The Big Disconnect

Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age

Author: Catherine Steiner-Adair, EdD.,Teresa H. Barker

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062082442

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 384

View: 2904

Have iPads replaced conversation at the dinner table? What do infants observe when their parents are on their smartphones? Should you be your child's Facebook friend? As the focus of family has turned to the glow of the screen—children constantly texting their friends, parents working online around the clock—everyday life is undergoing a massive transformation. Easy availability to the Internet and social media has erased the boundaries that protect children from the unsavory aspects of adult life. Parents often feel they are losing a meaningful connection with their children. Children are feeling lonely and alienated. The digital world is here to stay, but what are families losing with technology's gain? As renowned clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair explains, families are in crisis around this issue, and even more so than they realize. Not only do chronic tech distractions have deep and lasting effects, but children desperately need parents to provide what tech cannot: close, significant interactions with the adults in their lives. Drawing on real-life stories from her clinical work with children and parents, and her consulting work with educators and experts across the country, Steiner-Adair offers insights and advice that can help parents achieve greater under-standing, authority, and confidence as they come up against the tech revolution unfolding in their living rooms. We all know that deep connection with the people we love means everything to us. It's time to look with fresh eyes and an open mind at the disconnection we are experiencing from our extreme device dependence. It's never too late to put down the iPad and come to the dinner table.

The Big Disconnect

Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age

Author: Catherine Steiner-Adair, EdD.,Teresa H. Barker

Publisher: Harper Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780062082435

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 384

View: 4427

As the focus of the family has turned to the glow of the screen—children constantly texting their friends or going online to do homework; parents working online around the clock—everyday life is undergoing a massive transformation. Easy access to the Internet and social media has erased the boundaries that protect children from damaging exposure to excessive marketing and the unsavory aspects of adult culture. Parents often feel they are losing a meaningful connection with their children. Children are feeling lonely and alienated. The digital world is here to stay, but what are families losing with technology's gain? As renowned clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair explains, families are in crisis as they face this issue, and even more so than they realize. Not only do chronic tech distractions have deep and lasting effects but children also desperately need parents to provide what tech cannot: close, significant interactions with the adults in their lives. Drawing on real-life stories from her clinical work with children and parents and her consulting work with educators and experts across the country, Steiner-Adair offers insights and advice that can help parents achieve greater understanding, authority, and confidence as they engage with the tech revolution unfolding in their living rooms.

The Big Disconnect

Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age

Author: Catherine Steiner-Adair, EdD.,Teresa H. Barker

Publisher: Harper

ISBN: 9780062082428

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 384

View: 3788

Have iPads replaced conversation at the dinner table? What do infants observe when their parents are on their smartphones? Should you be your child's Facebook friend? As the focus of family has turned to the glow of the screen—children constantly texting their friends, parents working online around the clock—everyday life is undergoing a massive transformation. Easy availability to the Internet and social media has erased the boundaries that protect children from the unsavory aspects of adult life. Parents often feel they are losing a meaningful connection with their children. Children are feeling lonely and alienated. The digital world is here to stay, but what are families losing with technology's gain? As renowned clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair explains, families are in crisis around this issue, and even more so than they realize. Not only do chronic tech distractions have deep and lasting effects, but children desperately need parents to provide what tech cannot: close, significant interactions with the adults in their lives. Drawing on real-life stories from her clinical work with children and parents, and her consulting work with educators and experts across the country, Steiner-Adair offers insights and advice that can help parents achieve greater under-standing, authority, and confidence as they come up against the tech revolution unfolding in their living rooms. We all know that deep connection with the people we love means everything to us. It's time to look with fresh eyes and an open mind at the disconnection we are experiencing from our extreme device dependence. It's never too late to put down the iPad and come to the dinner table.

Raising Children in a Digital Age

Enjoying the best, avoiding the worst

Author: Bex Lewis

Publisher: Lion Books

ISBN: 0745957552

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 256

View: 1917

Twitter, Facebook, blogging, chat rooms, email, the internet and beyond - for most parents, teachers and youth workers, getting to grips with new technology is a bit of a challenge. But keeping children safe is a much bigger one. As technology changes, and young people grasp it faster than the older generations do, it can be a real struggle to know what to do to help, equip and defend. Dr Bex Lewis is an expert in new technology. She knows how it works, what to do and where to go for the latest information. It is rarely possible to keep young people away from new technology, nor is it wise. This book will enable parents, teachers and youth workers to give young people the equipment they need to get the best out of new technology and to avoid the dangers. For more information visit www.lionhudson.com/drbex

