The Global Justice Reader

Author: Thom Brooks

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 741

View: 8798

'The Global Justice Reader' brings together key foundational and contemporary writings on this important topic in moral and political philosophy.

The Morality and Global Justice Reader

Author: Michael Boylan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0813345146

Category: Philosophy

Page: 440

View: 5119

This cutting-edge volume of original essays features a diverse, international team of prominent scholars examining issues of morality and justice within a global perspective. The chapters are grouped according to an integrative design that progresses from normative principles to normative theories to normative applications. Applications chapters address current significant and provocative topics such as poverty and the global economy; global health; religion; war; and gender, identity, and family. Distinguished philosopher and volume editor Michael Boylan provides a unifying introduction to each section. In addition, an abstract and list of key words provide readers with an informative entry into each reading. An engaging resource for all students of philosophy and politics, The Morality and Global Justice Reader not only offers an essential foundation of global justice and its policy implications, but also aims to inspire readers to positive action for change. A single-authored volume by Michael Boylan, Morality and Global Justice: Justifications and Applications, is also available as a complementary or a standalone text.

Encyclopedia of Global Justice

Author: Deen K. Chatterjee

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402091605

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1200

View: 9511

This two-volume Encyclopedia of Global Justice, published by Springer, along with Springer's book series, Studies in Global Justice, is a major publication venture toward a comprehensive coverage of this timely topic. The Encyclopedia is an international, interdisciplinary, and collaborative project, spanning all the relevant areas of scholarship related to issues of global justice, and edited and advised by leading scholars from around the world. The wide-ranging entries present the latest ideas on this complex subject by authors who are at the cutting edge of inquiry. The Encyclopedia sets the tone and direction of this increasingly important area of scholarship for years to come. The entries number around 500 and consist of essays of 300 to 5000 words. The inclusion and length of entries are based on their significance to the topic of global justice, regardless of their importance in other areas.

Political Theory of Global Justice

A Cosmopolitan Case for the World State

Author: Luis Cabrera

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415770668

Category: Political Science

Page: 215

View: 2479

Could global government be the answer to global poverty and starvation? Cosmopolitan thinkers challenge the widely held belief that we owe more to our co-citizens than to those in other countries. This book offers a moral argument for world government, claiming that not only do we have strong obligations to people elsewhere, but that accountable integration among nation-states will help ensure that all persons can lead a decent life. Cabrera considers both the views of those political philosophers who say we have much stronger obligations to help our co-citizens than foreigners and those cosmopolitans who say our duties are equally strong to each but resist restructuring.

Hegel and Global Justice

Author: Andrew Buchwalter

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9048189969

Category: Philosophy

Page: 241

View: 2915

Hegel and Global Justice details the relevance of the thought of G.W.F. Hegel for the burgeoning academic discussions of the topic of global justice. Against the conventional view that Hegel has little constructive to offer to these discussions, this collection, drawing on the expertise of distinguished Hegel scholars and internationally recognized political and social theorists, explicates the contribution both of Hegel himself and his "dialectical" method to the analysis and understanding of a wide range of topics associated with the concept of global justice, construed very broadly. These topics include universal human rights, cosmopolitanism, and cosmopolitan justice, transnationalism, international law, global interculturality, a global poverty, cosmopolitan citizenship, global governance, a global public sphere, a global ethos, and a global notion of collective self-identity. Attention is also accorded the value of Hegel’s account of mutual recognition for analysing themes in global justice, both as regards the politics of recognition at the global level and the conditions for a general account of relations of people and persons under conditions of globalization. In exploring these and related themes, the authors of this book regularly compare Hegel to others who have contributed to the discourse on global justice, including Kant, Marx, Rawls, Habermas, Singer, Pogge, Nussbaum, Appiah, and David Miller.

Current Debates in Global Justice

Author: Gillian Brock,Darrel Moellendorf

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402034947

Category: Philosophy

Page: 305

View: 2446

The papers collected in this volume represent some of the finest recent work by political philosophers and political theorists in the area of global justice. Covering both theoretical and applied issues, these papers are distinguished by their exceptional quality. Moreover, they give the reader a sense both of the scope of the field as it is currently emerging and the direction that the debates seem to be taking. This anthology is essential reading for anyone serious about understanding the current pressing issues in Global Justice Studies. With contributions from: Richard Arneson, Charles Beitz, Luis Cabrera, Omar Dahbour, Robert Goodin, Dale Jamieson, John Lango, David Miller, Thomas Pogge, Sanjay Reddy, Mathias Risse, Gopal Sreenivasan, and James Sterba.

