The Memory Code: The Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Other Ancient Monuments

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681773821

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 9205

The discovery of a powerful memory technique used by our Neolithic ancestors in their monumental memory places—and how we can use their secrets to train our own minds In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem. Using traditional Aboriginal Australian song lines as a starting point, Dr. Lynne Kelly has since identified the powerful memory technique used by our ancestors and indigenous people around the world. In turn, she has then discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret purpose behind the great prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, which have puzzled archaeologists for so long. The henges across northern Europe, the elaborate stone houses of New Mexico, huge animal shapes in Peru, the statues of Easter Island—these all serve as the most effective memory system ever invented by humans. They allowed people in non-literate cultures to memorize the vast amounts of information they needed to survive. But how? For the first time, Dr. Klly unlocks the secret of these monuments and their uses as "memory places" in her fascinating book. Additionally, The Memory Code also explains how we can use this ancient mnemonic technique to train our minds in the tradition of our forbearers.

The Memory Code

Unlocking the Secrets of the Lives of the Ancients and the Power of the Human Mind

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN: 1782399070

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 759

In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem. Using traditional Aboriginal Australian song lines as a starting point, Lynne Kelly has since identified the powerful memory technique used by our ancestors and indigenous people around the world. In turn, she has then discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret purpose behind the great prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, which have puzzled archaeologists for so long. The stone circles across Britain and northern Europe, the elaborate stone houses of New Mexico, huge animal shapes in Peru, the statues of Easter Island - these all serve as the most effective memory system ever invented by humans. They allowed people in non-literate cultures to memorize the vast amounts of information they needed to survive. But how? For the first time, Lynne Kelly reveals the purpose of these monuments and their uses as 'memory places', and shows how we can use this ancient technique to train our minds.

The Memory Code

The traditional Aboriginal memory technique that unlocks the secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and ancient monuments the world over

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 1952534283

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 6326

In the past, the elders had encyclopaedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across the landscape, and the stars in the sky too. Yet most of us struggle to memorise more than a short poem. Using traditional Aboriginal Australian songlines as the key, Lynne Kelly has identified the powerful memory technique used by indigenous people around the world. She has discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret behind the great stone monuments like Stonehenge, which have for so long puzzled archaeologists. The stone circles across Britain and northern Europe, the elaborate stone houses of New Mexico, the huge animal shapes at Nasca in Peru, and the statues of Easter Island all serve as the most effective memory system ever invented by humans. They allowed people in non-literate cultures to memorise the vast amounts of practical information they needed to survive. In her fascinating book The Memory Code, Lynne Kelly shows us how we can use this ancient technique to train our memories today.

Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies

Orality, Memory, and the Transmission of Culture

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107059372

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 3397

In this book, Lynne Kelly explores the role of formal knowledge systems in small-scale oral cultures in both historic and archaeological contexts. In the first part, she examines knowledge systems within historically recorded oral cultures, showing how the link between power and the control of knowledge is established. Analyzing the material mnemonic devices used by documented oral cultures, she demonstrates how early societies maintained a vast corpus of pragmatic information concerning animal behavior, plant properties, navigation, astronomy, genealogies, laws and trade agreements, among other matters. In the second part Kelly turns to the archaeological record of three sites, Chaco Canyon, Poverty Point and Stonehenge, offering new insights into the purpose of the monuments and associated decorated objects. This book demonstrates how an understanding of rational intellect, pragmatic knowledge and mnemonic technologies in prehistoric societies offers a new tool for analysis of monumental structures built by non-literate cultures.

The Memory Code

The Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Other Ancient Monuments

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781681777436

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 2500

The discovery of a powerful memory technique used by our Neolithic ancestors in their monumental memory places--and how we can use their secrets to train our own minds

Singing Saltwater Country

Journey to the Songlines of Carpentaria

Author: John Bradley,Yanyuwa Families

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 1742690920

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 335

View: 7458

John Bradley's compelling account of three decades living with the Yanyuwa people of the Gulf of Carpentaria and of how the elders revealed to him the ancient songlines of their Dreaming.

