Spill

Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity

Author: Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373572

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 2358

In Spill, self-described queer Black troublemaker and Black feminist love evangelist Alexis Pauline Gumbs presents a commanding collection of scenes depicting fugitive Black women and girls seeking freedom from gendered violence and racism. In this poetic work inspired by Hortense Spillers, Gumbs offers an alternative approach to Black feminist literary criticism, historiography, and the interactive practice of relating to the words of Black feminist thinkers. Gumbs not only speaks to the spiritual, bodily, and otherworldly experience of Black women but also allows readers to imagine new possibilities for poetry as a portal for understanding and deepening feminist theory.

Spill

Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity

Author: Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822362722

Category: Poetry

Page: 184

View: 3815

In "Spill" poet, independent scholar, and activist Alexis Pauline Gumbs presents a commanding collection of poetry inspired by Black feminist literary critic Hortense Spillers depicting scenes of fugitive Black women and girls seeking freedom from gendered violence and racism.

Spill

Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity

Author: Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822362562

Category: Poetry

Page: 184

View: 1455

In "Spill" poet, independent scholar, and activist Alexis Pauline Gumbs presents a commanding collection of poetry inspired by Black feminist literary critic Hortense Spillers depicting scenes of fugitive Black women and girls seeking freedom from gendered violence and racism.

Revolutionary Mothering

Love on the Front Lines

Author: Mai'a Williams,Loretta Ross

Publisher: PM Press

ISBN: 1629632457

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 8553

An anthology that gives access to the voices of mothers of color and marginalized mothers Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Frontlines is an anthology that centers mothers of color and marginalized mothers' voices—women who are in a world of necessary transformation. The challenges faced by movements working for antiviolence, anti-imperialist, and queer liberation, as well as racial, economic, reproductive, gender, and food justice are the same challenges that marginalized mothers face every day. Motivated to create spaces for this discourse because of the authors' passionate belief in the power of a radical conversation about mothering, they have become the go-to people for cutting-edge inspired work on this topic for an overlapping committed audience of activists, scholars, and writers. Revolutionary Mothering is a movement-shifting anthology committed to birthing new worlds, full of faith and hope for what we can raise up together. Contributors include alba onofrio, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Ariel Gore, Arielle Julia Brown, Autumn Brown, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, China Martens, Christy NaMee Eriksen, Claire Barrera, Cynthia Dewi Oka, Esteli Juarez Boyd, Fabielle Georges, Fabiola Sandoval, Gabriela Sandoval, H. Bindy K. Kang, Irene Lara, June Jordan, Karen Su, Katie Kaput, Layne Russell, Lindsey Campbell, Lisa Factora-Borchers, Loretta J. Ross, Mai'a Williams, Malkia A. Cyril, Mamas of Color Rising, Micaela Cadena, Noemi Martinez, Norma A. Marrun, Panquetzani, Rachel Broadwater, Sumayyah Talibah, Tara CC Villaba, Terri Nilliasca, tk karakashian tunchez, Victoria Law, and Vivian Chin.

M Archive

After the End of the World

Author: Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822370697

Category: Poetry

Page: 248

View: 6273

Engaging with the work of M. Jacqui Alexander and Black feminist thought more generally, Alexis Pauline Gumbs's M Archive is a series of prose poems that speculatively documents the survival of Black people following a worldwide cataclysm while examining the possibilities of being that exceed the human.

Black, White, and in Color

Essays on American Literature and Culture

Author: Hortense J. Spillers

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226769790

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 552

View: 8237

Black, White, and in Color offers a long-awaited collection of major essays by Hortense Spillers, one of the most influential and inspiring black critics of the past twenty years. Spanning her work from the early 1980s, in which she pioneered a broadly poststructuralist approach to African American literature, and extending through her turn to cultural studies in the 1990s, these essays display her passionate commitment to reading as a fundamentally political act-one pivotal to rewriting the humanist project. Spillers is best known for her race-centered revision of psychoanalytic theory and for her subtle account of the relationships between race and gender. She has also given literary criticism some of its most powerful readings of individual authors, represented here in seminal essays on Ralph Ellison, Gwendolyn Brooks, and William Faulkner. Ultimately, the essays collected in Black, White, and in Color all share Spillers's signature style: heady, eclectic, and astonishingly productive of new ideas. Anyone interested in African American culture and literature will want to read them.

