Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement

Author: Sally McMillen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199758609

Category: Social Science

Page: 322

View: 2451

In a quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement and change the course of history. The implications of that remarkable convention would be felt around the world and indeed are still being felt today. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Woman's Rights Movement, the latest contribution to Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments in American History series, Sally McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840-1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the lasting and transformative effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time--and destined to be thus regarded by the future historian." In this lively and warmly written study, Sally McMillen may well be the future historian Anthony was hoping to find. A vibrant portrait of a major turning point in American women's history, and in human history, this book is essential reading for anyone wishing to fully understand the origins of the woman's rights movement.

Achtzig Jahre und mehr

Author: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Publisher: ein-FACH-verlag

ISBN: 3928089587

Category:

Page: 410

View: 7736

The Road to Seneca Falls

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the First Woman's Rights Convention

Author: Judith Wellman

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252092821

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 4391

Feminists from 1848 to the present have rightly viewed the Seneca Falls convention as the birth of the women's rights movement in the United States and beyond. In The Road To Seneca Falls, Judith Wellman offers the first well documented, full-length account of this historic meeting in its contemporary context. The convention succeeded by uniting powerful elements of the antislavery movement, radical Quakers, and the campaign for legal reform under a common cause. Wellman shows that these three strands converged not only in Seneca Falls, but also in the life of women's rights pioneer Elizabeth Cady Stanton. It is this convergence, she argues, that foments one of the greatest rebellions of modern times. Rather than working heavy-handedly downward from their official "Declaration of Sentiments," Wellman works upward from richly detailed documentary evidence to construct a complex tapestry of causes that lay behind the convention, bringing the struggle to life. Her approach results in a satisfying combination of social, community, and reform history with individual and collective biographical elements. The Road to Seneca Falls challenges all of us to reflect on what it means to be an American trying to implement the belief that "all men and women are created equal," both then and now. A fascinating story in its own right, it is also a seminal piece of scholarship for anyone interested in history, politics, or gender.

The Myth of Seneca Falls

Memory and the Women's Suffrage Movement, 1848-1898

Author: Lisa Tetrault

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469614278

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 8544

Myth of Seneca Falls: Memory and the Women's Suffrage Movement, 1848-1898

Lucy Stone

An Unapologetic Life

Author: Sally Gregory McMillen,Sally G. McMillen

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199778396

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 9175

"A biography of Lucy Stone, who, while often overshadowed by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and others, played a pivotal role in the woman's rights movement and fought for gender equality throughout her life"--

Century of Struggle

The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States

Author: Eleanor Flexner,Ellen Frances Fitzpatrick

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674106536

Category: Political Science

Page: 398

View: 4818

Details the struggle for women's voting rights, one of the great social movements in American history.

Die 4-Stunden-Woche

Mehr Zeit, mehr Geld, mehr Leben

Author: Timothy Ferriss

Publisher: Ullstein eBooks

ISBN: 3843704457

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 4489

Warum arbeiten wir uns eigentlich zu Tode? Haben wir nichts Besseres zu tun? Und ob! - sagt Timothy Ferriss. Der junge Unternehmer war lange Workaholic mit 80-Stunden-Woche. Doch dann erfand er MBA- Management by Absence- und ist seitdem freier, reicher, glücklicher. Mit viel Humor, provokanten Denkanstößen und erprobten Tipps erklärt Ferriss, wie sich die 4-Stunden-Woche bei vollem Lohnausgleich verwirklichen lässt. Der Wegweiser für eine Flucht aus dem Hamsterrad und ein Manifest für eine neue Gewichtung zwischen Leben und Arbeiten.

Women's Suffrage

A Primary Source History of the Women's Rights Movement in America

Author: Colleen Adams

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780823936854

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 1280

Chronicles women's struggle for suffrage in the United States, including the contributions of such prominent figures as Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott.

