The Anthropology of China

China as Ethnographic and Theoretical Critique

Author: Charlotte Bruckermann,Stephan Feuchtwang

Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company

ISBN: 1783269855

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 3786

Putting China into the context of general anthropology offers novel insights into its history, culture and society. Studies in the anthropology of China need to look outwards, to other anthropological areas, while at the same time, anthropologists specialised elsewhere cannot afford to ignore contributions from China. This book introduces a number of key themes and in each case describes how the anthropology and ethnography of China relates to the surrounding theories and issues. The themes chosen include the anthropology of intimacy, of morality, of food and of feasting, as well as the anthropology of civilisation, modernity and the state. The Anthropology of China covers both long historical perspectives and ethnographies of the twenty-first century. For the first time, ethnographic perspectives on China are contextualised in comparison with general anthropological debates. Readers are invited to engage in and rethink China's place within the wider world, making it perfect for professional researchers and teachers of anthropology and Chinese history and society, and for advanced undergraduate and graduate study.

The Anthropology of China

China as Ethnographic and Theoretical Critique

Author: Stephan Feuchtwang,Charlotte Bruckermann

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781783269822

Category: Anthropology

Page: 279

View: 4526

Introduction -- Anthropology of China : history, regionalism and comparison -- Kinship as ideology and as corporation -- Relatedness and gender -- Love, emotion and sentiment -- The exchange of money, gifts and favours -- The localization and globalization of food -- Nature, environment and activism -- Ritual and belief -- Hospitality -- The stranger king and the outside of an imperial civilisation -- The anthropology of the modern state in China -- Conclusion

Communities of Complicity

Everyday Ethics in Rural China

Author: Hans Steinm

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857458914

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 732

Everyday life in contemporary rural China is characterized by an increased sense of moral challenge and uncertainty. Ordinary people often find themselves caught between the moral frameworks of capitalism, Maoism and the Chinese tradition. This ethnographic study of the village of Zhongba (in Hubei Province, central China) is an attempt to grasp the ethical reflexivity of everyday life in rural China. Drawing on descriptions of village life, interspersed with targeted theoretical analyses, the author examines how ordinary people construct their own senses of their lives and their futures in everyday activities: building houses, working, celebrating marriages and funerals, gambling and dealing with local government. The villagers confront moral uncertainty; they creatively harmonize public discourse and local practice; and sometimes they resolve incoherence and unease through the use of irony. In so doing, they perform everyday ethics and re-create transient moral communities at a time of massive social dislocation.

The Allure of Capitalism

An Ethnography of Management and the Global Economy in Crisis

Author: Emil A. Røyrvik

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857451863

Category: Political Science

Page: 284

View: 1754

The "managerial revolution," or the rise of management as a distinct and vital group in industrial society, might be identified as a major development of the modernization processes, similar to the scientific and industrial revolutions. Studying "transnational" or "global" corporate management at the post-millennium moment provides a suitable focal point from which to investigate globalized (post)modernity and capitalism especially, and as such this book offers an anthropology of global capitalism at its moment of crisis. This study provides ethnographically rich descriptions of managerial practices in a set of international corporate investment projects. Drawing also on historical and statistical data, it renders a comprehensive perspective on management, corporations, and capitalism in the late modern globalized economy. Cross-disciplinary in outlook, the book spans the fields of organization, business, and management, and asserts that now, in this period of financial crisis, is the time for anthropology to yet again engage with political economy.

Anthropologies of Education

A Global Guide to Ethnographic Studies of Learning and Schooling

Author: Kathryn M. Anderson-Levitt

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857452746

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 8095

Despite international congresses and international journals, anthropologies of education differ significantly around the world. Linguistic barriers constrain the flow of ideas, which results in a vast amount of research on educational anthropology that is not published in English or is difficult for international readers to find. This volume responds to the call to attend to educational research outside the United States and to break out of "metropolitan provincialism." A guide to the anthropologies and ethnographies of learning and schooling published in German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Slavic languages, Japanese, and English as a second language, show how scholars in Latin America, Japan, and elsewhere adapt European, American, and other approaches to create new traditions. As the contributors show, educators draw on different foundational research and different theoretical discussions. Thus, this global survey raises new questions and casts a new light on what has become a too-familiar discipline in the United States.