Not Just Race, Not Just Gender

Black Feminist Readings

Author: Valerie Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135207917

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 2963

From the nineteenth century articulations of Sojourner Truth to contemporary thinkers like Patricia J. Williams, Black feminists have always recognized the mutual dependence of race and gender. Detailing these connections, Not Just Race, Not Just Gender explores the myriad ways race and gender shape lives and social practices. Resisting essentialist tendencies, Valerie Smith identifies black feminist theorizing as a strategy of reading rather than located in a particular subjective experience. Her intent is not to deny the validity of black women's lived experience, but rather to resist deploying a uniform model of black women's lives that actually undermines the power of black feminist thought. Whether reading race or gender in the Central Park jogger case or in contemporary media, like Livin' Large, Smith displays critical rigor that promises to change the way we think about race and gender.

Black Women, Identity, and Cultural Theory

(un)becoming the Subject

Author: Kevin Everod Quashie

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813533674

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 2687

Kevin Everod Quashie explores the metaphor of the "girlfriend" as a new way of understanding three central concepts of cultural studies: self, memory and language. He considers how the works of writers such as Toni Morrison and Ama Ata Aidoo inform the debates over the concept of identity.

Writing the Black Revolutionary Diva

Women's Subjectivity and the Decolonizing Text

Author: Kimberly Nichele Brown

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253004705

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 294

View: 3351

Kimberly Nichele Brown examines how African American women since the 1970s have found ways to move beyond the "double consciousness" of the colonized text to develop a healthy subjectivity that attempts to disassociate black subjectivity from its connection to white culture. Brown traces the emergence of this new consciousness from its roots in the Black Aesthetic Movement through important milestones such as the anthology The Black Woman and Essence magazine to the writings of Angela Davis, Toni Cade Bambara, and Jayne Cortez.

Demonic Grounds

Black Women And the Cartographies of Struggle

Author: Katherine McKittrick

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 145290880X

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 7058

In a long overdue contribution to geography and social theory, Katherine McKittrick offers a new and powerful interpretation of black women’s geographic thought. In Canada, the Caribbean, and the United States, black women inhabit diasporic locations marked by the legacy of violence and slavery. Analyzing diverse literatures and material geographies, McKittrick reveals how human geographies are a result of racialized connections, and how spaces that are fraught with limitation are underacknowledged but meaningful sites of political opposition. Demonic Grounds moves between past and present, archives and fiction, theory and everyday, to focus on places negotiated by black women during and after the transatlantic slave trade. Specifically, the author addresses the geographic implications of slave auction blocks, Harriet Jacobs’s attic, black Canada and New France, as well as the conceptual spaces of feminism and Sylvia Wynter’s philosophies. Central to McKittrick’s argument are the ways in which black women are not passive recipients of their surroundings and how a sense of place relates to the struggle against domination. Ultimately, McKittrick argues, these complex black geographies are alterable and may provide the opportunity for social and cultural change. Katherine McKittrick is assistant professor of women’s studies at Queen’s University.

No Tea, No Shade

New Writings in Black Queer Studies

Author: E. Patrick Johnson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373718

Category: Social Science

Page: 440

View: 6344

The follow-up to the groundbreaking Black Queer Studies, the edited collection No Tea, No Shade brings together nineteen essays from the next generation of scholars, activists, and community leaders doing work on black gender and sexuality. Building on the foundations laid by the earlier volume, this collection's contributors speak new truths about the black queer experience while exemplifying the codification of black queer studies as a rigorous and important field of study. Topics include "raw" sex, pornography, the carceral state, gentrification, gender nonconformity, social media, the relationship between black feminist studies and black trans studies, the black queer experience throughout the black diaspora, and queer music, film, dance, and theater. The contributors both disprove naysayers who believed black queer studies to be a passing trend and respond to critiques of the field's early U.S. bias. Deferring to the past while pointing to the future, No Tea, No Shade pushes black queer studies in new and exciting directions. Contributors. Jafari S. Allen, Marlon M. Bailey, Zachary Shane Kalish Blair, La Marr Jurelle Bruce, Cathy J. Cohen, Jennifer DeClue, Treva Ellison, Lyndon K. Gill, Kai M. Green, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Kwame Holmes, E. Patrick Johnson, Shaka McGlotten, Amber Jamilla Musser, Alison Reed, Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, Tanya Saunders, C. Riley Snorton, Kaila Story, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, Julia Roxanne Wallace, Kortney Ziegler

