The International Court of Justice

Questions and Answers about the Principal Judicial Organ of the United Nations

Author: International Court of Justice

Publisher: United Nations Publications

ISBN: 9789211008227

Category: Law

Page: 77

View: 1884

The International Court of Justice plays an important role in the settlement of legal disputes between states and contributes to the development of international law. This booklet answers some frequently asked questions about its functions and its case-law. It explains how members are elected to the Court, the sources of the law applied, who may submit cases and who might request advisory opinions.

The International Court of Justice

Its Role in the Maintenance of International Peace and Security

Author: Oliver James Lissitzyn

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584777028

Category: Law

Page: 118

View: 881

A successor to the League of Nation's Permanent Court of International Justice, the International Court of Justice was established in 1946 by the United Nations. Written during its early years, this incisive study outlines how the court functioned as an "instrument for the maintenance of international peace and security" and how it may function in the future. Though skeptical that the court would be a powerful institution, Lissitzyn believed its rulings would have a modest but notable effect on the development of international law. Long out of print, this essay was originally published in the Carnegie series United Nations Studies.

Evidence Before the International Court of Justice

Author: Anna Riddell,Brendan Plant

Publisher: British Institute for International & Comparative Law

ISBN: 9781905221639

Category: Law

Page: 448

View: 4557

Some recent contentious issues about the use of evidence in cases before the International Court of Justice have highlighted the importance of fact-finding and the use of evidence before this Court. This major study on the issue of evidence before the International Court of Justice has examined all aspects of the Court's relationship with facts in both contentious and advisory proceedings from the recently refined procedure for submitting late evidence, to the hearing of live witness testimony in the Peace Palace. Considerations of flexibility and respect for the sovereignty of the State Parties before the Court have traditionally deterred the Court from constructing concrete rules on matters of evidence, but the increasing numbers of cases, in which a thorough consideration of the facts has been essential, has highlighted that some detailed procedural guidance is necessary in order to ensure a well-functioning system of adjudication. It is apparent that the Court has paid an incre

Fifty Years of the International Court of Justice

Essays in Honour of Sir Robert Jennings

Author: Vaughan Lowe,Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521048804

Category: Law

Page: 640

View: 3383

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of the International Court of Justice, a distinguished group of international judges, practitioners and academics has undertaken a major review of its work. The chapters discuss the main areas of substantive law with which the Court has been concerned, and the more significant aspects of its practice and procedure in dealing with cases before it. It discusses the role of the Court in the international legal order, and its relationship with the UN's political organs. The thirty-three chapters are presented under five headings: the Court; the sources and evidences of international law; substance of international law; procedural aspects of the Court's work; the Court and the UN. It has been prepared in honour of Sir Robert Jennings, judge and sometime President of the Court.

The International Court of Justice and the Effectiveness of International Law

Author: Philippe Couvreur

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 9004328866

Category: Law

Page: 278

View: 325

The International Court of Justice and the Effectiveness of International Law, by Philippe Couvreur, Registrar of the ICJ, offers an account of the history and main achievements of the principal judicial organ of the United Nations, the only court with universal and general jurisdiction.

Jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice

Author: Hanqin Xue

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004342761

Category: Law

Page: 262

View: 3015

Jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice by Judge Xue Hanqin introduces general concepts that underlie international adjudication and the basic rules and principles governing the competence and jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice.

The International Court of Justice

Its Future Role After Fifty Years

Author: A. Sam Muller,Sam Muller,David Raič,J. M. Thuránszky

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 9789041103253

Category: Law

Page: 433

View: 9510

This is the third volume in the series by the "Leiden Journal of" "International Law" dealing with the Decade of International Law and International Dispute Settlement. In this book, the 50th anniversary of the International Court of Justice is commemorated. Its past and future role is examined from various angles which have been defined as "roles "played by the Court. First and foremost, its role as a mechanism for the settlement of disputes is examined. The analysis goes beyond the traditional frontiers of disputes between states and also explores the possibilities of granting international organizations and individuals access to the Court. The second role that is looked into is its supervisory role, or, in other words, its possible role as supreme court in international law. Thirdly, the Court in its advisory function is examined. The last role that is focused upon is the Court in its role as developer of rules of international law. The book ends with a conclusion from both a legal and a political perspective.

The Role and Record of the International Court of Justice

Author: Nagendra Singh

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 9780792302919

Category: Political Science

Page: 443

View: 7710

Since its birth with the creation of the international Red Cross in 1863, international humanitarian assistance has developed considerably since World War II. In accordance with the Red Cross principle of humanity, it aims at preventing & alleviating human suffering wherever it may be found, protecting life & health & ensuring respect for the human being. International humanitarian assistance involves a complex network of government agencies, intergovernmental & non-governmental organizations, & individual volunteers: it has been labelled a 'non-system'. While governments & intergovernmental organizations play a dominant & structured role in this field, the non-governmental organizations & their volunteers have proved to be their necessary operational partners, providing material, medical & moral relief & care wherever it may be needed, beyond borders, at the grassroots level. Following a brief review of recent humanitarian activities of intergovernmental organizations, & an analysis of current trends of voluntarism, this book focuses on the role, status & attitudes of the major humanitarian non-governmental organizations, including the Red Cross organizations, the British charities, Church-related agencies, medical volunteers (such as the 'French Doctors') & U.N. volunteers. Should humanitarian non-governmental organizations provide relief assistance with the Red Cross concern for discretion, neutrality & impartiality? Or should they bear witness & denounce publicly human rights violations, at the risk of being expelled from recipient countries & having to stop their assistance? The controversial claim of a 'right' to receive & a 'duty' to provide humanitarian assistance beyond borders is also addressed, as well as the possible need for a status to be accorded to international volunteers.

