Tapestries of Hope, Threads of Love

The Arpillera Movement in Chile

Author: Marjorie Agosín

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742540033

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 6310

Extrait de la couverture : "This book tells the story of ordinary women living in terror and extreme poverty under General Pinochet's oppressive rule in Chile (1973-1989) and how their lives did and did not change following his reign. These women defied the military dictatorship by embroidering their sorrow on scraps of cloth, using needles and thread as one of the boldest means of popular protest and resistance in Latin America. The arpilleras they made--patchwork tapestries with scenes of everyday life and memorials to their disappeared relatives--were smuggled out of Chile and brought to the world the story of their fruitless searches in jails, morgues, government offices, and the tribunals of law for their husbands, brothers, and sons."

Art Against Dictatorship

Making and Exporting Arpilleras Under Pinochet

Author: Jacqueline Adams

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292743823

Category: Political Science

Page: 297

View: 8758

Art can be a powerful avenue of resistance to oppressive governments. During the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, some of the country’s least powerful citizens—impoverished women living in Santiago’s shantytowns—spotlighted the government’s failings and use of violence by creating and selling arpilleras, appliquéd pictures in cloth that portrayed the unemployment, poverty, and repression that they endured, their work to make ends meet, and their varied forms of protest. Smuggled out of Chile by human rights organizations, the arpilleras raised international awareness of the Pinochet regime’s abuses while providing income for the arpillera makers and creating a network of solidarity between the people of Chile and sympathizers throughout the world. Using the Chilean arpilleras as a case study, this book explores how dissident art can be produced under dictatorship, when freedom of expression is absent and repression rife, and the consequences of its production for the resistance and for the artists. Taking a sociological approach based on interviews, participant observation, archival research, and analysis of a visual database, Jacqueline Adams examines the emergence of the arpilleras and then traces their journey from the workshops and homes in which they were made, to the human rights organizations that exported them, and on to sellers and buyers abroad, as well as in Chile. She then presents the perspectives of the arpillera makers and human rights organization staff, who discuss how the arpilleras strengthened the resistance and empowered the women who made them.

Flight from Chile

voices of exile

Author: Thomas C. Wright,Rody Oñate

Publisher: Univ of New Mexico Pr

ISBN: 9780826318916

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 239

View: 1079

The first oral history of those who fled the brutality unleashed by the coup over tewnty-five years ago.

Scraps of Life

Chilean Arpilleras : Chilean Women Under the Pinochet Dictatorship

Author: Marjorie Agosín

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Chile

Page: 154

View: 3029

Making a Killing

Femicide, Free Trade, and La Frontera

Author: Alicia Gaspar de Alba,Georgina Guzmán

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 029272277X

Category: True Crime

Page: 314

View: 3714

Since 1993, more than five hundred women and girls have been murdered in Ciudad Juárez across the border from El Paso, Texas. At least a third have been sexually violated and mutilated as well. Thousands more have been reported missing and remain unaccounted for. The crimes have been poorly investigated and have gone unpunished and unresolved by Mexican authorities, thus creating an epidemic of misogynist violence on an increasingly globalized U.S.-Mexico border. This book, the first anthology to focus exclusively on the Juárez femicides, as the crimes have come to be known, compiles several different scholarly "interventions" from diverse perspectives, including feminism, Marxism, critical race theory, semiotics, and textual analysis. Editor Alicia Gaspar de Alba shapes a multidisciplinary analytical framework for considering the interconnections between gender, violence, and the U.S.-Mexico border. The essays examine the social and cultural conditions that have led to the heinous victimization of women on the border—from globalization, free trade agreements, exploitative maquiladora working conditions, and border politics, to the sexist attitudes that pervade the social discourse about the victims. The book also explores the evolving social movement that has been created by NGOs, mothers' organizing efforts, and other grassroots forms of activism related to the crimes. Contributors include U.S. and Mexican scholars and activists, as well as personal testimonies of two mothers of femicide victims.

The Chile Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Elizabeth Quay Hutchison,Thomas Miller Klubock,Nara B. Milanich,Peter Winn

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822395835

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 8049

The Chile Reader makes available a rich variety of documents spanning more than five hundred years of Chilean history. Most of the selections are by Chileans; many have never before appeared in English. The history of Chile is rendered from diverse perspectives, including those of Mapuche Indians and Spanish colonists, peasants and aristocrats, feminists and military strongmen, entrepreneurs and workers, and priests and poets. Among the many selections are interviews, travel diaries, letters, diplomatic cables, cartoons, photographs, and song lyrics. Texts and images, each introduced by the editors, provide insights into the ways that Chile's unique geography has shaped its national identity, the country's unusually violent colonial history, and the stable but autocratic republic that emerged after independence from Spain. They shed light on Chile's role in the world economy, the social impact of economic modernization, and the enduring problems of deep inequality. The Reader also covers Chile's bold experiments with reform and revolution, its subsequent descent into one of Latin America's most ruthless Cold War dictatorships, and its much-admired transition to democracy and a market economy in the years since dictatorship.