Healing Identities

Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups

Author: Cynthia Burack

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801441462

Category: Political Science

Page: 203

View: 7498

Group identifications famously pose the problem of destructive rhetoric and action against others. Cynthia Burack brings together the theory work of women of color and the tools of psychoanalysis to examine the effects of group collaborations for social justice and progressive politics. This juxtaposition illuminates some assumptions about race and equality encoded in psychoanalysis. Burack's discursive analysis suggests the positive, identity-affirming aspects of group relational life for African American women.One analytic response to groups emphasizes the dangers of these identifications and exhorts people to abandon or transcend them for their own good and for the good of others who may be harmed by group-based forms of cultural or material violence. Another response understands that people feel a need for group identifications and asks how they may be made more resistant to malignant group-based discourse and action.What can black feminist thought teach scholars and democratic citizens about groups? Burack shows how the rhetoric of black feminism models reparative, rather than destructive, forms of group dialogue and action. Although it may be impossible to eliminate group identifications that provide much of the impetus for bias and violence, she argues, we can encourage more progressive forms of leadership, solidarity, and coalition politics.

Remaking Black Power

How Black Women Transformed an Era

Author: Ashley D. Farmer

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469634384

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 8235

In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that sexism relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created--the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance--spurred debate among activists over the importance of women and gender to Black Power organizing, causing many of the era's organizations and leaders to critique patriarchy and support gender equality. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.

Changing Our Own Words

Essays on Criticism, Theory, and Writing by Black Women

Author: Cheryl A. Wall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415054614

Category: African American women

Page: 253

View: 730

Writing by and about black women - an activity once regarded as marginal - has become essential to any consideration of the role of literature in society. Black women's writing raises issues of race, class, and gender, and questions the formation of the literary canon, the creation and maintenance of tradition, and the role of the media in controlling perceptions of what matters.

Black Regions of the Imagination

African American Writers Between the Nation and the World

Author: Eve Dunbar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781439909423

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 212

View: 2514

Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Chester Himes have all enlightened mainstream (white) audiences about their race and culture. Focusing on fiction and non-fiction produced between the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, Eve Dunbar's important book, Black Regions of the Imagination examines how these African American writers-who lived and travelled outside the United States-both document and re-imagine their "homegrown" racial experiences within a worldly framework. From Hurston's participant-observational accounts and Wrights' travel writing to Baldwin's Another Country and Himes' detective fiction, these writers helped develop the concept of a "region" of blackness that resists boundaries of genre. Each writer represents-and signifies-blackness in new ways and within the larger context of the world. As they negotiated issues of "belonging," these writers disallowed the privileging of the national or the international, and were more critical of social segregation in America as well as their roles as cultural "translators." A volume in the American Literatures Initiative

Killing the Black Body

Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty

Author: Dorothy Roberts

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804152594

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 4975

The image of the “Welfare Queen” still dominates white America’s perceptions of Black women. It is an image that also continues to shape our government’s policies concerning Black women’s reproductive decisions. Proposed legislation to alleviate poverty focuses on plans to deny benefits to children born to welfare mothers and to require insertion of birth control implants as a condition of receiving aid. Meanwhile a booming fertility industry serves primarily infertile white couples. In Killing the Black Body, Northwestern University professor Dorothy Roberts exposes America’s systemic abuse of Black women’s bodies, from slave masters’ economic stake in bonded women’s fertility to government programs that coerced thousands of poor Black women into being sterilized as late as the 1970s. These abuses, Roberts argues, point not only to the degradation of Black motherhood but to the exclusion of Black women’s reproductive needs from the feminist agenda. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and timely, Killing the Black Body is both a powerful legal argument and a valuable aid for teachers, activists, and policy makers in creating a vision of reproductive freedom that respects each and every American.