Die Hörigkeit der Frau

Author: John Stuart Mill

Publisher: Musaicum Books

ISBN: 8027205727

Category: Social Science

Page: 145

View: 4186

Diese Ausgabe von "Die Hörigkeit der Frau" wurde mit einem funktionalen Layout erstellt und sorgfältig formatiert. John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) war ein englischer Philosoph und Ökonom und einer der einflussreichsten liberalen Denker des 19. Jahrhunderts. Er war Anhänger des Utilitarismus, der von Jeremy Bentham, dem Lehrer und Freund seines Vaters James Mill, entwickelt wurde. Aus dem Buch: "Bei allen zarteren Verrichtungen der Natur - von welchen die der belebten Schöpfung die zartesten und von diesen wieder die des Nervensystems die allerzartesten sind - hängen die Verschiedenheiten der Wirkung ebensowohl von der Verschiedenheit der betreffenden Organe nach ihrer Qualität wie nach ihrer Quantität ab, und wenn die Qualität eines Instrumentes nach der Feinheit und Sauberkeit des Werkes, das es verrichten kann, zu beurteilen ist, so weist dieser Schluß auf eine durchschnittlich feinere Qualität des Gehirnes und Nervensystems der Frauen als der Männer hin. Sieht man indes von allen abstrakten Unterschieden der Qualität ab, die zu belegen immer eine schwierige Sache bleibt, so weiß man doch, daß die Wirksamkeit eines Organes nicht allein von seinem Umfange, sondern von seiner Tätigkeit abhängt, und von dieser haben wir ein annäherndes Maß in der Kraft, mit welcher das Blut durch dasselbe zirkuliert, da sowohl der Stimulus wie die ersetzende Kraft hauptsächlich von dieser Zirkulation abhängt."

Die Berge Kaliforniens

Author: John Muir

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783882210507

Category: Muir, John 1838-1914 / Travel / Sierra Nevada (Calif. and Nevada)

Page: 352

View: 9911

The Age of Lincoln and the Art of American Power, 1848-1876

Author: William Nester

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1612346596

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 6134

Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö

The Role of Female Seminaries on the Road to Social Justice for Women

Author: Kristen Welch,Abraham Ruelas

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1630877506

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 9497

In the United States, female seminaries and their antecedents, the female academies, were crucial first institutions that played a vital role in liberating women from the "home sphere," a locus that was the primary domain of Euro-American women. The female seminaries founded by Native Americans and African Americans had different founding rationales but also played a key role in empowering women. On the whole, the initial intent of these schools was to prepare women for their proper role in American society as wives and mothers. An unintended effect, however, was to prepare women for the first socially accepted profession for women: teaching. Thus equipped, women played a crucial role in the development of American education at all levels while achieving varying degrees of social justice for themselves and other groups through engagement in the reform movements of their times--including women's suffrage, abolition, temperance, and mental health reform. By recapturing the role religion played in shaping education for women, Welch and Ruelas offer a refreshing take on history that draws on several primary texts and details more than one hundred female seminaries and academies opened in the United States.

Lucretia Mott's Heresy

Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Carol Faulkner

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812205008

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 5037

Lucretia Coffin Mott was one of the most famous and controversial women in nineteenth-century America. Now overshadowed by abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and feminists such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mott was viewed in her time as a dominant figure in the dual struggles for racial and sexual equality. History has often depicted her as a gentle Quaker lady and a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to authority riled ministers, journalists, politicians, urban mobs, and her fellow Quakers. In the first biography of Mott in a generation, historian Carol Faulkner reveals the motivations of this radical egalitarian from Nantucket. Mott's deep faith and ties to the Society of Friends do not fully explain her activism—her roots in post-Revolutionary New England also shaped her views on slavery, patriarchy, and the church, as well as her expansive interests in peace, temperance, prison reform, religious freedom, and Native American rights. While Mott was known as the "moving spirit" of the first women's rights convention at Seneca Falls, her commitment to women's rights never trumped her support for abolition or racial equality. She envisioned women's rights not as a new and separate movement but rather as an extension of the universal principles of liberty and equality. Mott was among the first white Americans to call for an immediate end to slavery. Her long-term collaboration with white and black women in the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society was remarkable by any standards. Lucretia Mott's Heresy reintroduces readers to an amazing woman whose work and ideas inspired the transformation of American society.

Failure is Impossible!

The History of American Women's Rights

Author: Martha E. Kendall

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 9780822517443

Category: Social Science

Page: 96

View: 7156

Chronicles the development of feminist ideas and women's rights in America from the Salem witchcraft trials of the seventeenth century through the appointment of the first woman secretary of state in the late twentieth century.

