The Etymologicon

A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101611766

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 304

View: 4721

Do you know why… …a mortgage is literally a death pledge? …why guns have girls’ names? …why salt is related to soldier? You’re about to find out… The Etymologicon (e-t?-‘mä-lä-ji-kän) is: *Witty (wi-te\): Full of clever humor *Erudite (er-?-dit): Showing knowledge *Ribald (ri-b?ld): Crude, offensive The Etymologicon is a completely unauthorized guide to the strange underpinnings of the English language. It explains: how you get from “gruntled” to “disgruntled”; why you are absolutely right to believe that your meager salary barely covers “money for salt”; how the biggest chain of coffee shops in the world (hint: Seattle) connects to whaling in Nantucket; and what precisely the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.

The Etymologicon

A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0425260798

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 279

View: 3016

Unauthorized guide to the underpinnings of the English language.

The Etymologicon

A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

ISBN: 9781848313194

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 6356

The Sunday Times Number One Bestseller 'Not since Eats, Shoots & Leaves has a book about language attracted so much attention' Robert McCrum, Observer What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled? What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces? The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth's Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It's an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language, taking in monks and monkeys, film buffs and buffaloes, and explaining precisely what the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.

The Horologicon

A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0425264378

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 286

View: 5030

A follow-up to the best-selling The Etymologiocon provides whimsical, archaic words describing the familiar feelings and activities of various times of day, from being "philogrobolized" first thing in the morning and "fudgelling" one's way through the work day to emerging a sparking "deipnosopbist" at dinnertime. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

The Oxford Guide to Etymology

Author: Philip Durkin

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191618780

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 360

View: 8621

This practical introduction to word history investigates every aspect of where words come from and how they change. Philip Durkin, chief etymologist of the Oxford English Dictionary, shows how different types of evidence can shed light on the myriad ways in which words change in form and meaning. He considers how such changes can be part of wider linguistic processes, or be influenced by a complex mixture of social and cultural factors. He illustrates every point with a wide range of fascinating examples. Dr Durkin investigates folk etymology and other changes which words undergo in everyday use. He shows how language families are established, how words in different languages can have a common ancester, and the ways in which the latter can be distinguished from words introduced through language contact. He examines the etymologies of the names of people and places. His focus is on English but he draws many examples from languages such as French, German, and Latin which cast light on the pre-histories of English words. The Oxford Guide to Etymology is reliable, readable, instructive, and enjoyable. Everyone interested in the history of words will value this account of an endlessly fascinating subject.

The Unknown Unknown

Bookshops and the delight of not getting what you wanted

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

ISBN: 184831793X

Category: Social Science

Page: 32

View: 8934

Mark Forsyth – author of the Sunday Times Number One bestseller The Etymologicon – reveals in this essay, specially commissioned for Independent Booksellers Week, the most valuable thing about a really good bookshop. Along the way he considers the wisdom of Donald Rumsfeld, naughty French photographs, why Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy would never have met online, and why only a bookshop can give you that precious thing – what you never knew you were looking for.

The Origins of English Words

A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots

Author: Joseph Twadell Shipley

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801896436

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 672

View: 3404

Anecdotal, eclectic, and always enthusiastic, The Origins of English Words is a diverting expedition beyond linguistics into literature, history, folklore, anthropology, philosophy, and science.

The Elements of Eloquence

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781785781728

Category:

Page: 208

View: 1515

FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE SUNDAY TIMESNUMBER ONE BESTSELLERTHE ETYMOLOGICON Mark Forsyth presents the secret of writing unforgettable phrases, uncovering the techniques that have made immortal such lines as ‘To be or not to be’ and ‘Bond. James Bond.’ In his inimitably entertaining and witty style, he takes apart famous quotations and shows how you too can write like Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde or John Lennon. Crammed with tricks to make the most humdrum sentiments seem poetic or wise, The Elements of Eloquencereveals how writers through the ages have turned humble words into literary gold – and how you can do the same. ‘An informative but highly entertaining journey through the figures of rhetoric … Mark Forsyth wears his considerable knowledge lightly. He also writes beautifully.’ David Marsh, Guardian

Word Origins

Author: John Ayto

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408101602

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 576

View: 2159

The average contemporary English speaker knows 50,000 words. Yet stripped down to its origins, this apparently huge vocabulary is in reality much smaller, derived from Latin, French and the Germanic languages. It is estimated that every year, 800 neologisms are added to the English language: acronyms (nimby), blended words (motel), and those taken from foreign languages (savoir-faire). Laid out in an A-Z format with detailed cross references, and written in a style that is both authoritative and accessible, Word Origins is a valuable historical guide to the English language.

