The Knowing-doing Gap

How Smart Companies Turn Knowledge Into Action

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer,Robert I. Sutton

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 9781578511242

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 314

View: 5723

"Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert Sutton, identify the causes of the knowing-doing gap and explain how to close it."--Jacket.

The Knowing-Doing Gap

How Smart Companies Turn Knowledge into Action

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer,Robert I. Sutton

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 1422163520

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 8760

Why are there so many gaps between what firms know they should do and what they actually do? Why do so many companies fail to implement the experience and insight they've worked so hard to acquire? The Knowing-Doing Gap is the first book to confront the challenge of turning knowledge about how to improve performance into actions that produce measurable results. Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert Sutton, well-known authors and teachers, identify the causes of the knowing-doing gap and explain how to close it. The message is clear--firms that turn knowledge into action avoid the "smart talk trap." Executives must use plans, analysis, meetings, and presentations to inspire deeds, not as substitutes for action. Companies that act on their knowledge also eliminate fear, abolish destructive internal competition, measure what matters, and promote leaders who understand the work people do in their firms. The authors use examples from dozens of firms that show how some overcome the knowing-doing gap, why others try but fail, and how still others avoid the gap in the first place. The Knowing-Doing Gap is sure to resonate with executives everywhere who struggle daily to make their firms both know and do what they know. It is a refreshingly candid, useful, and realistic guide for improving performance in today's business.

What Were They Thinking?

Unconventional Wisdom about Management

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 1422103129

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 241

View: 5553

The question of how to improve organizational effectiveness through better people management is always top of mind. This book challenges incorrect and oversimplified assumptions and much conventional management wisdom - delivering business commentary that helps business leaders make smarter decisions.

Scaling Up Excellence

Getting to More Without Settling for Less

Author: Robert I. Sutton,Huggy Rao

Publisher: Crown Business

ISBN: 0385347030

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 3644

Wall Street Journal Bestseller "The pick of 2014's management books." –Andrew Hill, Financial Times "One of the top business books of the year." –Harvey Schacter, The Globe and Mail Bestselling author, Robert Sutton and Stanford colleague, Huggy Rao tackle a challenge that determines every organization’s success: how to scale up farther, faster, and more effectively as an organization grows. Sutton and Rao have devoted much of the last decade to uncovering what it takes to build and uncover pockets of exemplary performance, to help spread them, and to keep recharging organizations with ever better work practices. Drawing on inside accounts and case studies and academic research from a wealth of industries-- including start-ups, pharmaceuticals, airlines, retail, financial services, high-tech, education, non-profits, government, and healthcare-- Sutton and Rao identify the key scaling challenges that confront every organization. They tackle the difficult trade-offs that organizations must make between whether to encourage individualized approaches tailored to local needs or to replicate the same practices and customs as an organization or program expands. They reveal how the best leaders and teams develop, spread, and instill the right mindsets in their people-- rather than ruining or watering down the very things that have fueled successful growth in the past. They unpack the principles that help to cascade excellence throughout an organization, as well as show how to eliminate destructive beliefs and behaviors that will hold them back. Scaling Up Excellence is the first major business book devoted to this universal and vexing challenge and it is destined to become the standard bearer in the field.

Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense

Profiting from Evidence-based Management

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer,Robert I. Sutton

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 1422154580

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 276

View: 621

The best organizations have the best talent. . . Financial incentives drive company performance. . . Firms must change or die. Popular axioms like these drive business decisions every day. Yet too much common management “wisdom” isn’t wise at all—but, instead, flawed knowledge based on “best practices” that are actually poor, incomplete, or outright obsolete. Worse, legions of managers use this dubious knowledge to make decisions that are hazardous to organizational health. Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I. Sutton show how companies can bolster performance and trump the competition through evidence-based management, an approach to decision-making and action that is driven by hard facts rather than half-truths or hype. This book guides managers in using this approach to dismantle six widely held—but ultimately flawed—management beliefs in core areas including leadership, strategy, change, talent, financial incentives, and work-life balance. The authors show managers how to find and apply the best practices for their companies, rather than blindly copy what seems to have worked elsewhere. This practical and candid book challenges leaders to commit to evidence-based management as a way of organizational life—and shows how to finally turn this common sense into common practice.

