Small Town Baltimore

An Album of Memories

Author: Gilbert Sandler

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801870699

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 4071

"This "album of memories" introduces the reader to the people and places - neighborhoods, restaurants, department stores, parks, hotels, night clubs, racetracks, and theaters - that once put the charm in Charm City."--BOOK JACKET.

Baltimore's Bygone Department Stores

Many Happy Returns

Author: Michael J. Lisicky

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1614236623

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7013

Michael J. Lisicky is the author of several bestselling books, including Hutzler's: Where Baltimore Shops. In demand as a department store historian, he has given lectures at institutions such as the New York Public Library, the Boston Public Library, the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, the Milwaukee County Historical Society, the Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Jewish Museum of Maryland. His books have received critical acclaim from the Baltimore Sun, Baltimore City Paper, Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Pittsburgh Post Gazette. He has been interviewed by national business periodicals including Fortune Magazine, Investor's Business Daily and Bloomberg Businessweek. His book Gimbels Has It was recommended by National Public Radio's Morning Edition program as "One of the Freshest Reads of 2011." Mr. Lisicky helps run an "Ask the Expert" column with author Jan Whitaker at www.departmentstorehistory.net and resides in Baltimore, where he is an oboist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

Growing Up in Baltimore

A Photographic History

Author: Eden Unger Bowditch

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738513577

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 8228

Chronicling the period from the mid-nineteenth century to the early 1900s through striking vintage photographs, Growing Up in Baltimore pays tribute to the enduring courage and spirit of children. In a city that has been, at once, blessed with a rich port and torn apart by war, filled with pristine parks and scarred by the ravages of industrial life, childhood has reflected the ever-changing times and culture in American life. From baseball games and trips to the zoo to schoolyard pals and amusement park rides, children explored the world around them. But the nostalgia and innocence of well-born youth mingled with the harsher realities that many boys and girls knew as their daily lives-laboring in the mills and factories, the haphazard destruction of fires and storms, the segregation of public places, the cold and hunger so keenly felt during the Great Depression.

Baltimore Book

New Views of Local History

Author: Elizabeth Fee,Linda Shopes

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1566391849

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 4384

Baltimore has a long, colorful history that traditionally has been focused on famous men, social elites, and patriotic events. The Baltimore Book is both a history of "the other Baltimore" and a tour guide to places in the city that are important to labor, African American, and women's history. The book grew out of a popular local bus tour conducted by public historians, the People's History Tour of Baltimore, that began in 1982. This book records and adds sites to that tour; provides maps, photographs, and contemporary documents; and includes interviews with some of the uncelebrated people whose experiences as Baltimoreans reflect more about the city than Francis Scott Key ever did.The tour begins at the B&O Railroad Station at Camden Yards, site of the railroad strike of 1877, moves on to Hampden-Woodbury, the mid-19th century cotton textile industry's company town, and stops on the way to visit Evergreen House and to hear the narratives of ex-slaves. We travel to Old West Baltimore, the late 19th-century center of commerce and culture for the African American community; Fells Point; Sparrows Point; the suburbs; Federal Hill; and Baltimore's "renaissance" at Harborplace. Interviews with community activists, civil rights workers, Catholic Workers, and labor union organizers bring color and passion to this historical tour. Specific labor struggles, class and race relations, and the contributions of women to Baltimore's development are emphasized at each stop. Author note: Elizabeth Fee is Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management of The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.Linda Shopes is Associate Historian at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.Linda Zeidman is Professor of History and Economics at Essex Community College.

The Jewish Community of Baltimore

Author: Lauren R. Silberman

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738553979

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 9251

When Jews arrived in the mid-1700s, Baltimore was little more than a backwater port with an uncertain future. As the city grew so did its Jewish community, forming its first congregation in 1830 and hiring the first ordained rabbi in America in 1840. Today Baltimore is home to one of the nation's largest and most diverse Jewish communities, with approximately 100,000 Jews living in the metropolitan area. Through photographs and documents drawn primarily from the collection of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, The Jewish Community of Baltimore chronicles this fascinating history. More than 200 historic images portray the progress of Baltimore's Jews from a handful of immigrants starting new lives in a growing port city, to an established network of clergy, businesspeople, educators, philanthropists, and civic leaders. From the family-owned delis on Lombard Street and the grand department stores on Howard Street, to the majestic synagogues on Eutaw Place and the current epicenter of Jewish life on Park Heights Avenue, Jews have left an indelible mark on Baltimore.

