Sociology

Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life Readings

Author: David M. Newman,Jodi O'Brien

Publisher: Pine Forge Press

ISBN: 1412979420

Category: Social Science

Page: 383

View: 1878

This carefully edited companion anthology provides provocative, eye-opening examples of the practice of sociology in a well-edited, well-designed, and affordable format. It includes short articles, chapters, and excerpts that examine common everyday experiences, important social issues, or distinct historical events that illustrate the relationship between the individual and society. The new edition will provide more detail regarding the theory and/or history related to each issue presented. The revision will also include more coverage of global issues and world religions.

Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life

Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life

Author: David M. Newman

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483323390

Category: Social Science

Page: 640

View: 3139

Continuing his tradition of highly engaging, trade-like writing, best-selling author David M. Newman once again starts in a familiar place—the everyday world—and then introduces sociological concepts and institutions as they influence students’ daily existence. Full of vivid, contemporary examples and touching personal vignettes, Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life, Tenth Edition offers a solid introduction to basic sociological concepts, links these concepts to everyday, real-world experiences, and helps students realize their role in constructing, planning, maintaining, and reconstructing society.

Black Men Can't Shoot (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Scott N. Brooks

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1459605608

Category:

Page: 368

View: 9022

The myth of the natural black athlete is widespread, though it's usually only talked about when a sports commentator or celebrity embarrasses himself by bringing it up in public. Those gaffes are swiftly decried as racist, but apart from their link to the long history of ugly racial stereotypes about black people - especially men - they are also harmful because they obscure very real, hard-fought accomplishments. As Black Men Can't Shoot demonstrates, such successes on the basketball court don't just happen because of natural gifts - instead, they grow out of the long, tough, and unpredictable process of becoming a known player. Scott N. Brooks spent four years coaching summer league basketball in Philadelphia. And what he saw, heard, and felt working with the young black men on his team tells us much about how some kids are able to make the extraordinary journey from the ghetto to the NCAA. To show how good players make the transition to greatness, Brooks tells the story of two young men, Jermaine and Ray, following them through their high school years and chronicling their breakthroughs and frustrations on the court as well as their troubles at home. We witness them negotiating the pitfalls of forging a career and a path out of poverty, we see their triumphs and setbacks, and we hear from the network of people - their families, the neighborhood elders, and Coach Brooks himself - invested in their fates. Black Men Can't Shoot has all the hallmarks of a classic sports book, with a climactic championship game and a suspenseful ending as we wait to find out if Jermaine and Ray will be recruited. Brooks's moving coming-of-age story counters the belief that basketball only exploits kids and lures them into following empty dreams - and shows us that by playing ball, some of these young black men have already begun their education even before they get to college.

SAGE Readings for Introductory Sociology

Author: Kimberly McGann

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483378713

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 2758

SAGE Readings for Introductory Sociology is a concise, affordable anthology that contains 22 popular sociology statements designed to introduce readers to the sociological perspective. Kimberly McGann puts together readings that cover core topics in sociology, including culture, socialization, interaction, deviance, gender, class, and race. An alternate, topical table of contents suggests ways to match readings to other subfields in sociology (like family, education, work, and religion), and identifies readings that reflect four theoretical traditions: functionalism, symbolic interactionism, conflict theory, and feminism.

The Meritocracy Myth

Author: Stephen J. McNamee,Robert K. Miller Jr.

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442219831

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 5435

The Meritocracy Myth challenges the widely held American belief in meritocracy—that people get out of the system what they put into it based on individual merit. The third edition has been revised and streamlined, with fresh examples and updated statistical information throughout. Chapters eight and nine have been combined into a comprehensive chapter about discrimination as a non-merit barrier to upward mobility. The book also features a new section on “The Great Recession.” The Meritocracy Myth examines talent, attitude, work ethic, and character as elements of merit, and evaluates the effect of non-merit factors such as social status, race, heritage, and wealth on meritocracy. A compelling book on an often-overlooked topic, The Meritocracy Myth has become a classroom classic to introduce students to this provocative topic.

Sociology and the New Materialism

Theory, Research, Action

Author: Nick J. Fox,Pam Alldred

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1473987385

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 5804

The first book of its kind, Sociology and the New Materialism explores the many and varied applications of “new materialism,” a key emerging trend in 21st century thought, to the practice of doing sociology. Offering a clear exposition of new materialist theory and using sociological examples throughout to enable the reader to develop a materialist sociological understanding, the book: Outlines the fundamental precepts of new materialism Explores how materialism provides new perspectives on the range of sociological topic areas Explains how materialist approaches can be used to research sociological issues and also to engage with social issues. Sociology and the New Materialism is a clear and authoritative one-stop guide for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates in sociology, cultural studies, social policy and related disciplines.