Big Disconnect

The Story of Technology and Loneliness

Author: Giles Slade

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 161614596X

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 8157

Smart phones and social media sites may be contemporary fixations, but using technology to replace face-to-face interactions is not a new cultural phenomenon. Throughout our history, intimacy with machines has often supplanted mutual human connection. This book reveals how consumer technologies changed from analgesic devices that soothed the loneliness of a newly urban generation to prosthetic interfaces that act as substitutes for companionship in modern America. The history of this transformation helps explain why we use technology to mediate our connections with other human beings instead of seeking out face-to-face contact. Do electronic interfaces receive most of our attention to the detriment of real interpersonal communication? Why do sixty million Americans report that isolation and loneliness are major sources of unhappiness? The author provides many insights into our increasingly artificial relationships and a vision for how we can rediscover genuine community and human empathy. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Full of Ourselves

A Wellness Program to Advance Girl Power, Health, and Leadership

Author: Catherine Steiner-Adair,Lisa Sjostrom

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807746318

Category: Education

Page: 139

View: 8396

This dynamic health-and-wellness education program was developed at the Harvard Medical School by a leading clinician and an acclaimed curriculum designer. It addresses critical issues of body preoccupation and reduces risk for disordered eating in girls (grades 3-8). Emphasizing girls' personal power and overall mental and physical well-being, Full of Ourselves contains a range of upbeat units that foster: increased self and body acceptance; healthier eating and exercise habits; leadership and media literacy skills; and a range of coping skills for resisting unhealthy peer and cultural pressures. Each unit ends with a "Call to Action" to help girls translate their new-found knowledge into positive action at school, home, and in their community. Older girls are trained as peer leaders and given the opportunity to pass along their learning to younger peers. Evaluated with more than 800 girls, this primary prevention curriculum is the first of its kind to show sustained, positive changes in girls' body image, body satisfaction, and body esteem. Educators, health professionals, counselors, and parents will find Full of Ourselves the ideal resource for helping girls make healthy choices for themselves.

Cyber Effect

An Expert in Cyberpsychology Explains how Technology is Shaping Our Children, Our Behavior, and Our Values--and what We Can Do about it

Author: Mary Aiken

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0812987470

Category: Psychology

Page: 400

View: 1528

Originally published in hardcover in 2016.

Plugged-In Parenting

How to Raise Media-Savvy Kids with Love, Not War

Author: Bob Waliszewski

Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

ISBN: 9781604828085

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 6453

Plugged-In Parenting comes at a time when parents find themselves between a rock and a hard place. They want to protect their children from the increasingly violent and sexualized content of movies, TV, the Internet, and music as well as cyberbullying and obsessive cell phone texting. But they fear that simply “laying down the law” will alienate their kids. Can parents stay connected to the media while staying connected to God and to each other? This book makes a powerful case for teaching kids media discernment, but doesn’t stop there. It shows how to use teachable moments, evidence from research and pop culture, Scripture, questions, parental example, and a written family entertainment constitution to uphold biblical standards without damaging the parent-child relationship.

Screen-Smart Parenting

How to Find Balance and Benefit in Your Child's Use of Social Media, Apps, and Digital Devices

Author: Jodi Gold

Publisher: Guilford Publications

ISBN: 1462518796

Category: Psychology

Page: 314

View: 1889

As a practicing child psychiatrist and mother of three, Jodi Gold has a unique understanding of both the mind-boggling benefits and the serious downsides of technology. Dr. Gold weaves together scientific knowledge and everyday practical advice to help you foster your child's healthy relationship to technology, from birth to the teen years. You'll learn: *How much screen time is too much at different ages. *What your kids and teens are actually doing in all those hours online. *How technology affects social, emotional, and cognitive development. *Which apps and games build smarts and let creativity shine. *How your own media habits influence your children. *What you need to know about privacy concerns, cyberbullying, and other dangers. *Ways to set limits that the whole family can live with. Winner (Second Place)—American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award, Child Health Category