Bitter and Sweet

Food, Meaning, and Modernity in Rural China

Author: Ellen Oxfeld

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520293525

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 3460

Less than a half century ago, China experienced a cataclysmic famine, which was particularly devastating in the countryside. As a result, older people in rural areas have experienced in their lifetimes both extreme deprivation and relative abundance of food. Young people, on the other hand, have a different relationship to food. Many young rural Chinese are migrating to rapidly industrializing cities for work, leaving behind backbreaking labor but also a connection to food through agriculture. Bitter and Sweet examines the role of food in one rural Chinese community as it has shaped everyday lives over the course of several tumultuous decades. In her superb ethnographic accounts, Ellen Oxfeld compels us to reexamine some of the dominant frameworks that have permeated recent scholarship on contemporary China and that describe increasing dislocation and individualism and a lack of moral centeredness. By using food as a lens, she shows a more complex picture, where connectedness and sense of place continue to play an important role, even in the context of rapid change.

After the Event

The Transmission of Grievous Loss in Germany, China and Taiwan

Author: Stephan Feuchtwang

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857450875

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 3397

Two of the most destructive moments of state violence in the twentieth century occurred in Europe between 1933 and 1945 and in China between 1959 and 1961 (the Great Leap famine). This is the first book to bring the two histories together in order to examine their differences and to understand if there are any similar processes of transmission at work. The author expertly ties in the Taiwanese civil war between Nationalists and Communists, which included the White Terror from 1947 to 1987, a less well-known but equally revealing part of twentieth-century history. Personal and family stories are told, often in the individual's own words, and then compared with the public accounts of the same events as found in official histories, commemorations, school textbooks and other forms of public memory. The author presents innovative and constructive criticisms of social memory theories in order to make sense both of what happened and how what happened is transmitted.

China Urban

Ethnographies of Contemporary Culture

Author: Nancy N. Chen,Constance D. Clark,Suzanne Z. Gottschang,Lyn Jeffery

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822381338

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 534

China Urban is an ethnographic account of China’s cities and the place that urban space holds in China’s imagination. In addition to investigating this nation’s rapidly changing urban landscape, its contributors emphasize the need to rethink the very meaning of the “urban” and the utility of urban-focused anthropological critiques during a period of unprecedented change on local, regional, national, and global levels. Through close attention to everyday lives and narratives and with a particular focus on gender, market, and spatial practices, this collection stresses that, in the case of China, rural life and the impact of socialism must be considered in order to fully comprehend the urban. Individual essays note the impact of legal barriers to geographic mobility in China, the proliferation of different urban centers, the different distribution of resources among various regions, and the pervasive appeal of the urban, both in terms of living in cities and in acquiring products and conventions signaling urbanity. Others focus on the direct sales industry, the Chinese rock music market, the discursive production of femininity and motherhood in urban hospitals, and the transformations in access to healthcare. China Urban will interest anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists, and those studying urban planning, China, East Asia, and globalization. Contributors. Tad Ballew, Susan Brownell, Nancy N. Chen, Constance D. Clark, Robert Efird, Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Ellen Hertz, Lisa Hoffman, Sandra Hyde, Lyn Jeffery, Lida Junghans, Louisa Schein, Li Zhang

The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia

Author: Shinji Yamashita,Joseph Bosco,Jeremy Seymour Eades

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571812599

Category: Social Science

Page: 374

View: 8477

In a path-breaking series of essays the contributors to this collection explore the development of anthropological research in Asia. The volume includes writings on Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines.