A Christmas Cornucopia

The Hidden Stories Behind Our Yuletide Traditions

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 024197755X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 9640

The unpredictable origins and etymologies of our cracking Christmas customs For something that happens every year of our lives, we really don't know much about Christmas. We don't know that the date we celebrate was chosen by a madman, or that Christmas, etymologically speaking, means "Go away, Christ". Nor do we know that Christmas was first celebrated in 243 AD on March 28th - and only moved to 25th December in 354 AD. We're oblivious to the fact that the advent calendar was actually invented by a Munich housewife to stop her children pestering her for a Christmas countdown. And we would never have guessed that the invention of crackers was merely a way of popularising sweet wrappers. Luckily, like a gift from Santa himself, Mark Forsyth is here to unwrap this fundamentally funny gallimaufry of traditions and oddities, making it all finally make sense - in his wonderfully entertaining wordy way.

The Unexpected Evolution of Language

Discover the Surprising Etymology of Everyday Words

Author: Justin Cord Hayes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1440542791

Category: Reference

Page: 240

View: 9276

This book is awesome awful! Did you know that "awful" first originated as a compliment? How about the fact that it was perfectly fine for someone to defecate in their living room? Or that at one time a bully was actually a sweetheart? You may think that these things sound outlandish, but hundreds of years ago, the words "awful," "defecate," and "bully" meant something entirely different than what we know today. The Unexpected Evolution of Language reveals the origins of 208 everyday terms and the interesting stories behind their shift in meaning. Arranged in alphabetical order, you will enjoy uncovering the backstories to terms like: Awful - worthy of respect or fear; inspiring awe Bimbo - slang for a stupid, inconsequential man Defecate - to purify; cleanse Invest - to clothe; to dress Nice - foolish; stupid Relay - hunting term meaning fresh pack of hounds From "aftermath" and "sophisticated" to "empty" and "prestige," you will aboslutely love seeing just what kind of damage time has done to the English language.

The Greek & Latin Roots of English

Author: Tamara M. Green

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442233281

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 304

View: 3105

The Greek & Latin Roots of English approaches the study of Latin and Greek thematically: vocabulary is organized into various topics, from politics to philosophy, with chapters featuring cumulative exercises and notes to help students learn the pleasures (and pitfalls) of language study. The fifth edition features revised exercises, alphabetical vocabulary lists, and more.

Word Origins And How We Know Them

Etymology for Everyone

Author: Anatoly Liberman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199889015

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 9023

"Millions of people want to know the origin of the words they use. Word columns in daily newspapers and numerous books attempt to satisfy their curiosity. Word histories are usually digested like pills: the user is interested in getting well, not in the chemistry of the prescribed medication. Those who send letters to the Editor also want a straight answer without bothering about how "editors" come by their knowledge. Therefore, they fail to realize that etymologies are seldom definitive and that the science of etymology is intensely interesting. Perhaps if someone explained to them that, compared to the drama of words, Hamlet is a light farce, they might develop a more informed attitude toward philological research and become students of historical linguistics rather than gullible consumers of journalists' pap."--Anatoly Liberman Word Origins is the only guide to the science and process of etymology for the layperson. This funny, charming, and conversational book not only tells the known origins of hundreds of words, but also shows how their origins were determined. Liberman, an internationally acclaimed etymologist, takes the reader by the hand and explains the many ways that English words can be made, and the many ways in which etymologists try to unearth the origins of words. Part history, part how-to, and completely entertaining, Word Origins invites readers behind the scenes to watch an etymologist at work.

A Short History of Drunkenness

How, Why, Where, and When Humankind Has Gotten Merry from the Stone Age to the Present

Author: Mark Forsyth

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN: 0525575383

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9157

From the internationally bestselling author of The Etymologicon, a lively and fascinating exploration of humankind's favorite pastime Almost every culture on earth has drink, and where there's drink there's drunkenness. But in every age and in every place drunkenness is a little bit different. It can be religious, it can be sexual, it can be the duty of kings or the relief of peasants. It can be an offering to the ancestors, or a way of marking the end of a day's work. It can send you to sleep, or send you into battle. A Short History of Drunkenness traces humankind's love affair with booze from our primate ancestors through to Prohibition, answering every possible question along the way: What did people drink? How much? Who did the drinking? Of the many possible reasons, why? On the way, learn about the Neolithic Shamans, who drank to communicate with the spirit world (no pun intended), marvel at how Greeks got giddy and Sumerians got sauced, and find out how bars in the Wild West were never quite like in the movies. This is a history of the world at its inebriated best.