The American Suffragette's Journey to Enfranchisement: From Seneca Falls to Ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment In Text And Photos

Author: N.A

Publisher: Jeffrey Frank Jones

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 7564

Topics by Chapter: Copyright The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Women’s Right to Vote (1920) Woman's Suffrage History Timeline Report of the Woman's Rights Convention The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848–1920 The National Woman's Party Tactics And Techniques Of The National Woman’s Party Suffrage campaign Photos: Suffrage Marches And Parades Did You Know: Women and African Americans Could Vote in NJ before the 15th and 19th Amendments? Women’s Suffrage In The Progressive Era Women's Suffrage and WWI Educator Resources -Woman Suffrage and the 19th Amendment From the Local to the Global: America’s Newspapers Chronicle the Struggle for Women’s Rights List of Suffrage Prisoners This Day in History: The 1913 Women's Suffrage Parade One Hundred Years Toward Suffrage Handbook of the National American Woman Suffrage Association Teacher’s Guide Primary Source Set: Women’s Suffrage Recommended Reading Using Primary Sources

Citizenship and the Origins of Women's History in the United States

Author: Teresa Anne Murphy

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812208285

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6939

Women's history emerged as a genre in the waning years of the eighteenth century, a period during which concepts of nationhood and a sense of belonging expanded throughout European nations and the young American republic. Early women's histories had criticized the economic practices, intellectual abilities, and political behavior of women while emphasizing the importance of female domesticity in national development. These histories had created a narrative of exclusion that legitimated the variety of citizenship considered suitable for women, which they argued should be constructed in a very different way from that of men: women's relationship to the nation should be considered in terms of their participation in civil society and the domestic realm. But the throes of the Revolution and the emergence of the first woman's rights movement challenged the dominance of that narrative and complicated the history writers' interpretation of women's history and the idea of domestic citizenship. In Citizenship and the Origins of Women's History in the United States, Teresa Anne Murphy traces the evolution of women's history from the late eighteenth century to the time of the Civil War, demonstrating that competing ideas of women's citizenship had a central role in the ways those histories were constructed. This intellectual history examines the concept of domestic citizenship that was promoted in the popular writing of Sarah Josepha Hale and Elizabeth Ellet and follows the threads that link them to later history writers, such as Lydia Maria Child and Carolyn Dall, who challenged those narratives and laid the groundwork for advancing a more progressive woman's rights agenda. As woman's rights activists recognized, citizenship encompassed activities that ranged far beyond specific legal rights for women to their broader terms of inclusion in society, the economy, and government. Citizenship and the Origins of Women's History in the United States demonstrates that citizenship is at the heart of women's history and, consequently, that women's history is the history of nations.

Onkel Tom`s Hütte

Author: Harriet Beecher Stowe

Publisher: BookRix

ISBN: 3736833466

Category: Drama

Page: 195

View: 3747

Dieses Buch ist eine flammende Anklage gegen den Rassismus, wo immer er einem begegnet. Die Autorin schreibt dieses Plädoyer für ein freies Amerika im Jahre 1852. Die Sklaverei ist im Süden der USA integraler Bestandteil des Wirtschaftswesens. Die Schrift war wichtige Unterstützung für die Verfechter einer von Sklaverei befreiten Welt im Sezessionskrieg, der letztendlich zur Abschaffung der Sklaverei führte.

Origins of the Women's Rights Movement

Author: LeeAnne Gelletly

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1422293467

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 6004

In the 1800s, women were second-class citizens. By law, married women were owned by their husbands. Women had no political rights. They could not vote. They could not hold office. By custom, women did not dare speak before men in public. But some women refused to be silenced. They saw wrongs in the world that needed fixing. The injustice of slavery led women like Lucretia Mott, Angelina Grimké, and Lucy Stone to step outside traditional roles. As women abolitionists, they lectured, circulated petitions, and lobbied lawmakers. But female reformers soon became frustrated. Men-only groups prevented women from speaking. Their help was often rejected. This led a determined few to call for equal rights for women. Among the movement's early leaders were Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Along with many other women activists, they would fight for a woman's right to be a true citizen of the United States.