The Anthropology of Citizenship

A Reader

Author: Sian Lazar

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 1118412915

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 4353

The Anthropology of Citizenship introduces thetheoretical foundations of and cutting edge approaches tocitizenship in the contemporary world, in local, national andglobal contexts. Key readings provide a cross-cultural perspectiveon citizenship practices, and an individual citizen’srelationship with the state. Introduces a range of exciting and cutting edge approaches tocitizenship in the contemporary world Provides key readings for students and researchers who wish togain an understanding of citizenship practices, and anindividual’s relationship with the state in a globalcontext Offers an anthropological perspective on citizenship, the selfand political agency, with a focus on encounters between citizensand the state in education, law, development, and immigrationpolicy Provides students with an understanding of the theoreticalfoundations of citizenship, as characterized by liberal and civicrepublican ideas of political belonging and exclusion Explores how citizenship is constructed at different scales andin different spaces Twenty-five key writings identify what is a new and vibrantsubfield within politics and anthropological research

Stigma

An Ethnography of Mental Illness and HIV/AIDS in China

Author: Jinhua Guo

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 1938134826

Category: Medical

Page: 264

View: 408

Based on two and a half years of fieldwork in China, this book examines the cultural genesis and social mechanisms of stigma related to mental illness and HIV/AIDS in China. It also explores the bio-politics on stigma through detailed description of social exclusion experienced by people suffering from mental illness or HIV/AIDS and by systematic comparison on stigma between the two illnesses in the Chinese context. Through the comparison, this book describes the micro socio-dynamic process of stigmatization in the local Chinese context, highlights the identity transformation accompanying the illness trajectory the patients and their families have lived through, and ultimately connects Chinese society and its community-centered social value system and institutional arrangement to the stigma associated with mental illness and HIV/AIDS. Contents:Theoretical Reviews and CritiquesEthnography of Stigma Associated with Mental IllnessEthnography of Stigma Associated with HIV/AIDS in BeijingEthnography of Stigma Associated with HIV/AIDS in YunnanA Comparative PerspectiveConclusion Readership: Readers who are interested in learning more about the cultural genesis and social mechnism related to mental illness and HIV/AIDS in China, and how they connect with the Chinese society and the social values in general. Key Features:One of the first stigma studies on mental illness and HIV/AIDS in ChinaOne of the first ethnographies on the living conditions of people suffering from mental illness and HIV/AIDS in ChinaCombines social and cultural construction perspectives on stigmaKeywords:Stigma;Ethnography;Mental Illness;HIV/AIDS;China;Chinese Society;Social Issues

Other-Worldly

Making Chinese Medicine through Transnational Frames

Author: Mei Zhan

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822392135

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 4654

Traditional Chinese medicine is often portrayed as an enduring system of therapeutic knowledge that has become globalized in recent decades. In Other-Worldly, Mei Zhan argues that the discourses and practices called “traditional Chinese medicine” are made through, rather than prior to, translocal encounters and entanglements. Zhan spent a decade following practitioners, teachers, and advocates of Chinese medicine through clinics, hospitals, schools, and grassroots organizations in Shanghai and the San Francisco Bay Area. Drawing on that ethnographic research, she demonstrates that the everyday practice of Chinese medicine is about much more than writing herbal prescriptions and inserting acupuncture needles. “Traditional Chinese medicine” is also made and remade through efforts to create a preventive medicine for the “proletariat world,” reinvent it for cosmopolitan middle-class aspirations, produce clinical “miracles,” translate knowledge and authority, and negotiate marketing strategies and medical ethics. Whether discussing the presentation of Chinese medicine at a health fair sponsored by a Silicon Valley corporation, or how the inclusion of a traditional Chinese medicine clinic authenticates the “California” appeal of an upscale residential neighborhood in Shanghai, Zhan emphasizes that unexpected encounters and interactions are not anomalies in the structure of Chinese medicine. Instead, they are constitutive of its irreducibly complex and open-ended worlds. Zhan proposes an ethnography of “worlding” as an analytic for engaging and illuminating emergent cultural processes such as those she describes. Rather than taking “cultural difference” as the starting point for anthropological inquiries, this analytic reveals how various terms of difference—for example, “traditional,” “Chinese,” and “medicine”—are invented, negotiated, and deployed translocally. Other-Worldly is a theoretically innovative and ethnographically rich account of the worlding of Chinese medicine.

