for healthy social adjustment in "The Serious Need for Play," while Stefanie Reinberger discusses the link between temper tantrums and violent tendencies later in life in "Tempering Tantrums." The fourth section focuses on developmental disorders, from ADHD to Down syndrome, autism and less common diseases that are linked to faulty genomic imprinting, discussed in a piece by Melinda Wenner Moyer called "A Patchwork Mind." Finally, we end with a section on parenting, which includes a Q&A with noted anthropologist Sarah Blaffer Hrdy on the evolutionary lessons of motherhood-why cooperative parenting and community-based childrearing is not only better for kids, but essential to their healthy development.

The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain

A 24 hour Journal of What's Happening in Your Brain as you Sleep, Dream, Wake Up, Eat, Work, Play, Fight, Love, Worry, Compete, Hope, Make Important Decisions, Age and Change

Author: Judith Horstman,Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470500514

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 4220

Have you ever wondered what’s happening in your brain as you go through a typical day and night? This fascinating book presents an hour-by-hour round-the-clock journal of your brain’s activities. Drawing on the treasure trove of information from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines as well as original material written specifically for this book, Judith Horstman weaves together a compelling description of your brain at work and at play. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain reveals what’s going on in there while you sleep and dream, how your brain makes memories and forms addictions and why we sometimes make bad decisions. The book also offers intriguing information about your emotional brain, and what’s happening when you’re feeling love, lust, fear and anxiety—and how sex, drugs and rock and roll tickle the same spots. Based on the latest scientific information, the book explores your brain’s remarkable ability to change, how your brain can make new neurons even into old age and why multitasking may be bad for you. Your brain is uniquely yours – but research is showing many of its day-to-day cycles are universal. This book gives you a look inside your brain and some insights into why you may feel and act as you do. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain is written in the entertaining, informative and easy-to-understand style that fans of Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazine have come to expect.

The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex and the Brain

The Neuroscience of How, When, Why and Who We Love

Author: Judith Horstman,Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118109538

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 8183

Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery,or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-oldquestions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstmantakes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organand the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from thebonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, theaffectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in ourlives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how weare born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship ofothers, and how very badly things can go without love. Among thefindings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm makeit healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although thecraving for romantic love can be described as an addiction,friendship may actually be the most important loving relationshipof your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigiousScientific American and Scientific American Mindmagazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, andthe Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controlsour loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep andbasic need for connection.

Physics

New Frontiers

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1250121493

Category: Science

Page: 275

View: 8506

In the world of physics, very little in the universe is what it first appears to be. And science fiction has imagined some pretty wild ideas about how the universe could work – from hidden extra dimensions in Interstellar to life as a mental projection in The Matrix. But these imaginings seem downright tame compared with the mind-bending science now coming out of physics and astronomy, and in this eBook, Physics: New Frontiers, we look at the strange and fascinating discoveries shaping (and reshaping) the field today. In the world of astrophysics, the weirdness begins at the moment of creation. In “The Black Hole at the Beginning of Time,” the authors discuss theories of what might have come before the big bang. Could our 3-D universe have sprung from the formation of a black hole in a 4-D cosmos? The math says: maybe. Later, in “The Giant Bubbles of the Milky Way,” the authors describe massive structures dubbed “Fermi bubbles” at its center – structures that no one noticed until recently. Technological innovations make much of this new science possible, as we see again in “Neutrinos at the Ends of the Earth,” where 5,000-odd sensors frozen deep within a cubic kilometer of ice in Antarctica aim to catch neutrinos in order to study distant cosmic phenomena. Scientists are also dissecting molecules with the most powerful x-ray laser in the world, as explored in “The Ultimate X-ray Machine.” Even our most fundamental notions of what reality is are up for debate, as examined in “Does the Multiverse Really Exist?” and the aptly named “What Is Real?” in which the authors question whether particles are indeed material things at all. While all of this abstraction might seem like a fun exercise in mental gymnastics, living things must also abide by the laws of physics, which, according to “The Limits of Intelligence,” may prevent our brains from evolving further. Then again, as we’ve learned, things could be different than they appear...

Scientific American Boy

Author: A. Russell Bond

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 1557091854

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 320

View: 5309

Published by Scientific American in 1905, the book tells the story of a group of boys who explore Clump Island, a fictional place where boys could be boys. As they explore the island, the young friends are able to test their skills building all kinds of things. As the first in the Scientific American Boy series, this is a collection of science and nature activities for boys told in a fictional story. Includes diagrams and illustrations.

Germ Wars

Battling Killer Bacteria and Microbes

Author: Scientific American,Rosen Publishing Group

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781404214057

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 128

View: 1059

Collection of articles examining some of the latest work in the understanding of bacteria and microbes.

Extreme Physics

Author: Scientific American,Rosen Publishing Group

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781404214064

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 176

View: 624

Collection of articles examining some of the latest work in the understanding of physics.

What Makes a Genius?

Author: Scientific American Magazine

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781404214019

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 111

View: 5878

Collection of articles examining some of the latest work in the understanding of what makes a genius.

Fragile Brain

Neurodegenerative Diseases

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466859083

Category: Medical

Page: 170

View: 2145

Brain disease such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s affect an estimated one in six Americans and are increasing in incidence as the population ages. In this eBook, Fragile Brain: Neurodegenerative Diseases, we examine these and other conditions involving the damage and loss of neurons, including other forms of dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and multiple sclerosis (MS). In “The Seeds of Dementia,” the authors discuss evidence of prions and protein misfolding as a universal culprit in Alzheimer’s and other conditions. Later, two articles by Gary Stix report on ongoing research into a cluster of Columbian families that experience early onset symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Researchers studying the genes and progression of disease in these families hope that results will reveal clues about its course and possible future remedies. In “New Movement in Parkinson’s,” the authors outline abnormal cell behavior and genetic mutations that may be behind the disease. In the study of ALS, Amy Yee examines research into why eye muscles tend to last longer than other motor neurons and what this may mean for treatment. Other pieces look at new lines of inquiry in MS, including why researchers are turning to gray matter, as opposed to white matter, as the starting point for the disease. We wrap up this collection with current preventative measures and treatments that target not only disease pathology, but also lifestyle changes as well. In “A Rare Success against Alzheimer’s,” the results of a large-scale Finnish study provide evidence that choices such as diet and exercise can help prevent cognitive decline. Although this news is far from a cure, forward movement against Alzheimer’s – and neurodegenerative disease in general – is reason for optimism. As research and evidence accumulates, we get ever closer to curative therapies that can halt the debilitation and death of neurons.