Lost Baltimore

Author: Gregory J. Alexander,Paul Kelsey Williams

Publisher: Pavilion Books, Limited

ISBN: 9781909108431

Category: Architecture

Page: 142

View: 1205

Profiles places in Baltimore that have been destroyed, altered, or demolished during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with photographs of the original structures, background information, and stories about memorable individuals.

Jewish Baltimore

A Family Album

Author: Gilbert Sandler

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801864278

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 4308

From Nates and Leon's deli to Hutzler's department store, a columnist for Baltimore's "Jewish Times" and the "Baltimore Sun" tells of neighborhoods and landmarks that have been important to the city's Jewish population from 1850 to today. More than 100 nostalgic photos help bring the memories to life.

Tradition, Urban Identity, and the Baltimore “Hon"

The Folk in the City

Author: David J. Puglia

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1498551106

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 6425

This book tells the story of the battles that flared over Baltimore’s attempts to use “hon” to construct a citywide local tradition and their consequences for the future of local culture in the United States.

Jewish Life in Small-Town America

A History

Author: Lee Shai Weissbach

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300127652

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 4090

In this book, Lee Shai Weissbach offers the first comprehensive portrait of small-town Jewish life in America. Exploring the history of communities of 100 to 1000 Jews, the book focuses on the years from the mid-nineteenth century to World War II. Weissbach examines the dynamics of 490 communities across the United States and reveals that smaller Jewish centers were not simply miniature versions of larger communities but were instead alternative kinds of communities in many respects. The book investigates topics ranging from migration patterns to occupational choices, from Jewish education and marriage strategies to congregational organization. The story of smaller Jewish communities attests to the richness and complexity of American Jewish history and also serves to remind us of the diversity of small-town society in times past.

Hutzler's

Where Baltimore Shops

Author: Michael J. Lisicky

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1614230315

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 160

View: 3931

For 132 years, Hutzler Brothers Company was a beloved part of the Baltimore retail and cultural scene. Charm City natives still recall with nostalgia the distinctive Art Deco design of the Downtown store, the glitter of the fashion shows, the unforgettable Christmas celebrations and the chocolate chiffon pie served in the store's Colonial Restaurant. Local author Michael J. Lisicky pays tribute to Hutzler's as he chronicles the rise of the family-run department store, its growth into Towson and other Maryland cities and its eventual and much lamented passing. Interviews with John Waters, former Hutzlerites and statesmen provide a glimpse into the role that Hutzler's played in the lives of so many Baltimoreans. With his vivid prose and some classic Hutzler's recipes, Lisicky brings to life this lost Baltimore institution.

"Brown" in Baltimore

School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism

Author: Howell S. Baum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457106

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 3472

In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the city's liberal school board voted to desegregate and adopted a free choice policy that made integration voluntary. Baltimore's school desegregation proceeded peacefully, without the resistance or violence that occurred elsewhere. However, few whites chose to attend school with blacks, and after a few years of modest desegregation, schools resegregated and became increasingly segregated. The school board never changed its policy. Black leaders had urged the board to adopt free choice and, despite the limited desegregation, continued to support the policy and never sued the board to do anything else. Baum finds that American liberalism is the key to explaining how this happened. Myrdal observed that many whites believed in equality in the abstract but considered blacks inferior and treated them unequally. School officials were classical liberals who saw the world in terms of individuals, not races. They adopted a desegregation policy that explicitly ignored students' race and asserted that all students were equal in freedom to choose schools, while their policy let whites who disliked blacks avoid integration. School officials' liberal thinking hindered them from understanding or talking about the city's history of racial segregation, continuing barriers to desegregation, and realistic change strategies. From the classroom to city hall, Baum examines how Baltimore's distinct identity as a border city between North and South shaped local conversations about the national conflict over race and equality. The city's history of wrestling with the legacy of Brown reveals Americans' preferred way of dealing with racial issues: not talking about race. This avoidance, Baum concludes, allows segregation to continue.