Freedom Summer

Author: Doug McAdam

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195064728

Category: History

Page: 333

View: 3715

Chronicles the experiences of the volunteers who took part in the voter registration and education campaign in Mississippi in 1964, detailing the events of the fateful time, and how this later affected these young workers.

The Risk of Reading

How Literature Helps Us to Understand Ourselves and the World

Author: Robert P. Waxler

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1623568153

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 2392

The Risk of Reading is a defense of the idea that deep and close readings of literature can help us to understand ourselves and the world around us. It explores some of the meaning and implications of modern life through the deep reading of significant books. Waxler argues that we need "fiction" to give our so-called "real life" meaning and that reading narrative fiction remains crucial to the making of a humane and democratic society. Beginning by exploring the implications of thinking about the importance of story in terms of "real life", The Risk of Reading focuses on the importance of human language, especially language shaped into narrative, and how that language is central to the human quest for identity. Waxler argues that we are "linguistic beings," and that reading literary narrative is a significant way to enrich and preserve the traditional sense of human identity and knowledge. This is especially true in the midst of a culture which too often celebrates visual images, spectacle, electronic devices, and celebrity. Reading narrative, in other words, should be considered a counter-cultural activity crucial on the quest to "know thyself." Reading literature is one of the best opportunities we have today to maintain a coherent human identity and remain self-reflective individuals in a world that seems particularly chaotic and confusing. Each chapter takes up a well-known work of nineteenth- or twentieth-century literature in order to discuss more fully these issues, exploring, in particular, the notion of life as a journey or quest and the crucial relationship between language and our contingent everyday existence. Of particular interest along the way is the question of what literary narrative can teach us about our mortality and how stories offer opportunities to reflect on the ambivalent and profound meaning of mortal knowledge.

Our Social World

Introduction to Sociology

Author: Jeanne H. Ballantine,Keith A. Roberts,Kathleen Odell Korgen

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1506362087

Category: Social Science

Page: 664

View: 6417

Inspire your students to develop their sociological imaginations in Our Social World. Focused on deep learning rather than memorization, this book encourages readers to analyze, evaluate, and apply information about the social world; to see the connection between the world and personal events from a new perspective; and to confront sociological issues on a day-to-day basis. Organized around the "Social World Model”, a conceptual framework used across chapters to see the complex links between various micro- to macro-levels of the social system, students will develop the practice of using three levels of analysis, and to view sociology as an integrated whole, rather than a set of discrete subjects.

Getting Wasted

Why College Students Drink Too Much and Party So Hard

Author: Thomas Vander Ven

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814744419

Category: Education

Page: 230

View: 6577

Vander Ven argues that college students rely on "drunk support." Contrary to most accounts of alcohol abuse as being a solitary problem of one person drinking to excess, the college drinking scene is very much a social one where students support one another through nights of drinking games, rituals and rites of passage.

Ten Lessons in Introductory Sociology

Author: Kenneth Alan Gould,Tammy L. Lewis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190663865

Category: Social Science

Page: 356

View: 1379

Designed to introduce students to key concepts and methods in sociology and to engage them in critical thinking, Ten Lessons in Introductory Sociology provides a brief and valuable overview to four major questions that guide the discipline: * Why sociology? * What unites us? * What divides us? * How do societies change? Deftly balancing breadth and depth, the book makes the study of sociology accessible, relevant, and meaningful. Contextualizing the most important issues, Ten Lessons helps students discover "the sociological imagination" and what it means to be part of an engaged public discourse.

Everyday Life in the Gentrifying City

On Displacement, Ethnic Privileging and the Right to Stay Put

Author: Tone Huse

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317138392

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 2339

Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Oslo, Everyday Life in the Gentrifying City offers an examination of gentrification from below, exploring the effects of this process upon city neighbourhoods and those that inhabit them, whether residents, business owners and their customers, or local activists. Engaging with recent debates surrounding immigration and the inclusion of ethnic minorities in the city, the book takes up the question of ethnicity and gentrification. It argues for an urban policy that gives up the preoccupation with policies concerning the residential mix and place transformation in favour of empowering its citizens. A lively and engaging analysis, in which theoretical rigour is illuminated with rich interviews and empirical content in order to shed light on the relationship between gentrification, displacement, and integration, Everyday Life in the Gentrifying City will appeal to scholars and students of sociology, geography, anthropology and urban studies.

