Searching for Life

The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo and the Disappeared Children of Argentina

Author: Rita Arditti

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520921665

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 5108

FROM THE BOOK:"I want to touch you and kiss you.""You are my mother's sister and only one year older; you must have something of my mother in you."—A found child after being returned to her family Searching for Life traces the courageous plight of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, a group of women who challenged the ruthless dictatorship that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983. Acting as both detectives and human rights advocates in an effort to find and recover their grandchildren, the Grandmothers identified fifty-seven of an estimated 500 children who had been kidnapped or born in detention centers. The Grandmothers' work also led to the creation of the National Genetic Data Bank, the only bank of its kind in the world, and to Article 8 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the "right to identity," that is now incorporated in the new adoption legislation in Argentina. Rita Arditti has conducted extensive interviews with twenty Grandmothers and twenty-five others connected with their work; her book is a testament to the courage, persistence, and strength of these "traditional" older women. The importance of the Grandmothers' work has effectively transcended the Argentine situation. Their tenacious pursuit of justice defies the culture of impunity and the historical amnesia that pervades Argentina and much of the rest of the world today. In addition to reconciling the "living disappeared" with their families of origin, these Grandmothers restored a chapter of history that, too, had been abducted and concealed from its rightful heirs.

Searching for Life

The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo and the Disappeared Children of Argentina

Author: Rita Arditti

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520215702

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 950

"An acute and impassioned observer, Rita Arditti describes Argentina's 'dirty war' years and the heroic struggle of a group of Argentine grandmothers who set out, against all odds, to trace the whereabouts of their disappeared children and grandchildren. Admirably comprehensive, Searching for Life reminds us how ordinary citizens can stand up to tyranny and prevail. Even today, the evidence collected by this tenacious group of detectives has led to the arrest of one of the military junta leaders, General Jorge Videla. The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo are truly the unsung heroes of our time."—E ric Stover, Director, Human Rights Center, University of California, Berkeley "The power of RIta Arditti's Searching for Life lies in its thorough, incontrovertible information, and the irrefutable condition of historical truths. Her book is living, faithful and incorruptible monument that protects us against the dangers of forgetting. Her account is an indispensable weapon for those of us who have been protagonists, and as a way to awaken those who were spectators and those who have opted for the comforts of blindness."—Alicia Kozameh, author of Steps Under Water

Justice in a Time of War

The True Story Behind the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Author: Pierre Hazan

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585443772

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 7461

Can we achieve justice during war? Should law substitute for realpolitik? Can an international court act against the global community that created it? "Justice in a Time of War" is a translation from the French of the first complete, behind-the-scenes story of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, from its proposal by Balkan journalist Mirko Klarin through recent developments in the trial of Slobodan Miloševic. It is also a meditation on the conflicting intersection of law and politics in achieving justice and peace. With insider interviews filling out every scene, Hazan tells a chaotic story of war that raged while the Western powers cobbled together a tribunal in order to avoid actual intervention. The international lawyers and judges for this rump world court started with nothing-but they ultimately established the tribunal as an unavoidable actor in the Balkans. The West had created the Tribunal in 1993, hoping to threaten international criminals with indictment and thereby force an untenable peace. In 1999, the Tribunal suddenly became useful to NATO countries as a means by which to criminalize Miloševic's regime and to justify military intervention in Kosovo and in Serbia. Ultimately, this hastened the end of Miloševic's rule and led the way to history's first war crimes trial of a former president by an international tribunal. Hazan's account of the Tribunal's formation and evolution questions the contradictory policies of the Western powers and illuminates a cautionary tale for the reader: realizing ideals in a world enamored of realpolitik is a difficult and often haphazard activity.

My Name is Victoria

The Extraordinary Story of one Woman's Struggle to Reclaim her True Identity

Author: Victoria Donda

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 159051405X

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 536

Argentina’s coup d’état in 1976 led to one of the bloodiest dictatorships in its history—thirty thousand people were abducted, tortured, and subsequently “disappeared.” And hundreds of babies born to pregnant political prisoners were stolen from their doomed mothers and “given” to families with military ties or who were collaborators of the regime. Analía was one of these children, raised without suspecting that she was adopted. At twenty seven, she learned that her name wasn’t what she believed it to be, that her parents weren’t her real parents, and that the farce conceived by the dictatorship had managed to survive through more than two decades of democracy. In My Name is Victoria, it is no longer Analía, but Victoria who tells us her story, in her own words: the life of a young and thriving middleclass woman from the outskirts of Buenos Aires with strong political convictions. Growing up, she thought she was the black sheep of the family with ideas diametrically opposed to her parents’. It wasn’t until she discovered the truth about her origins and the shocking revelation of her uncle’s involvement in her parents’ murder and in her kidnapping and adoption that she was able to fully embrace her legacy. Today, as the youngest member of congress in Argentina, she has reclaimed her identity and her real name: Victoria Donda. This is Victoria’s story, from the moment her parents were abducted to the day she was elected to parliament.