Media, Memory, and Human Rights in Chile

Author: K. Sorensen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230622135

Category: Political Science

Page: 186

View: 2011

Sorensen investigates the manner in which Chilean media and public culture discuss human rights violations committed during the dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990) as well as human rights problems which still exist.

Contesting Legitimacy in Chile

Familial Ideals, Citizenship, and Political Struggle, 1970-1990

Author: Gwynn Thomas

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271048484

Category: Political Science

Page: 274

View: 4509

"Examines the role in Chilean politics during the 1970s and 1980s of cultural beliefs and values surrounding the family. Draws on election propaganda, political speeches, press releases, public service campaigns, magazines, newspaper articles, and televised political advertisements"--Provided by publisher.

Violence at the Urban Margins

Author: Javier Auyero,Philippe Bourgois,Nancy Scheper-Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190221488

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 8355

In the Americas, debates around issues of citizen's public safety--from debates that erupt after highly publicized events, such as the shootings of Jordan Davis and Trayvon Martin, to those that recurrently dominate the airwaves in Latin America--are dominated by members of the middle and upper-middle classes. However, a cursory count of the victims of urban violence in the Americas reveals that the people suffering the most from violence live, and die, at the lowest of the socio-symbolic order, at the margins of urban societies. The inhabitants of the urban margins are hardly ever heard in discussions about public safety. They live in danger but the discourse about violence and risk belongs to, is manufactured and manipulated by, others--others who are prone to view violence at the urban margins as evidence of a cultural, or racial, defect, rather than question violence's relationship to economic and political marginalization. As a result, the experience of interpersonal violence among the urban poor becomes something unspeakable, and the everyday fear and trauma lived in relegated territories is constantly muted and denied. This edited volume seeks to counteract this pernicious tendency by putting under the ethnographic microscope--and making public--the way in which violence is lived and acted upon in the urban peripheries. It features cutting-edge ethnographic research on the role of violence in the lives of the urban poor in South, Central, and North America, and sheds light on the suffering that violence produces and perpetuates, as well as the individual and collective responses that violence generates, among those living at the urban margins of the Americas.

Existential-Integrative Psychotherapy

Guideposts to the Core of Practice

Author: Kirk J. Schneider

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113591835X

Category: Psychology

Page: 368

View: 8938

Existential-Integrative Psychotherapy promises to be a landmark in the fields of psychotherapeutic theory and practice. A comprehensive revision of its predecessor, The Psychology of Existence, co-edited by Kirk Schneider and Rollo May, Existential-Integrative Psychotherapy combines clear and updated guidelines for practice with vivid and timely case vignettes. These vignettes feature the very latest in both mainstream and existential therapeutic integrative application, by the top innovators in the field. The book highlights several notable dimensions: a novel and comprehensive theory of integrative existential practice; a premium on mainstream integrations of existential theory as well as existential-humanistic integrations of mainstream theory; a focus on integrative mainstream as well as existential-humanistic practitioners, students, and theorists; a discussion of short-term and cognitive-behavioral existential-integrative strategies; a focus on ethnic and diagnostic diversity, from case studies of multicultural populations to vignettes on gender, sexuality, and power, and from contributions to the treatment of alcoholism to those elucidating religiosity, psychoses, and intersubjectivity.

Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice

Dignity in Motion

Author: Naomi Jackson,Toni Shapiro-Phim

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810862182

Category: Music

Page: 398

View: 8946

Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Dignity in Motion presents a wide-ranging compilation of essays, spanning more than 15 countries. Organized in four parts, the articles examine the regulation and exploitation of dancers and dance activity by government and authoritative groups, including abusive treatment of dancers within the dance profession; choreography involving human rights as a central theme; the engagement of dance as a means of healing victims of human rights abuses; and national and local social/political movements in which dance plays a powerful role in helping people fight oppression. These groundbreaking papers_both detailed scholarship and riveting personal accounts_encompass a broad spectrum of issues, from slavery and the Holocaust to the Bosnian and Rwandan genocides to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; from First Amendment cases and the AIDS epidemic to discrimination resulting from age, gender, race, and disability. A range of academics, choreographers, dancers, and dance/movement therapists draw connections between refugee camp, courtroom, theater, rehearsal studio, and university classroom.

Memory, Allegory, and Testimony in South American Theater

Upstaging Dictatorship

Author: Ana Elena Puga

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113589924X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 4896

Memory, Allegory, and Testimony in South American Theater traces the shaping of a resistant identity in memory, its direct expression in testimony, and its indirect elaboration in two different kinds of allegory. Each chapter focuses on one contemporary playwright (or one collaborative team, in the case of Brazil) from each of four Southern Cone countries and compares the playwrights’ aesthetic strategies for subverting ideologies of dictatorship: Carlos Manuel Varela (memory in Uruguay), Juan Radrigán (testimony in Chile), Augusto Boal and his co-author Gianfrancesco Guarnieri (historical allegory in Brazil), Griselda Gambaro (abstract allegory in Argentina).