The Work of Global Justice

Human Rights as Practices

Author: Fuyuki Kurasawa

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139467735

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 7169

Human rights have been generally understood as juridical products, organizational outcomes or abstract principles that are realized through formal means such as passing laws, creating institutions or formulating ideals. In this book, Fuyuki Kurasawa argues that we must reverse this 'top-down' focus by examining how groups and persons struggling against global injustices construct and enact human rights through five transnational forms of ethico-political practice: bearing witness, forgiveness, foresight, aid and solidarity. From these, he develops a new perspective highlighting the difficult social labour that constitutes the substance of what global justice is and ought to be, thereby reframing the terms of debates about human rights and providing the outlines of a critical cosmopolitanism centred around emancipatory struggles for an alternative globalization.

Edges of Global Justice

The World Social Forum and Its "others"

Author: Janet M. Conway

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415506212

Category: Political Science

Page: 203

View: 2071

This book analyzes the World Social Forum (WSF) in a context of crisis and transition in the history of Western capitalist modernity. Based on ten years of fieldwork on three continents, this book treats social movements as knowledge producers. It pays attention to what movements are doing and saying on the terrain of the WSF over time and from place to place, and to how they theorize its significance. Framed by the Latin American modernity-coloniality perspective, the book critically engages with discourses of global civil society, autonomism, and transnational feminism toward a reading of the WSF through the lens of 'colonial difference'. Each chapter outlines a set of contestations and contributions with relevance beyond debates about the WSF. It will be of strong interest to students and scholars of social movement studies; international politics; post-colonial studies; gender studies; sociology; political theory and social work.

Global Justice

Author: Christian Barry,Holly Lawford-Smith

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780754629795

Category: Law

Page: 515

View: 2534

Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. This volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions as well as articles that bring the theoretical insights of global justice thinkers to bear on matters of practical concern to contemporary societies, such as policies associated with immigration, international trade and climate change.

Morality and Global Justice

Justifications and Applications

Author: Michael Boylan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0813345138

Category: Philosophy

Page: 248

View: 7922

In this concise, single-authored text, renowned scholar and professor Michael Boylan examines the moral justifications underlying key global justice issues and provides students with the analytical tools to approach those issues critically. Introductory chapters establish a thorough but accessible foundation in theory and moral justification, and subsequent chapters apply those concepts to key areas of global concern: poverty; public health; race, gender, and sexual orientation; democracy and social/political dialog; globalization; the environment; war and terrorism; and immigrants and refugees. For easy reference and review, each chapter includes key terms, critical applied reasoning exercises (CARE), and problems and thought experiments perfect for class discussions or writing exercises. The appendix, “Getting Involved,” guides students in putting ethical principles to work. An anthology of original essays, The Morality and Global Justice Reader, is also available as a complementary or a standalone text.

Global Justice

A Cosmopolitan Account

Author: Gillian Brock

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191552313

Category: Philosophy

Page: 384

View: 7352

Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The model addresses concerns about implementation in the world, showing how we can move from theory to public policy that makes progress toward global justice. It also makes clear how legitimate forms of nationalism are compatible with commitments to global justice. Global Justice is divided into three central parts. In the first, Brock defends a cosmopolitan model of global justice. In the second, which is largely concerned with public policy issues, she argues that there is much we can and should do toward achieving global justice. She addresses several pressing problems, discussing both theoretical and public policy issues involved with each. These include tackling global poverty, taxation reform, protection of basic liberties, humanitarian intervention, immigration, and problems associated with global economic arrangements. In the third part, she shows how the discussion of public policy issues can usefully inform our theorizing; in particular, it assists our thinking about the place of nationalism and equality in an account of global justice.

Just Responsibility

A Human Rights Theory of Global Justice

Author: Brooke A. Ackerly

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019066293X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 312

View: 2937

It has been well-established that many of the injustices that people around the world experience every day, from food insecurity to unsafe labor conditions and natural disasters, are the result of wide-scale structural problems of politics and economics. These are not merely random personal problems or consequences of bad luck or bad planning. Confronted by this fact, it is natural to ask what should or can we do to mitigate everyday injustices? In one sense, we answer this question when we buy the local homeless street newspaper, decide where to buy our clothes, remember our reusable bags when we shop, donate to disaster relief, or send letters to corporations about labor rights. But given the global scale of injustices related to poverty, environmental change, gender, and labor, can these individual acts really impact the seemingly intractable global social, political, and economic structures that perpetuate and exacerbate them? Moreover, can we respond to injustices in the world in ways that do more than just address their consequences? In this book, Brooke A. Ackerly both answers the question of what should we do, and shows that it's the wrong question to ask. To ask the right question, we need to ground our normative theory of global justice in the lived experience of injustice. Using a feminist critical methodology, she argues that what to do about injustice is not just an ethical or moral question, but a political question about assuming responsibility for injustice, regardless of our causal responsibility and extent of our knowledge of the injustice. Furthermore, it is a matter that needs to be guided by principles of human rights. As she argues, while many understand human rights as political goals or entitlements, they can also guide political strategy. Her aims are twofold: to present a theory of what it means to take responsibility for injustice and for ensuring human rights, as well as to develop a guide for how to take responsibility in ways that support local and global movements for transformative politics. In order to illustrate her theory and guide for action, Ackerly draws on fieldwork on the Rana Plaza collapse in 2013, the food crisis of 2008, and strategies from 125 activist organizations working on women's and labor rights across 26 countries. Just Responsibility integrates these ways of taking political responsibility into a rich theory of political community, accountability, and leadership in which taking responsibility for injustice itself transforms the fabric of political life.