Revolutionizing Motherhood

The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

Author: Marguerite Guzman Bouvard

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0585281572

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 9309

Revolutionizing Motherhood examines one of the most astonishing human rights movements of recent years. During the Argentine junta's Dirty War against subversives, as tens of thousands were abducted, tortured, and disappeared, a group of women forged the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo and changed Argentine politics forever. The Mothers began in the 1970s as an informal group of working-class housewives making the rounds of prisons and military barracks in search of their disappeared children. As they realized that both state and church officials were conspiring to withhold information, they started to protest, claiming the administrative center of Argentina the Plaza de Mayo for their center stage. In this volume, Marguerite G. Bouvard traces the history of the Mothers and examines how they have transformed maternity from a passive, domestic role to one of public strength. Bouvard also gives a detailed history of contemporary Argentina, including the military's debacle in the Falklands, the fall of the junta, and the efforts of subsequent governments to reach an accord with the Mothers. Finally, she examines their current agenda and their continuing struggle to bring the murderers of their children to justice.

The Reappeared

Argentine Former Political Prisoners

Author: Rebekah Park

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813568560

Category: Social Science

Page: 198

View: 7627

Between 1976 and 1983, during a period of brutal military dictatorship, armed forces in Argentina abducted 30,000 citizens. These victims were tortured and killed, never to be seen again. Although the history of los desaparecidos, “the disappeared,” has become widely known, the stories of the Argentines who miraculously survived their imprisonment and torture are not well understood. The Reappeared is the first in-depth study of an officially sanctioned group of Argentine former political prisoners, the Association of Former Political Prisoners of Córdoba, which organized in 2007. Using ethnographic methods, anthropologist Rebekah Park explains the experiences of these survivors of state terrorism and in the process raises challenging questions about how societies define victimhood, what should count as a human rights abuse, and what purpose memorial museums actually serve. The men and women who reappeared were often ostracized by those who thought they must have been collaborators to have survived imprisonment, but their actual stories are much more complex. Park explains why the political prisoners waited nearly three decades before forming their own organization and offers rare insights into what motivates them to recall their memories of solidarity and resistance during the dictatorial past, even as they suffer from the long-term effects of torture and imprisonment. The Reappeared challenges readers to rethink the judicial and legislative aftermath of genocide and forces them to consider how much reparation is actually needed to compensate for unimaginable—and lifelong—suffering.

Why Women Protest

Women's Movements in Chile

Author: Lisa Baldez

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521010061

Category: Political Science

Page: 234

View: 4799

Why do women protest? Under what conditions do women protest on the basis of their gender identity? Professor Baldez answers in terms of tipping, timing and framing. She relies on the concept of tipping to identify the point at which diverse organizations converge to form a women's movement. She argues that two conditions trigger this mobilization among women: partisan realignment, understood as the emergence of a new set of issues around which political elites define themselves, and women's decision to frame realignment in terms of widely held norms about gender difference. To illustrate these claims, she compares two very different women's movements in Chile: the mobilization of women against President Salvador Allende (1970–3) and that against General Augusto Pinochet (1973–90). Despite differences between these two movements, both emerged amidst a context of partisan realignment and framed their concerns in terms of women's exclusion from the political arena.

The Daughters of the Plaza de Mayo

Author: David Moshman

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 0595409180

Category: Fiction

Page: 152

View: 1918

In the late 1970s some 30,000 Argentines, mostly young men and women thought to have leftist sympathies, were kidnapped and tortured to death by the military government, which denied what was happening. In response, the mothers of the disappeared came together and marched in Buenos Aires at the Plaza de Mayo, demanding week after week that their children be returned or accounted for. Democracy was finally restored, with promises of truth and justice. As memory gave way to historical amnesia, however, and judicial processes to "reconciliation," the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo continued to march. "Do not forget," they insisted, "do not forgive." Sixty years later, a nonlocalizable electronic agent that calls itself the Daughters of the Plaza de Mayo emerges on the global Network. No one knows what the Daughters are or what they want. They tell horrifying stories from Argentina and elsewhere. They provide seemingly endless lists of victims' names. They invoke El Eternauta, a comic book character from a space beyond time, to press a moral perspective that demands the impossible. They are singular and plural, informative and obscure, irritating, threatening, unclassifiable, and relentless in the pursuit of their agenda, whatever that may be.

Children and Global Conflict

Author: Kim Huynh,Bina D'Costa,Katrina Lee-Koo

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107038847

Category: Political Science

Page: 356

View: 1662

Examines how children, armed conflict and the international community interact in the twenty-first century.

