The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex and the Brain

The Neuroscience of How, When, Why and Who We Love

Author: Judith Horstman,Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118109538

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 4096

Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery, or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-old questions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstman takes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organ and the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from the bonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, the affectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in our lives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how we are born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship of others, and how very badly things can go without love. Among the findings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm make it healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although the craving for romantic love can be described as an addiction, friendship may actually be the most important loving relationship of your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigious Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, and the Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controls our loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep and basic need for connection.

Scientific American

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 4204

Monthly magazine devoted to topics of general scientific interest.

Home

How Habitat Made Us Human

Author: John Allen,S Allen

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465073891

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 3297

Home is where the heart is. Security, comfort, even love, are all feelings that are centered on the humble abode. But what if there is more to the feeling of being at home? Neuroanthropologist John S. Allen believes that the human habitat is one of the most important products of human cognitive, technological, and cultural evolution over the past two million years. In Home, Allen argues that to "feel at home" is more than just an expression, but reflects a deep-seated cognitive basis for the human desire to have, use, and enjoy a place of one's own. Allen addresses the very basic question: How did a place to sleep become a home? Within human evolution, he ranks house and home as a signature development of our species, as it emerged alongside cooperative hunting, language, and other critical aspects of humanity. Many animals burrow, making permanent home bases, but primates, generally speaking, do not: most wander, making nests at night wherever they might find themselves. This is often in home territory, but it isn’t quite home. Our hominid ancestors were wanderers, too—so how did we, over the past several million years, find our way home? To tell that story Allen will take us through evolutionary anthropology, neuroscience, the study of emotion, and modern sociology. He examines the home from the inside (of our heads) out: homes are built with our brains as much as with our hands and tools. Allen argues that the thing that may have been most critical in our evolution is not the physical aspect of a home, but developing a feeling of defining, creating, and being in a home, whatever its physical form. The result was an environment, relatively secure against whatever horrors lurked outside, that enabled the expensive but creative human mind to reach its full flowering. Today, with the threat of homelessness, child foster-care, and foreclosure, this idea of having a home is more powerful than ever. In a clear and accessible writing style, Allen sheds light on the deep, cognitive sources of the pleasures of having a home, the evolution of those behaviors, and why the deep reasons why they matter. Home is the story about how humans evolved to create a space not only for shelter, but also for nurturing creativity, innovation, and culture—and why “feeling at home” is a fundamental aspect of the human condition.

Scientific American Science Desk Reference

Author: Scientific American Magazine,Scientific American

Publisher: Turner Publishing Company

ISBN: 9781620457184

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 1062

Who names newly discovered planets? What exactly are black holes? Where are there the most earthquakes? When did the first Homo sapiens walk the earth? Why is the night sky dark? How does the fluoride in toothpaste prevent cavities? Since 1845, Scientific American has answered questions and provided the best information available in all areas of science. Now, Scientific American is proud to present an accessible, one-volume reference covering all the sciences. Whether you want to examine the tiniest microbes, the properties of the earth's core, or the farthest reaches of space, this handy desk reference is the resource to turn to for the answers you need. * Over 500 biographies of key science figures * Thousands of glossary terms * Hundreds of useful Web sites * Tables, charts, diagrams, and illustrations * Sidebars featuring fascinating facts, mnemonic aids, and quizzes * Essays exploring ideas in-depth

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

How Neuroscience, Brain-Machine Interfaces, Neuroimaging, Psychopharmacology, Epigenetics, the Internet, and Our Own Minds are Stimulating and Enhancing the Future of Mental Power

Author: Judith Horstman,Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470602812

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 2081

This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you'll explore: How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are helping the deaf hear, the blind see, and the paralyzed communicate. How our brains can repair and improve themselves, erase traumatic memories How we can stay mentally alert longer—and how we may be able to halt or even reverse Alzheimers How we can control technology with brain waves, including prosthetic devices, machinery, computers—and even spaceships or clones. Insights into how science may cure fatal diseases, and improve our intellectual and physical productivity Judith Horstman presents a highly informative and entertaining look at the future of your brain, based on articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, and the work of today’s visionary neuroscientists.