On Middle Ground

A History of the Jews of Baltimore

Author: Eric L. Goldstein,Deborah R. Weiner

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421424525

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 6921

In 1938, Gustav Brunn and his family fled Nazi Germany and settled in Baltimore. Brunn found a job at McCormick’s Spice Company but was fired after three days when, according to family legend, the manager discovered he was Jewish. He started his own successful business using a spice mill he brought over from Germany and developed a blend especially for the seafood purveyors across the street. Before long, his Old Bay spice blend would grace kitchen cabinets in virtually every home in Maryland. The Brunns sold the business in 1986. Four years later, Old Bay was again sold—to McCormick. In On Middle Ground, the first truly comprehensive history of Baltimore’s Jewish community, Eric L. Goldstein and Deborah R. Weiner describe not only the formal institutions of Jewish life but also the everyday experiences of families like the Brunns and of a diverse Jewish population that included immigrants and natives, factory workers and department store owners, traditionalists and reformers. The story of Baltimore Jews—full of absorbing characters and marked by dramas of immigration, acculturation, and assimilation—is the story of American Jews in microcosm. But its contours also reflect the city’s unique culture. Goldstein and Weiner argue that Baltimore’s distinctive setting as both a border city and an immigrant port offered opportunities for advancement that made it a magnet for successive waves of Jewish settlers. The authors detail how the city began to attract enterprising merchants during the American Revolution, when it thrived as one of the few ports remaining free of British blockade. They trace Baltimore’s meteoric rise as a commercial center, which drew Jewish newcomers who helped the upstart town surpass Philadelphia as the second-largest American city. They explore the important role of Jewish entrepreneurs as Baltimore became a commercial gateway to the South and later developed a thriving industrial scene. Readers learn how, in the twentieth century, the growth of suburbia and the redevelopment of downtown offered scope to civic leaders, business owners, and real estate developers. From symphony benefactor Joseph Meyerhoff to Governor Marvin Mandel and trailblazing state senator Rosalie Abrams, Jews joined the ranks of Baltimore’s most influential cultural, philanthropic, and political leaders while working on the grassroots level to reshape a metro area confronted with the challenges of modern urban life. Accessibly written and enriched by more than 130 illustrations, On Middle Ground reveals that local Jewish life was profoundly shaped by Baltimore’s "middleness"—its hybrid identity as a meeting point between North and South, a major industrial center with a legacy of slavery, and a large city with a small-town feel.

Dundalk

Author: Gary Helton

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738542126

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 9484

Dundalk of today was born in 1895 when an Irish businessman affixed a handmade sign to a newly constructed freight station, proclaiming the name of this Baltimore County community. From then on, the area developed into a hotbed of industry and military activity. The Pennsylvania Steel Company fired up its blast furnaces at Sparrows Point. Brickmakers Burns and Russell, whose firm dates back to 1790, began manufacturing on a 125-acre parcel near what is now Logan Village. During the War of 1812, British forces invaded Patapsco Neck and were repelled by local militia. People lucky enough to make Dundalk their home over the years have fond memories of Riverview Park on Colgate Creek, a popular family amusement park along what is now Broening Highway, and of playing and relaxing at William McShane's Maryland Swimming Club, which boasted first-rate clay tennis courts and a bathing beach. More than 200 vintage photographs are included in this volume, assembled from private collections and the files of the Dundalk- Patapsco Neck Historical Society Museum. They feature current and former landmarks like Harbor Field, Fort Holabird, the Brentwood Inn, Todd House, Bay Shore Park, WAYE Radio, and the Lyceum Theatre. Equally important are the images of everyday people, many of whom impacted the community through their character and profession.