Emotions and Organizational Governance

Author: Neal M. Ashkanasy,Charmine E. J. Härtel,Wilfred J. Zerbe

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 1785609971

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 480

View: 923

This volume of Research on Emotions in Organizations demonstrates the ubiquitousness of emotions and effects of emotions in organizational setting - starting from what goes on in the boardroom, extending right down to the way employees at the coalface interact with their customers every day.

Learning by Doing

A Handbook for Professional Learning Communities at Work TM

Author: Richard DuFour,Rebecca DuFour

Publisher: Solution Tree Press

ISBN: 1935249894

Category: Education

Page: 280

View: 3929

Like the first edition, the second edition of Learning by Doing: A Handbook for Professional Learning Communities at Work helps educators close the knowing-doing gap as they transform their schools into professional learning communities (PLCs).

Weird Ideas That Work

11 1/2 Practices for Promoting, Managing, and Sustaining Innovation

Author: Robert I. Sutton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743212126

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 232

View: 3022

Introduces the proven rules that a company can use to promote innovation, arguing that the corporate world should hire misfits and encourage them to defy the existing culture and actively consider ideas that appear ridiculous or impractical.

Know Can Do!

Put Your Know-How Into Action

Author: Ken Blanchard,Paul J. Meyer,Dick Ruhe

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 1609944291

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 144

View: 3803

Attempting to better themselves—learn new skills, break bad habits, realize their potential—people read books, attend seminars, take training courses. And companies pitch in too, spending billions of dollars every year on professional development programs aimed at helping their employees become more effective. But in spite of what people sincerely believe are their best efforts, all too often their behavior doesn’t change. The fact that it seems to be so hard to make new learning stick is an endless source of frustration for both individuals and organizations. For years Ken Blanchard has been troubled by the gap between what people know—all the good advice they’ve digested intellectually—and what they actually do. In this new book he and his coauthors, Paul J. Meyer and Dick Ruhe, use the fable format Blanchard made famous to lay out a straightforward method for learning more, learning better, and making sure you actually use what you learn. This engaging story identifies three key reasons people don’t make the leap from knowing to doing and then moves on to the solution. It teaches you how to avoid information overload by learning “less more, not more less.” You’ll find out how to adjust your brain’s filtering system to learn many, many times more than ever before, ignite your creativity and resourcefulness with Green Light Thinking, master what you’ve learned using spaced repetition, and more. At last, an answer to the question, “Why don’t I do what I know I should do?” Read this book and you will!

Teach, Reflect, Learn

Building Your Capacity for Success in the Classroom

Author: Pete Hall,Alisa Simeral

Publisher: ASCD

ISBN: 1416620109

Category: Education

Page: 177

View: 4989

“It’s not the doing that matters; it’s the thinking about the doing,” said John Dewey. As a teacher, you work hard to make a positive difference in the lives of your students. But this kind of progress doesn’t happen overnight, and it doesn’t happen accidentally. It’s the result of intentionality, planning, effort . . . and thought. The difference between learning a skill and being able to implement it effectively resides in your capacity to engage in deep, continuous thought about that skill. In other words, recognizing why you do something is often more important than knowing how to do it. To help you deepen your thinking and reflect on your capacity as an educator, Pete Hall and Alisa Simeral return to the Continuum of Self-Reflection, which they introduced to coaches and administrators in their best-selling Building Teachers’ Capacity for Success, and redesign its implementation so you can take charge of your own professional growth. In these pages, you’ll find tools specifically made to enhance self-reflection on professional practice, including the Continuum of Self-Reflection and the Reflective Cycle. You’ll be able to assess your current self-reflective tendencies, identify opportunities to reflect on your instruction, and begin to forge a path toward continuous growth and educational excellence.

The Human Equation

Building Profits by Putting People First

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 9780875848419

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 345

View: 5152

Criticizes many common personnel management practices, and argues that policies such as job security and fair compensation result in greater profits in the long run

Knowledge-Driven Work

Unexpected Lessons from Japanese and United States Work Practices

Author: Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld,Michio Nitta,Betty J. Barrett,Nejib Belhedi,Simon Sai-Chung Chow,Takashi Inaba,Iwao Ishino,Wen-Jeng Lin,Michael Moore