Media Moms & Digital Dads

A Fact-Not-Fear Approach to Parenting in the Digital Age

Author: Yalda Uhls

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351861387

Category: Psychology

Page: 240

View: 2248

Is social media ruining our kids? How much Internet activity is too much? What do FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), sexting, and selfies mean for teens? Are you curious about what research says about how media and technology are affecting childhood? Supported by academic research focused on technology, Media Moms & Digital Dads breaks down complex issues in a friendly, accessible fashion, making it a highly useful and, ultimately, reassuring read for anyone who worries about the impact that media might be having on young minds. Each chapter delves into a different issue related to kids and media so parents can easily find their particular issue of concern. Dr. Uhls ends each chapter with quick takeaways, in the form of tips and guidance for parents. Dr. Uhls' expertise as a former Hollywood film executive and as a current expert on child development and the media gives her a unique and important perspective. As a trained scientist she understands the myriad studies conducted by researchers, and as a mom of digital teens, she knows what actually works and can relate to the reality of being a parent in the 21st century. Dr. Uhls also describes the primary research she conducted at UCLA, including whether extensive screen time impacts non-verbal emotional understanding, which has been covered in the New York Times, Time magazine, and on National Public Radio. There are few more important issues for parents today than helping children safely navigate the digital world in which we live, a world that provides immense opportunity for learning and connecting yet also puts kids in a position to make mistakes and even cause harm. Knowing what the facts are and when and how to get involved is perhaps one of the most challenging aspects of modern parenting. Media Moms & Digital Dads offers parents reassuring and fact-based guidance on how best to manage screens and media for their children.

Screenwise

Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World

Author: Devorah Heitner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351817833

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 4064

Screenwise offers a realistic and optimistic perspective on how to thoughtfully guide kids in the digital age. Many parents feel that their kids are addicted, detached, or distracted because of their digital devices. Media expert Devorah Heitner, however, believes that technology offers huge potential to our children-if parents help them. Using the foundation of their own values and experiences, parents and educators can learn about the digital world to help set kids up for a lifetime of success in a world fueled by technology. Screenwise is a guide to understanding more about what it is like for children to grow up with technology, and to recognizing the special challenges-and advantages-that contemporary kids and teens experience thanks to this level of connection. In it, Heitner presents practical parenting "hacks": quick ideas that you can implement today that will help you understand and relate to your digital native. The book will empower parents to recognize that the wisdom that they have gained throughout their lives is a relevant and urgently needed supplement to their kid's digital savvy, and help them develop skills for managing the new challenges of parenting. Based on real-life stories from other parents and Heitner's wealth of knowledge on the subject, Screenwise teaches parents what they need to know in order to raise responsible digital citizens.

Calmer Easier Happier Screen Time

For parents of toddlers to teens: A guide to getting back in charge of technology

Author: Noël Janis-Norton

Publisher: Yellow Kite

ISBN: 1473622778

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 400

View: 3737

Do you constantly find yourself battling to stop your kids spending hours in front of a screen? Whether it's a tv, an ipad, a pc or a playstation children are spending more and more time absorbed in the digital world and for most parents it's a cause for concern. The most frequent question parenting expert Noel Janis Norton is asked by desperate parents is how to limit and manage screen time. Parents know their children became aggressive and stressed after prolonged time on an electronic device, and they know that it limits their child's willingness to do other activities, yet they are at a loss of what to do about it. In Calmer Easier Happier Screen Time, Noel adapts her proven parenting strategies to this most complex of areas. Using the latest scientific research to show just how addictive the digital world can be for the developing brain of a child, she using the calmer, easier, happier techniques to help parents wean their children away from their electronic devices and get back in charge.

Reset Your Child's Brain

A Four-Week Plan to End Meltdowns, Raise Grades, and Boost Social Skills by Reversing the Effects of Electronic Screen-Time

Author: Victoria L. Dunckley, MD

Publisher: New World Library

ISBN: 1608682854

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 384

View: 3621

Increasing numbers of parents grapple with children who are acting out without obvious reason. Revved up and irritable, many of these children are diagnosed with ADHD, bipolar illness, autism, or other disorders but don’t respond well to treatment. They are then medicated, often with poor results and unwanted side effects. Based on emerging scientific research and extensive clinical experience, integrative child psychiatrist Dr. Victoria Dunckley has pioneered a four-week program to treat the frequent underlying cause, Electronic Screen Syndrome (ESS). Dr. Dunckley has found that everyday use of interactive screen devices — such as computers, video games, smartphones, and tablets — can easily overstimulate a child’s nervous system, triggering a variety of stubborn symptoms. In contrast, she’s discovered that a strict, extended electronic fast single-handedly improves mood, focus, sleep, and behavior, regardless of the child’s diagnosis. It also reduces the need for medication and renders other treatments more effective. Offered now in this book, this simple intervention can produce a life-changing shift in brain function and help your child get back on track — all without cost or medication. While no one in today’s connected world can completely shun electronic stimuli, Dr. Dunckley provides hope for parents who feel that their child has been misdiagnosed or inappropriately medicated, by presenting an alternative explanation for their child’s difficulties and a concrete plan for treating them.