Scandalize My Name

Black Feminist Practice and the Making of Black Social Life

Author: Terrion L. Williamson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0823274721

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 4719

"From sapphire, mammy, and jezebel to the angry black woman, baby mama, and nappy-headed ho, black female iconography has had a long and tortured history in public culture. The telling of this history has long occupied the work of black female theorists--much of which has been foundational in situating black women within the matrix of sociopolitical thought and practice in the United States. Scandalize My Name builds upon the rich tradition of this work while taking a detour from conventional stereotype discourse to argue that black social life defies the limitations of representational thought and practice. By approaching the study of black female representation not as a mechanism of negative or positive valuation but as an opening onto a serious contemplation of the vagaries of black social life, Williamson makes a case for a radical black subject position that structures and is structured by an amorphous social order that ultimately destabilizes the very notion of "civil society." At turns memoir, sociological inquiry, literary analysis, and cultural critique, Scandalize My Name explores topics as varied as serial murder, reality television, Christian evangelism, and the novels of Toni Morrison, to advance black feminist practice as a modality through which black sociality is both theorized and made material."

Left of Karl Marx

The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones

Author: Carole Boyce Davies

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822390329

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 8585

In Left of Karl Marx, Carole Boyce Davies assesses the activism, writing, and legacy of Claudia Jones (1915–1964), a pioneering Afro-Caribbean radical intellectual, dedicated communist, and feminist. Jones is buried in London’s Highgate Cemetery, to the left of Karl Marx—a location that Boyce Davies finds fitting given how Jones expanded Marxism-Leninism to incorporate gender and race in her political critique and activism. Claudia Cumberbatch Jones was born in Trinidad. In 1924, she moved to New York, where she lived for the next thirty years. She was active in the Communist Party from her early twenties onward. A talented writer and speaker, she traveled throughout the United States lecturing and organizing. In the early 1950s, she wrote a well-known column, “Half the World,” for the Daily Worker. As the U.S. government intensified its efforts to prosecute communists, Jones was arrested several times. She served nearly a year in a U.S. prison before being deported and given asylum by Great Britain in 1955. There she founded The West Indian Gazette and Afro-Asian Caribbean News and the Caribbean Carnival, an annual London festival that continues today as the Notting Hill Carnival. Boyce Davies examines Jones’s thought and journalism, her political and community organizing, and poetry that the activist wrote while she was imprisoned. Looking at the contents of the FBI file on Jones, Boyce Davies contrasts Jones’s own narration of her life with the federal government’s. Left of Karl Marx establishes Jones as a significant figure within Caribbean intellectual traditions, black U.S. feminism, and the history of communism.

Thiefing Sugar

Eroticism between Women in Caribbean Literature

Author: Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822393061

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 4061

In Thiefing Sugar, Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley explores the poetry and prose of Caribbean women writers, revealing in their imagery a rich tradition of erotic relations between women. She takes the book’s title from Dionne Brand’s novel In Another Place, Not Here, where eroticism between women is likened to the sweet and subversive act of cane cutters stealing sugar. The natural world is repeatedly reclaimed and reinterpreted to express love between women in the poetry and prose that Tinsley analyzes. She not only recuperates stories of Caribbean women loving women, stories that have been ignored or passed over by postcolonial and queer scholarship until now, she also shows how those erotic relations and their literary evocations form a poetics and politics of decolonization. Tinsley’s interpretations of twentieth-century literature by Dutch-, English-, and French-speaking women from the Caribbean take into account colonialism, migration, labor history, violence, and revolutionary politics. Throughout Thiefing Sugar, Tinsley connects her readings to contemporary matters such as neoimperialism and international LGBT and human-rights discourses. She explains too how the texts that she examines intervene in black feminist, queer, and postcolonial studies, particularly when she highlights the cultural limitations of the metaphors that dominate queer theory in North America and Europe, including those of the closet and “coming out.”

Black Feminist Thought

Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment

Author: Patricia Hill Collins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135960135

Category: Social Science

Page: 283

View: 2715

In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known. In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe. She provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, bell hooks, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde. The result is a superbly crafted book that provides the first synthetic overview of Black feminist thought.