Baltimore

A Political History

Author: Matthew A. Crenson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421422077

Category: History

Page: 632

View: 2956

Charm City or Mobtown? People from Baltimore glory in its eccentric charm, small-town character, and North-cum-South culture. But for much of the nineteenth century, violence and disorder plagued the city. More recently, the 2015 death of Freddie Gray in police custody has prompted Baltimoreans—and the entire nation—to focus critically on the rich and tangled narrative of black–white relations in Baltimore, where slavery once existed alongside the largest community of free blacks in the United States. Matthew A. Crenson, a distinguished political scientist and Baltimore native, examines the role of politics and race throughout Baltimore’s history. From its founding in 1729 up through the recent past, Crenson follows Baltimore’s political evolution from an empty expanse of marsh and hills to a complicated city with distinct ways of doing business. Revealing how residents at large engage (and disengage) with one another across an expansive agenda of issues and conflicts, Crenson shows how politics helped form this complex city’s personality. Crenson provocatively argues that Baltimore’s many quirks are likely symptoms of urban underdevelopment. The city’s longtime domination by the general assembly—and the corresponding weakness of its municipal authority—forced residents to adopt the private and extra-governmental institutions that shaped early Baltimore. On the one hand, Baltimore was resolutely parochial, split by curious political quarrels over issues as minor as loose pigs. On the other, it was keenly attuned to national politics: during the Revolution, for instance, Baltimoreans were known for their comparative radicalism. Crenson describes how, as Baltimore and the nation grew, whites competed with blacks, slave and free, for menial and low-skill work. He also explores how the urban elite thrived by avoiding, wherever possible, questions of slavery vs. freedom—just as, long after the Civil War and emancipation, wealthier Baltimoreans preferred to sidestep racial controversy. Peering into the city’s 300-odd neighborhoods, this fascinating account holds up a mirror to Baltimore, asking whites in particular to re-examine the past and accept due responsibility for future racial progress.

Home Town

Author: Tracy Kidder

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0671785214

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 4715

Explores what life is really like in contemporary small-town America, focusing on the people of Northampton, Massachusetts, to assess how individuals in a community transform a place into a home

Baltimore's Halcyon Days

Author: Brooke Gunning,Molly O'Donovan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738506319

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 7141

Baltimore's Halcyon Days chronicles Baltimore's social elite, their homes, and their lifestyle from the dawn of the Republic to the demise of the fingerbowl. Long and widely renowned as an enclave of good taste and culture, Baltimore has from its inception offered a good life to those who could afford it. From hunt cups to hatpins and terrapins to tophats, Baltimoreans were connoisseurs of the best. When life was their oyster, they knew the best way to have it served.

"Brown" in Baltimore

School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism

Author: Howell S. Baum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457106

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 8794

In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the city's liberal school board voted to desegregate and adopted a free choice policy that made integration voluntary. Baltimore's school desegregation proceeded peacefully, without the resistance or violence that occurred elsewhere. However, few whites chose to attend school with blacks, and after a few years of modest desegregation, schools resegregated and became increasingly segregated. The school board never changed its policy. Black leaders had urged the board to adopt free choice and, despite the limited desegregation, continued to support the policy and never sued the board to do anything else. Baum finds that American liberalism is the key to explaining how this happened. Myrdal observed that many whites believed in equality in the abstract but considered blacks inferior and treated them unequally. School officials were classical liberals who saw the world in terms of individuals, not races. They adopted a desegregation policy that explicitly ignored students' race and asserted that all students were equal in freedom to choose schools, while their policy let whites who disliked blacks avoid integration. School officials' liberal thinking hindered them from understanding or talking about the city's history of racial segregation, continuing barriers to desegregation, and realistic change strategies. From the classroom to city hall, Baum examines how Baltimore's distinct identity as a border city between North and South shaped local conversations about the national conflict over race and equality. The city's history of wrestling with the legacy of Brown reveals Americans' preferred way of dealing with racial issues: not talking about race. This avoidance, Baum concludes, allows segregation to continue.