The Rise of Women

The Growing Gender Gap in Education and What it Means for American Schools

Author: Thomas A. DiPrete,Claudia Buchmann

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610448006

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 4647

While powerful gender inequalities remain in American society, women have made substantial gains and now largely surpass men in one crucial arena: education. Women now outperform men academically at all levels of school, and are more likely to obtain college degrees and enroll in graduate school. What accounts for this enormous reversal in the gender education gap? In The Rise of Women: The Growing Gender Gap in Education and What It Means for American Schools, Thomas DiPrete and Claudia Buchmann provide a detailed and accessible account of women’s educational advantage and suggest new strategies to improve schooling outcomes for both boys and girls. The Rise of Women opens with a masterful overview of the broader societal changes that accompanied the change in gender trends in higher education. The rise of egalitarian gender norms and a growing demand for college-educated workers allowed more women to enroll in colleges and universities nationwide. As this shift occurred, women quickly reversed the historical male advantage in education. By 2010, young women in their mid-twenties surpassed their male counterparts in earning college degrees by more than eight percentage points. The authors, however, reveal an important exception: While women have achieved parity in fields such as medicine and the law, they lag far behind men in engineering and physical science degrees. To explain these trends, The Rise of Women charts the performance of boys and girls over the course of their schooling. At each stage in the education process, they consider the gender-specific impact of factors such as families, schools, peers, race and class. Important differences emerge as early as kindergarten, where girls show higher levels of essential learning skills such as persistence and self-control. Girls also derive more intrinsic gratification from performing well on a day-to-day basis, a crucial advantage in the learning process. By contrast, boys must often navigate a conflict between their emerging masculine identity and a strong attachment to school. Families and peers play a crucial role at this juncture. The authors show the gender gap in educational attainment between children in the same families tends to be lower when the father is present and more highly educated. A strong academic climate, both among friends and at home, also tends to erode stereotypes that disconnect academic prowess and a healthy, masculine identity. Similarly, high schools with strong science curricula reduce the power of gender stereotypes concerning science and technology and encourage girls to major in scientific fields. As the value of a highly skilled workforce continues to grow, The Rise of Women argues that understanding the source and extent of the gender gap in higher education is essential to improving our schools and the economy. With its rigorous data and clear recommendations, this volume illuminates new ground for future education policies and research.

Wired Child

Debunking Popular Technology Myths

Author: Richard Freed

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781503211698

Category: Computers and families

Page: 266

View: 6669

Science is confirming what your heart tells you: In this digital age, our kids need a healthy, family-centered childhood more than ever. As technology ushers in dramatic changes to our lives, the most important contributor to children's well-being is still their connection to family and school. But this connection is threatened by the addictive allure of today's flashy devices. Wired Child cuts through destructive tech myths and gives you practical strategies to build a strong family and foster kids' school success. You'll also learn how to protect children and teens from video game/Internet addiction and help them understand that technology is primarily a tool rather than a toy. This empowering book will give you the confidence to provide your child a loving and rewarding childhood in a digital age.

Parenting in the Age of Attention Snatchers

A Step-by-Step Guide to Balancing Child's Use of Technology

Author: Lucy Jo Palladino

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN: 0834800322

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 208

View: 1716

Are your kids glued to their screens? Here is a practical, step-by-step guide that gives parents the tools to teach children, from toddlers to teens, how to gain control of their technology use. As children spend more of their time on tablets and smartphones, using apps specially engineered to capture their attention, parents are becoming concerned about the effects of so much technology use—and they feel powerless to intervene. They want their kids to be competent and competitive in their use of technology, but they also want to prevent the attention and behavioral problems that can develop from overuse.In this guide, Lucy Jo Palladino doesn’t demonize technology; instead she gives parents the tools to help children understand and control their attention—and to recognize and resist when their attention is being "snatched." Palladino’s straightforward, evidence-based approach applies to kids of all ages. Parents will also learn the critical difference between voluntary and involuntary attention, new findings about brain development, and what puts children at risk for attention disorders.