Architecture of the Everyday

Author: Deborah Berke,Steven Harris

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 1616891203

Category: Architecture

Page: 240

View: 7289

Ordinary. Banal. Quotidian. These words are rarely used to praise architecture, but in fact they represent the interest of a growing number of architects looking to the everyday to escape the ever-quickening cycles of consumption and fashion that have reduced architecture to a series of stylistic fads. Architecture of the Everyday makes a plea for an architecture that is emphatically un-monumental, anti-heroic, and unconcerned with formal extravagance. Edited by Deborah Berke and Steven Harris, this collection of writings, photo-essays, and projects describes an architecture that draws strength from its simplicity, use of common materials, and relationship to other fields of study. Topics range from a website that explores the politics of domesticity, to a transformation of the sidewalk in Los Angeles' Little Tokyo, to a discussion of the work of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown. Contributors include Margaret Crawford, Peggy Deamer, Deborah Fausch, Ben Gianni and Mark Robbins, Joan Ockman, Ernest Pascucci, Alan Plattus, and Mary-Ann Ray. Deborah Berke and Steven Harris are currently associate professors of architecture at Yale University, and have their own practices in New York City.

Ethnography and the City

Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork

Author: Richard E. Ocejo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415808375

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 846

Previously published articles grouped by the issues they raise in matters of procedure and fieldwork, each group preceded by a chapter dealing with these issues.

The Sociology of Theodor Adorno

Author: Matthias Benzer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139500953

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 2938

Theodor Adorno is a widely-studied figure, but most often with regard to his work on cultural theory, philosophy and aesthetics. The Sociology of Theodor Adorno provides the first thorough English-language account of Adorno's sociological thinking. Matthias Benzer reads Adorno's sociology through six major themes: the problem of conceptualising capitalist society; empirical research; theoretical analysis; social critique; the sociological text; and the question of the non-social. Benzer explains the methodological and theoretical ideas informing Adorno's reflections on sociology and illustrates Adorno's approach to examining social life, including astrology, sexual taboos and racial prejudice. Benzer clarifies Adorno's sociology in relation to his work in other disciplines and the inspiration his sociology took from social thinkers such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Kracauer and Benjamin. The book raises critical questions about the viability of Adorno's sociological mode of procedure and its potential contributions and challenges to current debates in social science.

Neuroscience and Psychology of Meditation in Everyday Life

Searching for the Essence of Mind

Author: Dusana Dorjee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315461951

Category: Psychology

Page: 208

View: 1710

Neuroscience and Psychology of Meditation in Everyday Life addresses essential and timely questions about the research and practice of meditation as a path to realization of human potential for health and well-being.? Balancing practical content and scientific theory, the book discusses long-term effects of six meditation practices: mindfulness, compassion, visualization-based meditation techniques, dream yoga, insight-based meditation and abiding in the existential ground of experience. Each chapter provides advice on how to embed these techniques into everyday activities, together with considerations about underlying changes in the mind and brain based on latest research evidence. This book is essential reading for professionals applying meditation-based techniques in their work and researchers in the emerging field of contemplative science. The book will also be of value to practitioners of meditation seeking to further their practice and understand associated changes in the mind and brain.

Introduction to Corrections

Author: Robert D. Hanser

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1506306772

Category: Social Science

Page: 512

View: 9358

The Second Edition of Introduction to Corrections provides students with a strong, comprehensive foundation in the field of corrections using modern research, theoretical origins, and practical application. Designed for introductory corrections courses, this text uniquely illustrates how the day-to-day practitioner conducts business in the field of corrections, in both the institutional and community settings. Experienced correctional practitioner, scholar, and author, Robert D. Hanser shows students how the corrections system actually works, from classification, to security, to treatment, to demonstrating how and why correctional practices are implemented.

The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life

Author: Elijah Anderson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393340511

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4860

Elijah Anderson, called "one of our best urban ethnographers" by the , introduces the concept of the "cosmopolitan canopy": the urban islands of civility amid segregated ghettos, suburbs, and ethnic enclaves.

Theories of Journalism in a Digital Age

Author: Steen Steensen,Laura Ahva

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134841353

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 470

Given the interdisciplinary nature of digital journalism studies and the increasingly blurred boundaries of journalism, there is a need within the field of journalism studies to widen the scope of theoretical perspectives and approaches. Theories of Journalism in a Digital Age discusses new avenues in theorising journalism, and reassesses established theories. Contributors to this volume describe fresh concepts such as de-differentiation, circulation, news networks, and spatiality to explain journalism in a digital age, and provide concepts which further theorise technology as a fundamental part of journalism, such as actants and materiality. Several chapters discuss the latitude of user positions in the digitalised domain of journalism, exploring maximal–minimal participation, routines–interpretation–agency, and mobility–cross-mediality–participation. Finally, the book provides theoretical tools with which to understand, in different social and cultural contexts, the evolving practices of journalism, including innovation, dispersed gatekeeping, and mediatized interdependency. The chapters in this book were originally published in special issues of Digital Journalism and Journalism Practice.