Scientific Babel

How Science Was Done Before and After Global English

Author: Michael D. Gordin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022600032X

Category: Science

Page: 424

View: 4880

English is the language of science today. No matter which languages you know, if you want your work seen, studied, and cited, you need to publish in English. But that hasn’t always been the case. Though there was a time when Latin dominated the field, for centuries science has been a polyglot enterprise, conducted in a number of languages whose importance waxed and waned over time—until the rise of English in the twentieth century. So how did we get from there to here? How did French, German, Latin, Russian, and even Esperanto give way to English? And what can we reconstruct of the experience of doing science in the polyglot past? With Scientific Babel, Michael D. Gordin resurrects that lost world, in part through an ingenious mechanism: the pages of his highly readable narrative account teem with footnotes—not offering background information, but presenting quoted material in its original language. The result is stunning: as we read about the rise and fall of languages, driven by politics, war, economics, and institutions, we actually see it happen in the ever-changing web of multilingual examples. The history of science, and of English as its dominant language, comes to life, and brings with it a new understanding not only of the frictions generated by a scientific community that spoke in many often mutually unintelligible voices, but also of the possibilities of the polyglot, and the losses that the dominance of English entails. Few historians of science write as well as Gordin, and Scientific Babel reveals his incredible command of the literature, language, and intellectual essence of science past and present. No reader who takes this linguistic journey with him will be disappointed.

The Scientific American Book of Dinosaurs

Author: Gregory Paul

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312310080

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 8031

Collects writings by experts in paleontology, from John Horner on dinosaur families to Robert Bakker on the latest wave of fossil discoveries.

Scientific American

Supplement

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 7044

Ultimate Physics

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466859040

Category: Science

Page: 170

View: 2995

The fundamental outlines of the physical world, from its tiniest particles to massive galaxy clusters, have been apparent for decades. Does this mean physicists are about to tie it all up into a neat package? Not at all. Just when you think you’re figuring it out, the universe begins to look its strangest. This eBook, “Ultimate Physics: From Quarks to the Cosmos,” illustrates clearly how answers often lead to more questions and open up new paths to insight. We open with “The Higgs at Last,” which looks behind the scenes of one of the most anticipated discoveries in physics and examines how this “Higgs-like” particle both confirmed and confounded expectations. In “The Inner Life of Quarks,” author Don Lincoln discusses evidence that quarks and leptons may not be the smallest building blocks of matter. Section Two switches from the smallest to the largest of scales, and in “Origin of the Universe,” Michael Turner analyzes a number of speculative scenarios about how it all began. Another two articles examine the mystery of dark energy and some doubts as to whether it exists at all. In the last section, we look at one of the most compelling problems in physics: how to tie together the very small and the very large – quantum mechanics and general relativity. In one article, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow argue that a so-called “theory of everything” may be out of reach, and in another, David Deutsch and Artur Ekert question the view that quantum mechanics imposes limits on knowledge, arguing instead that the theory has an intricacy that allows for new, practical technologies, including powerful computers that can reach their true potential.

Understanding Supercomputing

Author: Editors of Scientific American,

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 0759527458

Category: Science

Page: 176

View: 8308

In this book you'll discover what constitutes a 'supercomputer', how the supercomputers of today function, how you can make your own computer into a super machine - through networking - and what tomorrow holds in store for computer usage in terms of hardware, software and everyday applications.

What Makes a Genius?

Author: Scientific American Magazine

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781404214019

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 111

View: 3802

Collection of articles examining some of the latest work in the understanding of what makes a genius.

The Scientific American Reader to Accompany Myers

Author: David Myers,Scientific American

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780716724162

Category: Psychology

Page: 432

View: 9325

Hand-picked by David Myers, these 14 classic and current articles provide another tool for enhancing lectures, encouraging discussions, and emphasizing the relevance of psychology to everyday life. Contents 1. Humbled History [Robert-Benjamin Illing] 2. Rethinking the 'Lesser Brain' [James M. Bower and Lawrence M. Parsons] 3. Promised Land or Purgatory? [Catherine Johnson] 4. Music in Your Head [Eckart O. Alternmuller] 5. Sign Language in the Brain [Gregory Hickok, Ursula Bellugi, and Edward S. Klima] 6. Television Addiction is No Mere Metaphor [Robert Kubey and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi] 7. Islands of Genius [Darold A. Treffert and Gregory L. Wallace] 8. Emotion, Memory, and the Brain [Joseph LeDoux] 9. The Tyranny of Choice [Barry Schwartz] 10. The Mind-Body Interaction in Disease [Esther M. Sternberg and Philip W. Gold] 11. Freud Returns [Mark 11. Solms] 12. Manic Depression and Illness and Creativity [Kay Redfield Jamison] 13. Decoding Schizophrenia [Daniel C. Javitt and Joseph T. Coyle, Scientific American] 14. The Science of Persuasion [Robert Cialdini]

Understanding Artificial Intelligence

Author: Editors of Scientific American,

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 075952761X

Category: Computers

Page: 160

View: 7333

Drawn from the pages of Scientific American and collected here for the first time, this work contains updated and condensed information, made accessible to a general popular science audience, on the subject of artificial intelligence.