Talking Back to Facebook

The Common Sense Guide to Raising Kids in the Digital Age

Author: James P. Steyer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451657358

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 224

View: 2790

A smart, urgently needed book that helps parents and their kids navigate today’s online landscape—from the founder and CEO of the nation’s leading authority on kids and the media. Now, more than ever, parents need help in navigating their kids’ online, media-saturated lives. Jim Steyer, founder and CEO of Common Sense Media, the nation’s leading kidsand- media organization, and the father of four children, knows that many parents and teachers—unlike their technology-savvy kids—may be tourists in the online world. In this essential book, Steyer—a frequent commentator on national TV and radio— offers an engaging blend of straightforward advice and anecdotes that address what he calls RAP, the major pitfalls relating to kids’ use of media and technology: relationship issues, attention/addiction problems, and the lack of privacy. Instead of shielding children completely from online images and messages, Steyer’s practical approach gives parents essential tools to help filter content, preserve good relationships with their children, and make common sense, value-driven judgments for kids of all ages. Not just about Facebook, this comprehensive, no-nonsense guide to the online world, media, and mobile devices belongs in the hands of all parents and educators raising kids in today’s digital age.

The Class

Living and Learning in the Digital Age

Author: Julian Sefton-Green,Sonia Livingstone

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479824240

Category: Computers

Page: 368

View: 4354

Do today’s youth have more opportunities than their parents? As they build their own social and digital networks, does that offer new routes to learning and friendship? How do they navigate the meaning of education in a digitally connected but fiercely competitive, highly individualized world? Based upon fieldwork at an ordinary London school, The Class examines young people's experiences of growing up and learning in a digital world. In this original and engaging study, Livingstone and Sefton-Green explore youth values, teenagers’ perspectives on their futures, and their tactics for facing the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. The authors follow the students as they move across their different social worlds—in school, at home, and with their friends, engaging in a range of activities from video games to drama clubs and music lessons. By portraying the texture of the students’ everyday lives, The Class seeks to understand how the structures of social class and cultural capital shape the development of personal interests, relationships and autonomy. Providing insights into how young people’s social, digital, and learning networks enable or disempower them, Livingstone and Sefton-Green reveal that the experience of disconnections and blocked pathways is often more common than that of connections and new opportunities.

The Happiness Effect

How Social Media Is Driving a Generation to Appear Perfect at Any Cost

Author: Donna Freitas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190239859

Category: Internet and youth

Page: 368

View: 4148

Sexting. Cyberbullying. Narcissism. Social media has become the dominant force in young people's lives, and each day seems to bring another shocking tale of private pictures getting into the wrong hands, or a lament that young people feel compelled to share their each and every thought with the entire world. Have smartphones and social media created a generation of self-obsessed egomaniacs? Absolutely not, Donna Freitas argues in this provocative book. And, she says, these alarmist fears are drawing attention away from the real issues that young adults are facing. Drawing on a large-scale survey and interviews with students on thirteen college campuses, Freitas finds that what young people are overwhelmingly concerned with--what they really want to talk about--is happiness. They face enormous pressure to look perfect online--not just happy, but blissful, ecstatic, and fabulously successful. Unable to achieve this impossible standard, they are anxious about letting the less-than-perfect parts of themselves become public. Far from wanting to share everything, they are brutally selective when it comes to curating their personal profiles, and worry obsessively that they might unwittingly post something that could come back to haunt them later in life. Through candid conversations with young people from diverse backgrounds, Freitas reveals how even the most well-adjusted individuals can be stricken by self-doubt when they compare their experiences with the vast collective utopia that they see online. And sometimes, as on anonymous platforms like Yik Yak, what they see instead is a depressing cesspool of racism and misogyny. Yet young people are also extremely attached to their smartphones and apps, which sometimes bring them great pleasure. It is very much a love-hate relationship. While much of the public's attention has been focused on headline-grabbing stories, the everyday struggles and joys of young people have remained under the radar. Freitas brings their feelings to the fore, in the words of young people themselves. The Happiness Effect is an eye-opening window into their first-hand experiences of social media and its impact on them.

Help--My Kid is Driving Me Crazy

The 17 Ways Kids Manipulate Their Parents, and What You Can Do About It

Author: David Swanson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101133686

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 240

View: 8504

A family psychologist offers parents clear and simple techniques for disarming the strategies kids use to manipulate them. Every parent knows that children quickly learn how to push their buttons. Now, this invaluable and insightful book, written by a prominent clinical psychologist, identifies the specific ways kids manipulate their parents?and how to stop each tactic. These uncannily sophisticated and undermining strategies include: ? Emotional blackmail ? Shutting down ? Negotiation ? Protest ? Playing the victim ? Dividing the parents Filled with informative and practical advice, this insightful guide is designed to help parents restore harmony, discipline, and healthy relationships?and put an end to selfish, manipulative behavior for good.