Motherhood and War

International Perspectives

Author: D. Cooper,C. Phelan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137437944

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 337

Traditional histories of war have typically explored masculine narratives of military and political action, leaving private, domestic life relatively unstudied. This volume expands our understanding by looking at the relationships between mothers and children, and the varied roles both have assumed during periods of armed conflict.

Digging for the Disappeared

Forensic Science after Atrocity

Author: Adam Rosenblatt

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 080479488X

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 2090

The mass graves from our long human history of genocide, massacres, and violent conflict form an underground map of atrocity that stretches across the planet's surface. In the past few decades, due to rapidly developing technologies and a powerful global human rights movement, the scientific study of those graves has become a standard facet of post-conflict international assistance. Digging for the Disappeared provides readers with a window into this growing but little-understood form of human rights work, including the dangers and sometimes unexpected complications that arise as evidence is gathered and the dead are named. Adam Rosenblatt examines the ethical, political, and historical foundations of the rapidly growing field of forensic investigation, from the graves of the "disappeared" in Latin America to genocides in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia to post–Saddam Hussein Iraq. In the process, he illustrates how forensic teams strive to balance the needs of war crimes tribunals, transitional governments, and the families of the missing in post-conflict nations. Digging for the Disappeared draws on interviews with key players in the field to present a new way to analyze and value the work forensic experts do at mass graves, shifting the discussion from an exclusive focus on the rights of the living to a rigorous analysis of the care of the dead. Rosenblatt tackles these heady, hard topics in order to extend human rights scholarship into the realm of the dead and the limited but powerful forms of repair available for victims of atrocity.

The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere

Human Rights and U.S. Cold War Policy toward Argentina

Author: William Michael Schmidli

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801469619

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1566

During the first quarter-century of the Cold War, upholding human rights was rarely a priority in U.S. policy toward Latin America. Seeking to protect U.S. national security, American policymakers quietly cultivated relations with politically ambitious Latin American militaries—a strategy clearly evident in the Ford administration’s tacit support of state-sanctioned terror in Argentina following the 1976 military coup d’état. By the mid-1970s, however, the blossoming human rights movement in the United States posed a serious threat to the maintenance of close U.S. ties to anticommunist, right-wing military regimes. The competition between cold warriors and human rights advocates culminated in a fierce struggle to define U.S. policy during the Jimmy Carter presidency. In The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere, William Michael Schmidli argues that Argentina emerged as the defining test case of Carter’s promise to bring human rights to the center of his administration’s foreign policy. Entering the Oval Office at the height of the kidnapping, torture, and murder of tens of thousands of Argentines by the military government, Carter set out to dramatically shift U.S. policy from subtle support to public condemnation of human rights violation. But could the administration elicit human rights improvements in the face of a zealous military dictatorship, rising Cold War tension, and domestic political opposition? By grappling with the disparate actors engaged in the struggle over human rights, including civil rights activists, second-wave feminists, chicano/a activists, religious progressives, members of the New Right, conservative cold warriors, and business leaders, Schmidli utilizes unique interviews with U.S. and Argentine actors as well as newly declassified archives to offer a telling analysis of the rise, efficacy, and limits of human rights in shaping U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War.

History, Memory, and State-Sponsored Violence

Time and Justice

Author: Berber Bevernage

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136634444

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 763

Modern historiography embraces the notion that time is irreversible, implying that the past should be imagined as something ‘absent’ or ‘distant.’ Victims of historical injustice, however, in contrast, often claim that the past got ‘stuck’ in the present and that it retains a haunting presence. History, Memory, and State-Sponsored Violence is centered around the provocative thesis that the way one deals with historical injustice and the ethics of history is strongly dependent on the way one conceives of historical time; that the concept of time traditionally used by historians is structurally more compatible with the perpetrators’ than the victims’ point of view. Demonstrating that the claim of victims about the continuing presence of the past should be taken seriously, instead of being treated as merely metaphorical, Berber Bevernage argues that a genuine understanding of the ‘irrevocable’ past demands a radical break with modern historical discourse and the concept of time. By embedding a profound philosophical reflection on the themes of historical time and historical discourse in a concrete series of case studies, this project transcends the traditional divide between ‘empirical’ historiography on the one hand and the so called ‘theoretical’ approaches to history on the other. It also breaks with the conventional ‘analytical’ philosophy of history that has been dominant during the last decades, raising a series of long-neglected ‘big questions’ about the historical condition – questions about historical time, the unity of history, and the ontological status of present and past –programmatically pleading for a new historical ethics.

The Pinochet Effect

Transnational Justice in the Age of Human Rights

Author: Naomi Roht-Arriaza

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812219746

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 4659

What Pinochet's arrest has taught us about transnational justice and international jurisdiction.