Small-Town America

Finding Community, Shaping the Future

Author: Robert Wuthnow

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400846498

Category: Social Science

Page: 520

View: 1412

More than thirty million Americans live in small, out-of-the-way places. Many of them could have joined the vast majority of Americans who live in cities and suburbs. They could live closer to more lucrative careers and convenient shopping, a wider range of educational opportunities, and more robust health care. But they have opted to live differently. In Small-Town America, we meet factory workers, shop owners, retirees, teachers, clergy, and mayors--residents who show neighborliness in small ways, but who also worry about everything from school closings and their children's futures to the ups and downs of the local economy. Drawing on more than seven hundred in-depth interviews in hundreds of towns across America and three decades of census data, Robert Wuthnow shows the fragility of community in small towns. He covers a host of topics, including the symbols and rituals of small-town life, the roles of formal and informal leaders, the social role of religious congregations, the perception of moral and economic decline, and the myriad ways residents in small towns make sense of their own lives. Wuthnow also tackles difficult issues such as class and race, abortion, homosexuality, and substance abuse. Small-Town America paints a rich panorama of individuals who reside in small communities, finding that, for many people, living in a small town is an important part of self-identity.

A Journey to Womanhood

Poems from a Girl Grown up Too Soon

Author: Dr. Nicole M. Ford-Francis

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1493103873

Category: Poetry

Page: 79

View: 9616

This book is a compilation of my poems since I was a little girl. In 1982, as a fifth grader, my Mother encouraged me to write in a journal. As an English teacher she always emphasized writing and I was able to use my poems, stories and essays as an outlet for my feelings. These poems are precious, personal and they are expressions of me. I was told it was time to share them. Join me on a trip from being a little girl to a teenager who thought she was a woman and who thought she knew everything. This literary journey of poems starts with me tells my dear Grandmother that she is my best friend. One of the poems confesses my love to my unborn son who is now a man. These poems chronicle my relationships with teenage boyfriends and also my marriages with men whom I loved and hated Read on as I reveal the deep friendship and spiritual bond I shared with the powerful Man of God. Finally, the last essay expresses my joy and sense of relief after finally having my doctoral dissertation approved! What a journey This project is a labor of love, of smiles, of fear and of tears that spans a period of over 25 years. Enjoy this time as you travel with me on this, Journey to Womanhood: Chronicles of a Girl Grown up to Soon.

Small Town America in World War II

War Stories from Wrightsville, Pennsylvania

Author: Ronald E. Marcello

Publisher: University of North Texas Press

ISBN: 1574415514

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 5635

Historians acknowledge that World War II touched every man, woman, and child in the United States. In Small Town America in World War II, Ronald E. Marcello uses oral history interviews with civilians and veterans to explore how the citizens of Wrightsville, Pennsylvania, responded to the war effort. Located along the western shore of the Susquehanna River in York County, Wrightsville was a transportation hub with various shops, stores, and services as well as industrial plants. Interviews with citizens and veterans are organized in sections on the home front; the North African-Italian, European, and Pacific theatres; stateside military service; and occupation in Germany. Throughout Marcello provides introductions and contextual narrative on World War II as well as annotations for events and military terms. Overseas the citizens of Wrightsville turned into soldiers. An infantryman in the Italian campaign, Alfred Forry, explained, “I was forty-five days on the line wearing the same clothes, but everybody was in the same situation, so you didn’t mind the stench and body odors.” A veteran of the Battle of the Bulge, Edward Reisinger, remembered, “Replacements had little chance of surviving. They were sent to the front one day, and the next day they were coming back with mattress covers over them. The sergeants never knew the names of these people.” Mortar man Donald Peters described the death of a buddy who was hit by artillery shrapnel: “His arm was just hanging on by the skin, and his intestines were hanging out.” In the conclusion Marcello examines how the war affected Wrightsville. Did the war bring a return to prosperity? What effects did it have on women? How did wartime trauma affect the returning veterans? In short, did World War II transform Wrightsville and its citizens, or was it the same town after the war?