Anxious Wealth

Money and Morality Among China's New Rich

Author: John Osburg

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 080478535X

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 3591

Who exactly are China's new rich? This pioneering investigation introduces readers to the private lives—and the nightlives—of the powerful entrepreneurs and managers redefining success and status in the city of Chengdu. Over the course of more than three years, anthropologist John Osburg accompanied, and in some instances assisted, wealthy Chinese businessmen as they courted clients, partners, and government officials. Drawing on his immersive experiences, Osburg invites readers to join him as he journeys through the new, highly gendered entertainment sites for Chinese businessmen, including karaoke clubs, saunas, and massage parlors—places specifically designed to cater to the desires and enjoyment of elite men. Within these spaces, a masculinization of business is taking place. Osburg details the complex code of behavior that governs businessmen as they go about banqueting, drinking, gambling, bribing, exchanging gifts, and obtaining sexual services. These intricate social networks play a key role in generating business, performing social status, and reconfiguring gender roles. But many entrepreneurs feel trapped by their obligations and moral compromises in this evolving environment. Ultimately, Osburg examines their deep ambivalence about China's future and their own complicity in the major issues of post-Mao Chinese society—corruption, inequality, materialism, and loss of trust.

In Search of Paradise

Middle-class Living in a Chinese Metropolis

Author: Li Zhang

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801458196

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 310

A new revolution in homeownership and living has been sweeping the booming cities of China. This time the main actors on the social stage are not peasants, migrants, or working-class proletariats but middle-class professionals and entrepreneurs in search of a private paradise in a society now dominated by consumerism. No longer seeking happiness and fulfillment through collective sacrifice and socialist ideals, they hope to find material comfort and social distinction in newly constructed gated communities. This quest for the good life is profoundly transforming the physical and social landscapes of urban China. Li Zhang, who is from Kunming, the capital of Yunnan province, turns a keen ethnographic eye on her hometown. She combines her analysis of larger political and social issues with fine-grained details about the profound spatial, cultural, and political effects of the shift in the way Chinese urban residents live their lives and think about themselves. In Search of Paradise is a deeply informed account of how the rise of private homeownership is reconfiguring urban space, class subjects, gender selfhood, and ways of life in the reform era. New, seemingly individualistic lifestyles mark a dramatic move away from yearning for a social utopia under Maoist socialism. Yet the privatization of property and urban living have engendered a simultaneous movement of public engagement among homeowners as they confront the encroaching power of the developers. This double movement of privatized living and public sphere activism, Zhang finds, is a distinctive feature of the cultural politics of the middle classes in contemporary China. Theoretically sophisticated and highly accessible, Zhang's account will appeal not only to those interested in China but also to anyone interested in spatial politics, middle-class culture, and postsocialist governing in a globalizing world.

A Landscape of Travel

The Work of Tourism in Rural Ethnic China

Author: Jenny Chio

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295993669

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 5710

Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in Pingan (a Zhuang village in Guangxi) and Upper Jidao (a Miao village in Guizhou), Jenny Chio analyzes the myriad challenges and possibilities confronted by villagers who are called upon to do the work of tourism. She addresses the shifting significance of migration and rural mobility, the visual politics of tourist photography, and the effects of touristic desires for "exotic difference" on village social relations. In this way, Chio illuminates the contemporary regimes of labor and leisure and the changing imagination of what it means to be rural, ethnic, and modern in China today. Jenny Chio is assistant professor of anthropology and associated faculty in film and media studies at Emory University. A Landscape of Travel is about China becoming a nation that travels, and one way of traveling is to be a tourist.