Growing in the Dark

Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences

Author: Janine M. Baer

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1462843603

Category: Law

Page: 157

View: 8293

Generations of adults who were adopted as children have been kept in the dark about their original identities. The law sealing birth records, passed in 1935 in California during the Great Depression, swept adoptions emotional complexities under the rug and made it possible to keep adoption itself a secret. Reflecting extensive archival research and written for general audiences as well as professionals, Growing in the Dark: Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences takes you through Californias early adoption laws, the sealing of records in the era of baby seller Georgia Tann, and the various consequences of this policy as they unfolded throughout the 20th century. WHAT REVIEWERS HAVE SAID: "...articulate, easy to read, and filled with real facts concerning sealed records." - Jean Brown, adoptee "If you work or live with adoption, you cannot afford to skip this book. Everyone seeking to reverse outdated sealed records laws should also provide a copy of the slim paperback to their legislatures." - Mirah Riben, author "...full of fascinating information...you wont be able to put it down." - Anita Field, Bastard Nation "Janine Baer, who was adopted in California, focuses on the California law enacted in 1935 sealing original birth certificates. Contrary to the popular perception, the intent of this law was not to protect the privacy of birthmothers. Rather, these records were sealed to protect children from the stigma of illegitimacy, to protect adoptive parents from intrusions by birthparents, to allow adoptive parents to keep the childs adoptive status a secret, to create the illusion that the birthparents did not exist, and to prevent adoptees from finding their birthfamilies. ...This is an excellent book for birthparents, adoptees, and adoptive parents who want to know how we got to where we are." - Jane Edwards, Portland, Oregon "Growing in the Dark, by virtue of its modest length and accessibility, can be used to educate people both within and outside of the adoption reform movement about the effects of sealed records and the faulty premises used to support them." - Barbara Busharis, American Adoption Congress "Decree" "Extensive notes and bibliographic information make it an excellent resource for those arguing for open records." - Sandra Falconer Pace, Canadian Council of Natural Mothers Note on price: Nonprofit organizations and resellers get 40% off. Call Xlibris for these orders: 1-888-795-4274.

Anticancer

A New Way of Life

Author: David Servan-Schreiber

Publisher: Penguin Group

ISBN: 0670020346

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 258

View: 9113

The author describes his treatment for brain cancer, challenges beliefs about the body's ability to heal, identifies the environmental and lifestyle factors that promote cancer growth, and outlines conventional and alternative therapies.

There was this Goat

Investigating the Truth Commission Testimony of Notrose Nobomvu Konile

Author: Antjie Krog,Nosisi Lynette Mpolweni-Zantsi,Kopano Ratele

Publisher: University of Natal Press

ISBN: 9781869141660

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 9220

On April 23, 1996, Notrose Nobomvu Konile lifted her hand and swore to tell the truth to the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. She was the mother of Zabonke Konile, a young man killed in what has become known as the Gugulethu Seven incident. Antjie Krog, reporting as a journalist at the time, was struck by the seeming incoherence of the testimony. In 2004, colleagues Nosisi Mpolweni and Kopano Ratele joined Krog in a closer investigation of Mrs. Konile's words. The resulting three-year collaboration, drawing on different disciplinary and social backgrounds, has produced a fascinating account that leaves no detail of Mrs. Konile's narrative unexplored and poses questions about the unacknowledged assumptions that underpin research in this country. In addition, the book sheds light on the larger and highly relevant issues of how black and white South Africans can build bridges towards understanding one another across the cultural, social, and economic divides that threaten the country's democracy.

State Repression and the Labors of Memory

Author: Elizabeth Jelin

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816642830

Category: History

Page: 163

View: 8205

Hearing the news from South America at the turn of the millennium can be like traveling in time: here are the trials of Pinochet, the searches for "the disappeared" in Argentina, the investigation of the death of former president Goulart in Brazil, the Peace Commission in Uruguay, the Archive of Terror in Paraguay, a Truth Commission in Peru. As societies struggle to come to terms with the past and with the vexing questions posed by ineradicable memories, this wise book offers guidance. Combining a concrete sense of present urgency and a theoretical understanding of social, political, and historical realities, State Repression and the Labors of Memory fashions tools for thinking about and analyzing the presences, silences, and meanings of the past. With unflappable good judgment and fairness, Elizabeth Jelin clarifies the often muddled debates about the nature of memory, the politics of struggles over memories of historical injustice, the relation of historiography to memory, the issue of truth in testimony and traumatic remembrance, the role of women in Latin American attempts to cope with the legacies of military dictatorships, and problems of second-generation memory and its transmission and appropriation. Jelin's work engages European and North American theory in its exploration of the various ways in which conflicts over memory shape individual and collective identities, as well as social and political cleavages. In doing so, her book exposes the enduring consequences of repression for social processes in Latin America, and at the same time enriches our general understanding of the fundamentally conflicted and contingent nature of memory. A timely exploration of the nature ofmemory and its political uses.