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195344363

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 585

Knowledge-Driven Work is a pioneering study of the cross-cultural iffusion of ideas about the organization of work. These ideas, linked with the knowledge of the workforce, are rapidly becoming the primary source of competitive advantage in the world economy. The book provides an in-depth look at eight Japanese-affiliated manufacturing facilities operating in the United States, combined with examinations of their sister facilities in Japan. The authors offer their insights into the complex process by which elements of work systems in one country interact with those in another. They trace the flow of ideas from Japan to the US and other nations, and the beginnings of a reverse diffusion of innovation back to Japan. The authors organize their findings into six categories: the cross-cultural diffusion of work practices, team-based work systems, kaizen and employee involvement, employment security, human resource management, and labor-management relations. Their study of team-based work systems yields a taxonomy of teams and reveals some conflicts between the desire for self-management and the existence of interdependencies. Investigations into kaizen (ongoing incremental improvement) indicate that its emphasis on employee-driven, systematic problem solving makes it a strong counterpoint to the idea of top-down "re-engineering." Looking at employment security, the authors note that while most US managers believe that it restrains managerial flexibility, managers at the firms they observed see it as essential to the flexibility associated with teamwork and kaizen. The study of human resource management practices suggests competitive advantages in diverse, older, unionized, and urban work forces, and emphasizes the importance of wide-ranging training programs in a work system premised on a long-term perspective. The "wildcard" in the work places observed is labor-management relations, the area in which Japanese managers have been least likely to import their ideas. The authors report on several situations in which existing labor-management structures remained untouched, with mixed results: greater labor-management consultation, for example, but also increased ambiguity of roles. The thread running through all of these areas of work is "virtual knowledge," an ephemeral form of knowledge derived from a particular combination of people focused on a given issue. The authors point out that this powerful form of knowledge is only effectively harnessed in environments that are free of fear, that have established procedures for collective problem-solving, and that have some stability in group composition. They claim that too often companies allow virtual knowledge to dissipate, squandering opportunities to create more competitive workplaces. For those organizations that have succeeded in anticipating and channeling it, however, virtual knowledge leads to a knowledge-driven workplace and continuous improvement.

The No Asshole Rule

Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't

Author: Robert I. Sutton

Publisher: Business Plus

ISBN: 9780759518018

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 2158

The definitive guide to working with -- and surviving -- bullies, creeps, jerks, tyrants, tormentors, despots, backstabbers, egomaniacs, and all the other assholes who do their best to destroy you at work. "What an asshole!" How many times have you said that about someone at work? You're not alone! In this groundbreaking book, Stanford University professor Robert I. Sutton builds on his acclaimed Harvard Business Review article to show you the best ways to deal with assholes...and why they can be so destructive to your company. Practical, compassionate, and in places downright funny, this guide offers: Strategies on how to pinpoint and eliminate negative influences for good Illuminating case histories from major organizations A self-diagnostic test and a program to identify and keep your own "inner jerk" from coming out The No Asshole Rule is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Business Week bestseller.

Managing with Power

Politics and Influence in Organizations

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 9780875844404

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 391

View: 1198

An in-depth look at the role of power and influence in organizations. Pfeffer demonstrates the necessity of power in mobilizing political support and resources to get things done in any organization, and he looks at the personal attributes and structural factors that help managers advance organizational goals and achieve individual success.

Hidden Value

How Great Companies Achieve Extraordinary Results with Ordinary People

Author: Charles A. O'Reilly,Jeffrey Pfeffer

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 9780875848983

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 286

View: 4174

Discover How the Best Companies Win Not By Acquiring the Right People--But By Building the Right Organization The "war for talent" is one battle every company believes it should be waging. But while competitors are busy chasing after the same "hot" individuals, smart companies are doing something infinitely more useful and far more difficult to copy--they're building organizations that make it possible for ordinary people at every desk and cubicle in their companies to perform as if they were stars. Blowing up the prevailing wisdom that companies must chase and acquire top talent in order to remain successful,Hidden Valueargues instead that the source of sustained competitive advantage already exists within every organization. O'Reilly and Pfeffer, leading experts on organizational behavior and human resources, argue that how a firm creates and uses talent is far more important than how the firm attracts talent. The authors provide vivid, detailed case studies of several organizations in widely disparate industries--including Southwest Airlines, Cisco Systems, The Men's Wearhouse, and NUMMI--to illustrate how long-term success comes from value-driven, interrelated systems that align good people management with corporate strategy. In a refreshing break from management tomes that force-feed superficial frameworks and trite "rules," the authors instead allow the company stories to take center stage. They guide readers in discovering for themselves how seven different firms maximize talent, why one firm hasn't fully released the hidden value in its work force, and, most importantly, how the winning companies have made it tough for competitors to imitate them. Collectively, the stories reveal a common path to success that places values before strategy, emphasizes implementation over planning, and focuses on getting the best out of all employees, not just individual stars. The authors also explore concerns or questions managers might have about how each company's experience parallels or conflicts with their own. Providing a rare opportunity for managers to actively participate in an invaluable learning process,Hidden Valueoffers a customizable template for building high-performance, people-centered organizations.