Current Issues in Microbiology

Author: Scientific American Magazine

Publisher: Benjamin Cummings

ISBN: 9780805346237

Category: Science

Page: 74

View: 2155

This four-color magazine includes eight articles from Scientific American magazine selected especially for students of microbiology. End-of-article questions help students check their knowledge and connect science to society. Answers to the questions appear in the Instructor Resources section of the Microbiology Place Website.

Infested

How the Bed Bug Infiltrated Our Bedrooms and Took Over the World

Author: Brooke Borel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022604193X

Category: Nature

Page: 259

View: 5955

A biological and cultural history of the bed bug explores ongoing scientific discoveries, the advent of DDT, the flourishing emergence of current infestations, the economics of bed bug problems and the ways that bed bugs have inspired art.

The Best of the Best of American Science Writing

Author: Jesse Cohen

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061875007

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 416

View: 5742

For a decade, Ecco has published the most outstanding science writing in America, collected in highly acclaimed annual volumes edited by some of the most impressive and most important names in science and science writing today: James Gleick, Timothy Ferris, Matt Ridley, Oliver Sacks, Dava Sobel, Alan Lightman, Atul Gawande, Gina Kolata, Sylvia Nasar, and Natalie Angier. Now series editor Jesse Cohen invites the previous guest editors to select their favorite essays for this one-of-a-kind anthology. The result is an outstanding compendium—the best science writing of the new millennium, featuring an introduction by the series' 2010 editor and New York Times bestselling author of How Doctors Think, Jerome Groopman.

A.I. and Genius Machines

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466833815

Category: Computers

Page: 50

View: 6814

A.I. and Genius Machines by the editors of Scientific American In science fiction, artificial intelligence takes the shape of computers that can speak like people, think for themselves, and sometimes act against us. Sometimes the machines seem to know everything, and symbolize implacable and unknowable power, as in The Matrix. Such machines can also embody the limits of logic, and by extension our own powers of reason. In Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey, HAL was a computer of vast capability driven insane by the demands of his programming – to honestly and completely report information – when those instructions conflicted with orders to keep state secrets. Star Trek has given us the android, Lieutenant Commander Data, who strives to be more human. None of these visions came true in quite the way science fiction writers imagined, even though in many ways computers surpass their fictional counterparts. This eBook reviews work in the field and covers topics from chess-playing to quantum computing. The writers tackle how to make computers more powerful, how we define consciousness, what the hard problems are and even how computers might be built once the limits of silicon chips have been reached. Artificial intelligence also raises some thorny ethical questions, such as whether morality can be programmed. These are kinds of issues that make artificial intelligence and computing fascinating. Building an intelligent machine brings together the human desire to create and the question of what makes us what we are. If anyone ever builds a true thinking machine, that last question becomes much more complicated, not less. Data and HAL would probably agree.

The Higgs Boson

Searching for the God Particle

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN: 1466824131

Category: Science

Page: 231

View: 8834

The Higgs Boson: Searching for the God Particle by the Editors of Scientific American Updated 2017 Edition! For the fifth anniversary of one of the biggest discoveries in physics, we’ve updated this eBook to include our continuing analysis of the discovery, of the questions it answers and those it raises. As the old adage goes, where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where there is effect, there must be cause. The planet Neptune was found in 1846 because the mathematics of Newton's laws, when applied to the orbit of Uranus, said some massive body had to be there. Astronomers eventually found it, using the best telescopes available to peer into the sky. This same logic is applied to the search for the Higgs boson. One consequence of the prevailing theory of physics, called the Standard Model, is that there has to be some field that gives particles their particular masses. With that there has to be a corresponding particle, made by creating waves in the field, and this is the Higgs boson, the so-called God particle. This eBook chronicles the search – and demonstrates the power of a good theory. Based on the Standard Model, physicists believed something had to be there, but it wasn't until the Large Hadron Collider was built that anyone could see evidence of the Higgs – and finally in July 2012, they did. A Higgs-like particle was found near the energies scientists expected to find it. Now, armed with better evidence and better questions, the scientific process continues. This eBook gathers the best reporting and analysis from Scientific American to explain that process – the theories, the search, the ongoing questions. In essence, everything you need to know to separate Higgs from hype.

The Scientific American Book of Astronomy

Author: Scientific American, inc

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781585742844

Category: Science

Page: 372

View: 2560

Describes recent observations and discoveries in astronomy, including the 1994 collision between Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and Jupiter and a discussion of dark matter and the destiny of the universe.