Borders of Global Theory - Reflections from Within and Without

ProtoSociology

Author: Barrie Axford

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3744838927

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 9975

Global Theory from Within and Without is a critical examination of the concept of globalization. There are in sociological theory many definitions of globalization. Sociological theory constructs a new theory of globalization starting from the structural changes of social systems at the beginning of the 21th century. The research subject is the ongoing connection of global studies and the research program of multiple modernities. The structural change is initiated by growing pace and different intensities of social exchange of the subsystems of societal communication in contemporary societies. The studies of global scholarship show that the structural change is not an indicator of any unified constitution of social systems.

Microfinance, Rights and Global Justice

Author: Tom Sorell,Luis Cabrera

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107110971

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 212

View: 4247

Contributors examine the ethical issues surrounding microfinance, including questions about exploitation, human rights, and efforts to promote global justice.

On Global Justice

Author: Mathias Risse

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400845505

Category: Philosophy

Page: 480

View: 9014

Debates about global justice have traditionally fallen into two camps. Statists believe that principles of justice can only be held among those who share a state. Those who fall outside this realm are merely owed charity. Cosmopolitans, on the other hand, believe that justice applies equally among all human beings. On Global Justice shifts the terms of this debate and shows how both views are unsatisfactory. Stressing humanity's collective ownership of the earth, Mathias Risse offers a new theory of global distributive justice--what he calls pluralist internationalism--where in different contexts, different principles of justice apply. Arguing that statists and cosmopolitans seek overarching answers to problems that vary too widely for one single justice relationship, Risse explores who should have how much of what we all need and care about, ranging from income and rights to spaces and resources of the earth. He acknowledges that especially demanding redistributive principles apply among those who share a country, but those who share a country also have obligations of justice to those who do not because of a universal humanity, common political and economic orders, and a linked global trading system. Risse's inquiries about ownership of the earth give insights into immigration, obligations to future generations, and obligations arising from climate change. He considers issues such as fairness in trade, responsibilities of the WTO, intellectual property rights, labor rights, whether there ought to be states at all, and global inequality, and he develops a new foundational theory of human rights.

Global Justice and International Labour Rights

Author: Yossi Dahan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107087872

Category: Law

Page: 314

View: 2828

Presents innovative perspectives on the moral and legal obligations of individuals and institutions toward workers in the global era.

Global Justice and International Affairs

Author: Thom Brooks

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004203435

Category: Philosophy

Page: 318

View: 2295

Global justice and international affairs is perhaps the hottest topic in political philosophy today. This book brings together some of the most important essays in this area. Topics include sovereignty and self-determination, cosmopolitanism and nationalism, global poverty and international distributive justice, and war and terrorism.

Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement

Author: Catherine Eschle,Bice Maiguashca

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0742567818

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 628

Challenging the neglect of feminism in accounts of the global justice movement, this book explores the origins, ideas, and practices of what Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca term "feminist antiglobalization activism." Drawing on fieldwork undertaken at the World Social Forum, the authors argue that feminists constitute a distinct, if diverse, sector of the global justice movement. Taking feminism seriously, the authors conclude, points us toward a richer and more theoretically nuanced understanding of the global justice movement and its struggle to create other possible worlds. Their book thus offers vital insights not only for feminists but also for all those interested in contemporary social movements and in global governance and resistance.

Globalisation, Global Justice and Social Work

Author: Iain Ferguson,Michael Lavalette,Elizabeth Whitmore

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415325382

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 9655

This book tackles the effects of the past decade's neoliberalism and globalisation on world-wide social work. The book also grapples with the implications for social work practice of the global social justice/anti-corporate and more.

Weltarmut und Menschenrechte

Kosmopolitische Verantwortung und Reformen

Author: De Gruyter

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110227355

Category: Philosophy

Page: 389

View: 7745

Thomas Pogge’s book explains why so many of the wealthy believe that they have no responsibility for the elimination of poverty even though a degree of income transfer seems morally required. The theories of the wealthy are seemingly disconnected from poverty in other countries. Pogge dispatches with this illusion and suggests a realistic standard of global economic justice.