Dying for a Paycheck

How Modern Management Harms Employee Health and Company Performance—and What We Can Do About It

Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062800930

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 3212

In one survey, 61 percent of employees said that workplace stress had made them sick and 7 percent said they had actually been hospitalized. Job stress costs US employers more than $300 billion annually and may cause 120,000 excess deaths each year. In China, 1 million people a year may be dying from overwork. People are literally dying for a paycheck. And it needs to stop. In this timely, provocative book, Jeffrey Pfeffer contends that many modern management commonalities such as long work hours, work-family conflict, and economic insecurity are toxic to employees—hurting engagement, increasing turnover, and destroying people’s physical and emotional health—and also inimical to company performance. He argues that human sustainability should be as important as environmental stewardship. You don’t have to do a physically dangerous job to confront a health-destroying, possibly life-threatening, workplace. Just ask the manager in a senior finance role whose immense workload, once handled by several employees, required frequent all-nighters—leading to alcohol and drug addiction. Or the dedicated news media producer whose commitment to getting the story resulted in a sixty-pound weight gain thanks to having no down time to eat properly or exercise. Or the marketing professional prescribed antidepressants a week after joining her employer. In Dying for a Paycheck, Jeffrey Pfeffer marshals a vast trove of evidence and numerous examples from all over the world to expose the infuriating truth about modern work life: even as organizations allow management practices that literally sicken and kill their employees, those policies do not enhance productivity or the bottom line, thereby creating a lose-lose situation. Exploring a range of important topics including layoffs, health insurance, work-family conflict, work hours, job autonomy, and why people remain in toxic environments, Pfeffer offers guidance and practical solutions all of us—employees, employers, and the government—can use to enhance workplace wellbeing. We must wake up to the dangers and enormous costs of today’s workplace, Pfeffer argues. Dying for a Paycheck is a clarion call for a social movement focused on human sustainability. Pfeffer makes clear that the environment we work in is just as important as the one we live in, and with this urgent book, he opens our eyes and shows how we can make our workplaces healthier and better.

Reach the Highest Standard in Professional Learning: Learning Communities

Author: Shirley M. Hord,Patricia Roy

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN: 1452291837

Category: Education

Page: 103

View: 312

Part of a groundbreaking 7-book series, co-developed by Learning Forward and Corwin, this book closes the "knowing-doing" gap by guiding educational leaders through the process for implementing the Learning Forward Standard for Professional Learning: Learning Communities. Tackling the Learning Communities standard, it provides: Original essays written by leading experts in the field to promote deeper understandings of the meaning of the Learning Communities standard An array of templates, tools, and protocols to help you design and delivery quality professional learning in your own district or school Case studies of districts "getting it right" and educators who have realized the promise of effective professional learning.

Buried by the Times

The Holocaust and America's Most Important Newspaper

Author: Laurel Leff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521812870

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 426

View: 832

Looks at decisions made at The New York Times that resulted in the minimizing, misunderstanding, and dilution of the Holocaust in a behind-the-scenes study of how America's premier newspaper failed in its coverage of the fate of European Jews.

Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain

Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

Author: Zaretta Hammond

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN: 1483308022

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 5254

A bold, brain-based teaching approach to culturally responsive instruction To close the achievement gap, diverse classrooms need a proven framework for optimizing student engagement. Culturally responsive instruction has shown promise, but many teachers have struggled with its implementation—until now. In this book, Zaretta Hammond draws on cutting-edge neuroscience research to offer an innovative approach for designing and implementing brain-compatible culturally responsive instruction. The book includes: Information on how one’s culture programs the brain to process data and affects learning relationships Ten “key moves” to build students’ learner operating systems and prepare them to become independent learners Prompts for action and valuable self-reflection