The International Court of Justice

Author: Robert Kolb

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 178225188X

Category: Law

Page: 1362

View: 1507

The International Court of Justice (in French, the Cour internationale de justice), also commonly known as the World Court or ICJ, is the oldest, most important and most famous judicial arm of the United Nations. Established by the United Nations Charter in 1945 and based in the Peace Palace in the Hague, the primary function of the Court is to adjudicate in disputes brought before it by states, and to provide authoritative, influential advisory opinions on matters referred to it by various international organisations, agencies and the UN General Assembly. This new work, by a leading academic authority on international law who also appears as an advocate before the Court, examines the Statute of the Court, its procedures, conventions and practices, in a way that will provide invaluable assistance to all international lawyers. The book covers matters such as: the composition of the Court and elections, the office and role of ad hoc judges, the significance of the occasional use of smaller Chambers, jurisdiction, the law applied, preliminary objections, the range of contentious disputes which may be submitted to the Court, the status of advisory opinions, relationship to the Security Council, applications to intervene, the status of judgments and remedies. Referring to a wealth of primary and secondary sources, this work provides international lawyers with a readable, comprehensive and authoritative work of reference which will greatly enhance understanding and knowledge of the ICJ. The book has been translated and lightly updated from the French original, R Kolb, La Cour international de Justice (Paris, Pedone, 2013), by Alan Perry, Solicitor of the Senior Courts of England and Wales. Winner of the 2014 American Society of International Law Certificate of Merit for High Technical Craftsmanship and Utility to Practicing Lawyers and Scholars: 'Robert Kolb's International Court of Justice provides a magisterial, lucid study of its subject. The breadth and depth of the treatment are impressive: Kolb takes the reader from the history of the Court, to its role in international society, to the more technical questions concerning its composition, powers and procedures, to the development of its jurisprudence, and to its future. The finely grained discussion provides much more than a mere survey of the Court's constitutive instruments and decisions. It engages the Court as an institution and asks how it actually operates, and secures efficacy and authority in doing so. The book's careful and detailed coverage of the Court's legal framework and operation will benefit practitioners and scholars alike. There is no doubt that Kolb's volume immediately takes a place among the authoritative references on the Court.' ASIL Book Awards Committee

Bibliography of the International Court of Justice

Author: United Nations Staff

Publisher: United Nations Publications

ISBN: 9789210709651

Category:

Page: 124

View: 5967

This publication contains bibliographical references concerning the International Court of Justice received by the Registry of the Court during 1997.

The International Court of Justice

Author: Hugh Thirlway

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198779070

Category:

Page: 240

View: 8529

An easily accessible and comprehensive study of the International Court of Justice, this book succinctly explains all aspects of the world's most important court, including an overview of its composition and operation, jurisdiction, procedure, and the nature and impact of its judgments.

The Role of the International Court of Justice As the Principal Judicial Organ of the United Nations

Author: Mohamed Sameh M. Amr

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 9789041120267

Category: Political Science

Page: 447

View: 2541

This volume provides both the student and practitioner of international law and relations with a comprehensive evaluation of important but hitherto neglected aspects of the work of the World Court. It concludes with practical suggestions on how to develop the Court's role.

Nicaragua Before the International Court of Justice

Impacts on International Law

Author: Edgardo Sobenes Obregon,Benjamin Samson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331962962X

Category: Law

Page: 435

View: 2113

This book analyses Nicaragua's role in the development of international law, through its participation in cases that have come before the International Court of Justice. Nicaragua has appeared before the ICJ in fourteen cases, either as an applicant, respondent or intervening State, thus setting an important example of committment to the peaceful judicial settlement of disputes. The “Nicaraguan” cases have enabled the ICJ to take positions on and clarify a whole range of important procedural, jurisdictional and substantive legal issues, which have inspired the jurisprudence of international and regional courts and tribunals and influenced the development of international law. The book focuses on reviewing Nicaragua's cases before the ICJ, using a thematic approach to identify their impact on international law. Each chapter includes a discussion of the relevant cases on a particular theme and their impact over time on general as well as specific branches of international law, notably through their use as precedent by other international and regional courts and tribunals.

Litigation at the International Court of Justice

Practice and Procedure

Author: Juan José Quintana

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004297510

Category: Law

Page: 1364

View: 9114

Litigation at the International Court of Justice provides a systematic guide to questions of procedure arising when States come before the International Court of Justice to take part in contentious litigation.

Boundaries of Discourse in the International Court of Justice

Mapping Arguments in Arab Territorial Disputes

Author: Michelle L. Burgis

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 900417463X

Category: Law

Page: 307

View: 1728

How can Third World experiences of colonialism and statehood be expressed within the confines of the International Court of Justice? How has the discourse of international law developed to reflect postcolonial realities of universal statehood? In a close and critical reading of four territorial disputes spanning the Arab World, Burgis explores the extent to which international law can be used to speak for and speak to non-European experiences of authority over territory. The book draws on recent, critical international legal scholarship to question the ability of contemporary, international adjudication to address Third World grievances from the past. A comparative analysis of the cases suggests that international law remains a discourse only capable of capturing a limited range of non-European experiences during and after colonialism.