The Secret Life of Words

How English Became English

Author: Henry Hitchings

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429941570

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 448

View: 7698

Words are essential to our everyday lives. An average person spends his or her day enveloped in conversations, e-mails, phone calls, text messages, directions, headlines, and more. But how often do we stop to think about the origins of the words we use? Have you ever thought about which words in English have been borrowed from Arabic, Dutch, or Portuguese? Try admiral, landscape, and marmalade, just for starters. The Secret Life of Words is a wide-ranging account not only of the history of English language and vocabulary, but also of how words witness history, reflect social change, and remind us of our past. Henry Hitchings delves into the insatiable, ever-changing English language and reveals how and why it has absorbed words from more than 350 other languages—many originating from the most unlikely of places, such as shampoo from Hindi and kiosk from Turkish. From the Norman Conquest to the present day, Hitchings narrates the story of English as a living archive of our human experience. He uncovers the secrets behind everyday words and explores the surprising origins of our most commonplace expressions. The Secret Life of Words is a rich, lively celebration of the language and vocabulary that we too often take for granted.

Inflight Science

A Guide to the World from Your Airplane Window

Author: Brian Clegg

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

ISBN: 1848312806

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 6438

The perfect companion to any flight - a guide to the science on view from your window seat. There are few times when science is so immediate as when you're in a plane. Your life is in the hands of the scientists and engineers who enable tons of metal and plastic to hurtle through the sky at hundreds of miles an hour. Inflight Science shows how you stay alive up there - but that's only the beginning. Brian Clegg explains the ever changing view, whether it's crop circles or clouds, mountains or river deltas, and describes simple experiments to show how a wing provides lift, or what happens if you try to open a door in midair (don't!). On a plane you'll experience the impact of relativity, the power of natural radiation and the effect of altitude on the boiling point of tea. Among the many things you'll learn is why the sky is blue, the cause of thunderstorms and the impact of volcanic ash in an enjoyable tour of mid-air science. Every moment of your journey is an opportunity to experience science in action: Inflight Science will be your guide.

The Painted Word

A Treasure Chest of Remarkable Words and Their Origins

Author: Phil Cousineau

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1936740257

Category: Reference

Page: 336

View: 2287

To untangle the knot of interlocking meanings of these painted words, logophile and mythologist Phil Cousineau begins each fascinating word entry with his own brief definition. He then fills it in with a tint of etymology and a smattering of quotes that show how the word is used, ending with a list of companion words. The words themselves range from commonplace — like biscuit, a twice-baked cake for Roman soldiers — to loanwords including chaparral, from the Basque shepherds who came to the American West; words from myths, such as hector; metamorphosis words, like silly, which evolved holy to goofy in a mere thousand years; and words well worthy of revival, such as carrytale, a wandering storyteller. Whether old-fangled or brand new, all the words included in The Painted Word possess an ineffable quality that makes them luminous.

Dent's Modern Tribes

The Secret Languages of Britain

Author: Susie Dent

Publisher: John Murray

ISBN: 147362388X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 5864

Did you know that . . . a soldier's biggest social blunder is called jack brew - making yourself a cuppa without making one for anyone else? That twitchers have an expression for a bird that can't be identified - LBJ (the letters stand for Little Brown Job)? Or that builders call plastering the ceiling doing Lionel Richie's dancefloor? Susie Dent does. Ever wondered why football managers all speak the same way, what a cabbie calls the Houses of Parliament, or how ticket inspectors discreetly request back-up? We are surrounded by hundreds of tribes, each speaking their own distinct slanguage of colourful words, jokes and phrases, honed through years of conversations on the battlefield, in A&E, backstage, or at ten-thousand feet in the air. Susie Dent has spent years interviewing hundreds of professionals, hobbyists and enthusiasts, and the result is an idiosyncratic phrasebook like no other. From the Freemason's handshake to the publican's banter, Dent's Modern Tribes takes us on a whirlwind tour of Britain, decoding its secret languages and, in the process, finds out what really makes us all tick.

The Story of English in 100 Words

Author: David Crystal

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466805080

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 5916

The world's foremost expert on the English language takes us on an entertaining and eye-opening tour of the history of our vernacular through the ages. In The Story of English in 100 Words, an entertaining history of the world's most ubiquitous language, David Crystal draws on one hundred words that best illustrate the huge variety of sources, influences and events that have helped to shape our vernacular since the first definitively English word—‘roe'—was written down on the femur of a roe deer in the fifth century. Featuring ancient words (‘loaf'), cutting edge terms that relfect our world (‘twittersphere'), indispensible words that shape our tongue (‘and', ‘what'), fanciful words (‘fopdoodle') and even obscene expressions (the "c word"...), David Crystal takes readers on a tour of the winding byways of our language via the rude, the obscure and the downright surprising.