Imagination Beyond Nation

Latin American Popular Culture

Author: Eva Bueno,Terry Caesar

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 082299058X

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 1269

An exploration in verse of rites of passage within the Cuban-American culture shows how a combined nostalgia for a lost world and a daily confrontation with American culture leads to self-awareness

Fray

Art and Textile Politics

Author: Julia Bryan-Wilson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022636982X

Category: Art

Page: 296

View: 5119

In 1974, women in a feminist consciousness-raising group in Eugene, Oregon, formed a mock organization called the Ladies Sewing Circle and Terrorist Society. Emblazoning its logo onto t-shirts, the group wryly envisioned female collective textile making as a practice that could upend conventions, threaten state structures, and wreak political havoc. Elaborating on this example as a prehistory to the more recent phenomenon of “craftivism”—the politics and social practices associated with handmaking—Fray explores textiles and their role at the forefront of debates about process, materiality, gender, and race in times of economic upheaval. Closely examining how amateurs and fine artists in the United States and Chile turned to sewing, braiding, knotting, and quilting amid the rise of global manufacturing, Julia Bryan-Wilson argues that textiles unravel the high/low divide and urges us to think flexibly about what the politics of textiles might be. Her case studies from the 1970s through the 1990s—including the improvised costumes of the theater troupe the Cockettes, the braided rag rugs of US artist Harmony Hammond, the thread-based sculptures of Chilean artist Cecilia Vicuña, the small hand-sewn tapestries depicting Pinochet’s torture, and the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt—are often taken as evidence of the inherently progressive nature of handcrafted textiles. Fray, however, shows that such methods are recruited to often ambivalent ends, leaving textiles very much “in the fray” of debates about feminized labor, protest cultures, and queer identities; the malleability of cloth and fiber means that textiles can be activated, or stretched, in many ideological directions. The first contemporary art history book to discuss both fine art and amateur registers of handmaking at such an expansive scale, Fray unveils crucial insights into how textiles inhabit the broad space between artistic and political poles—high and low, untrained and highly skilled, conformist and disobedient, craft and art.

A Short History of U.S. Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author: Alan McPherson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118954009

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 5567

A Short History of U.S. Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean presents a concise account of the full sweep of U.S. military invasions and interventions in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean from 1800 up to the present day. Engages in debates about the economic, military, political, and cultural motives that shaped U.S. interventions in Cuba, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Guatemala, Mexico, and elsewhere Deals with incidents that range from the taking of Florida to the Mexican War, the War of 1898, the Veracruz incident of 1914, the Bay of Pigs, and the 1989 invasion of Panama Features also the responses of Latin American countries to U.S. involvement Features unique coverage of 19th century interventions as well as 20th century incidents, and includes a series of helpful maps and illustrations

Violeta Parra

By the Whim of the Wind

Author: Karen Kerschen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780984302413

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 285

View: 1019

Violeta Parra: By The Whim of the Wind is a biography about Chile's legendary musician and artist who championed her nation's rustic customs, songs and dances against a current of modernization. She left a legacy of topical songs and new respect for the dignity of humble roots. As a visual artist, Violeta Parra was the first Latin American to merit a solo exhibit in the Louvre. A woman of great passion, she paid for her choices tragically. Violeta Parra's story captivated Karen Kerschen when she was caught in the Chilean coup d'etat, September 11, 1973, and forced to flee. A New Yorker by birth, Kerschen's lifelong interest in the threads of folkloric culture date back to childhood stories of her family's emigration from Eastern Europe. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in NYC and worked in both humanities and technology. Kerschen now lives with her husband in rural northern New Mexico.

Piecework

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fancy work

Page: N.A

View: 8118

The Penguin History Of Latin America

New Edition

Author: Edwin Williamson

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141937440

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 4249

Now fully updated to 2009, this acclaimed history of Latin America tells its turbulent story from Columbus to Chavez. Beginning with the Spanish and Portugese conquests of the New World, it takes in centuries of upheaval, revolution and modernization up to the present day, looking in detail at Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Chile and Cuba, and gives an overview of the cultural developments that have made Latin America a source of fascination for the world. 'A first-rate work of history ... His cool, scholarly gaze and synthesizing intelligence demystify a part of the world peculiarly prone to myth-making ... This book covers an enormous amount of ground, geographically and culturally' Tony Gould, Independent on Sunday

A Social History of the Catholic Church in Chile: The first period of the Pinochet government, 1973-1980

Author: Mario I. Aguilar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780773462458

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 4488

This first volume of a social history of the Catholic Church in Chile describes and interprets the historiography of bishops, priests, religious, Christian communities and lay people during the years 1973-1980 by the use of ecclesiastical primary sources and oral testimonies. In 1973 Augusto Pinochet led a military coup that had enormous repercussions for the history of Chile and for the pastoral actions of the Catholic Church led by Cardinal Silva Henriquez. This book examines the historiography of the period in the context of the universal church, the Latin American churches and the development of a very strong network of parish communities that sheltered the persecuted and defended the right of the Church to speak against a totalitarian state. Its author has used a significantly large number of unpublished and unknown primary historical sources that make this volume the most significant historical work in English for the history of the Chilean Church from the military coup to the approval of the new Chilean Constitution in 1980. findings of human remains of political prisoners at Lonquen and it analyses the role of the Church within that social process.