A Companion to the Anthropology of Education

Author: Bradley A. Levinson,Mica Pollock

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119111668

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 7509

A Companion to the Anthropology of Education presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of the field, exploring the social and cultural dimension of educational processes in both formal and nonformal settings. Explores theoretical and applied approaches to cultural practice in a diverse range of educational settings around the world, in both formal and non-formal contexts Includes contributions by leading educational anthropologists Integrates work from and on many different national systems of scholarship, including China, the United States, Africa, the Middle East, Colombia, Mexico, India, the United Kingdom, and Denmark Examines the consequences of history, cultural diversity, language policies, governmental mandates, inequality, and literacy for everyday educational processes

Other Chinas

The Yao and the Politics of National Belonging

Author: Ralph A. Litzinger

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822325499

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 5943

An ethnographic study of how ethnic minorities negotiate Chinese nationalism in post-Mao China.

Made in China

Women Factory Workers in a Global Workplace

Author: Pun Ngai

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822386755

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 9732

As China has evolved into an industrial powerhouse over the past two decades, a new class of workers has developed: the dagongmei, or working girls. The dagongmei are women in their late teens and early twenties who move from rural areas to urban centers to work in factories. Because of state laws dictating that those born in the countryside cannot permanently leave their villages, and familial pressure for young women to marry by their late twenties, the dagongmei are transient labor. They undertake physically exhausting work in urban factories for an average of four or five years before returning home. The young women are not coerced to work in the factories; they know about the twelve-hour shifts and the hardships of industrial labor. Yet they are still eager to leave home. Made in China is a compelling look at the lives of these women, workers caught between the competing demands of global capitalism, the socialist state, and the patriarchal family. Pun Ngai conducted ethnographic work at an electronics factory in southern China’s Guangdong province, in the Shenzhen special economic zone where foreign-owned factories are proliferating. For eight months she slept in the employee dormitories and worked on the shop floor alongside the women whose lives she chronicles. Pun illuminates the workers’ perspectives and experiences, describing the lure of consumer desire and especially the minutiae of factory life. She looks at acts of resistance and transgression in the workplace, positing that the chronic pains—such as backaches and headaches—that many of the women experience are as indicative of resistance to oppressive working conditions as they are of defeat. Pun suggests that a silent social revolution is underway in China and that these young migrant workers are its agents.

Beyond the Body Proper

Reading the Anthropology of Material Life

Author: Margaret M. Lock,Judith Farquhar

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822338451

Category: Social Science

Page: 688

View: 3618

A theoretically sophisticated and cross-disciplinary reader in the anthropology of the body.

Ornament and Order

Graffiti, Street Art and the Parergon

Author: Rafael Schacter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317085000

Category: Architecture

Page: 312

View: 6304

Over the last forty years, graffiti and street-art have become a global phenomenon within the visual arts. Whilst they have increasingly been taken seriously by the art establishment (or perhaps the art market), their academic and popular examination still remains within old debates which argue over whether these acts are vandalism or art, and which examine the role of graffiti in gang culture and in terms of visual pollution. Based on an in-depth ethnographic study working with some of the world’s most influential Independent Public Artists, this book takes a completely new approach. Placing these illicit aesthetic practices within a broader historical, political, and aesthetic context, it argues that they are in fact both intrinsically ornamental (working within a classic architectonic framework), as well as innately ordered (within a highly ritualized, performative structure). Rather than disharmonic, destructive forms, rather than ones solely working within the dynamics of the market, these insurgent images are seen to reface rather than deface the city, operating within a modality of contemporary civic ritual. The book is divided into two main sections, Ornament and Order. Ornament focuses upon the physical artifacts themselves, the various meanings these public artists ascribe to their images as well as the tensions and communicative schemata emerging out of their material form. Using two very different understandings of political action, it places these illicit icons within the wider theoretical debate over the public sphere that they materially re-present. Order is focused more closely on the ephemeral trace of these spatial acts, the explicitly performative, practice-based elements of their aesthetic production. Exploring thematics such as carnival and play, risk and creativity, it tracks how the very residue of this cultural production structures and shapes the socio-ethico guidelines of these artists’ lifeworlds.