The Skeptic's Guide to the Paranormal

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 9781741140590

Category: Combustion, Spontaneous human

Page: 260

View: 1415

A rational explanation of 27 paranormal phenomena - from walking over hot coals to spontaneous combustion - that appear to defy the laws of science.

The Origins and Ancient History of Wine

Food and Nutrition in History and Antropology

Author: Patrick E. McGovern,Stuart J. Fleming,Solomon H. Katz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135300941

Category: Political Science

Page: 440

View: 9573

This volume presents contemporary evidence scientific, archaeological, botanical, textual, and historical for major revisions in our understanding of winemaking in antiquity. Among the subjects covered are the domestication of the Vinifera grape, the wine trade, the iconography of ancient wine, and the analytical and archaeological challenges posed by ancient wines. The essayists argue that wine existed as long ago as 3500 BC, almost half a millennium earlier than experts believed. Discover named these findings among the most important in 1991. Featuring the work of 23 internationally known scholars and writers, the book offers the first wide ranging treatment of wine in the early history of western Asia and the Mediterranean. Comprehensive and accessible while providing full documentation, it is sure to serve as a catalyst for future research.

Extreme Measures

Finding a Better Path to the End of Life

Author: Jessica Nutik Zitter

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101982551

Category: MEDICAL

Page: 338

View: 832

In medical school, no one teaches you how to let a patient die. Currently, the old and the ill are intubated, catheterised, and even shelved away in care facilities to live out their final days alone, confused, and sometimes in pain. In her work, Zitter has learned to understand that what patients fear more than death itself is the prospect of dying alone. Filled with the kinds of rich patient stories that make the most compelling medical narratives, Extreme Measures thoughtfully and compassionately examines an experience that defines being human.

Lost Knowledge of the Imagination

Author: Gary Lachman

Publisher: Floris Books

ISBN: 1782504575

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 9361

The ability to imagine is at the heart of what makes us human. Through our imagination we experience more fully the world both around us and within us. Imagination plays a key role in creativity and innovation. Until the seventeenth century, the human imagination was celebrated. Since then, with the emergence of science as the dominant worldview, imagination has been marginalised -- depicted as a way of escaping reality, rather than knowing it more profoundly -- and its significance to our humanity has been downplayed. Yet as we move further into the strange new dimensions of the twenty-first century, the need to regain this lost knowledge seems more necessary than ever before. This insightful and inspiring book argues that, for the sake of our future in the world, we must reclaim the ability to imagine and redress the balance of influence between imagination and science. Through the work of Owen Barfield, Goethe, Henry Corbin, Kathleen Raine, and others, and ranging from the teachings of ancient mystics to the latest developments in neuroscience, The Lost Knowledge of the Imagination draws us back to a philosophy and tradition that restores imagination to its rightful place, essential to our knowing reality to the full, and to our very humanity itself.

Making

Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture

Author: Tim Ingold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136763678

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 3668

Making creates knowledge, builds environments and transforms lives. Anthropology, archaeology, art and architecture are all ways of making, and all are dedicated to exploring the conditions and potentials of human life. In this exciting book, Tim Ingold ties the four disciplines together in a way that has never been attempted before. In a radical departure from conventional studies that treat art and architecture as compendia of objects for analysis, Ingold proposes an anthropology and archaeology not of but with art and architecture. He advocates a way of thinking through making in which sentient practitioners and active materials continually answer to, or ‘correspond’, with one another in the generation of form. Making offers a series of profound reflections on what it means to create things, on materials and form, the meaning of design, landscape perception, animate life, personal knowledge and the work of the hand. It draws on examples and experiments ranging from prehistoric stone tool-making to the building of medieval cathedrals, from round mounds to monuments, from flying kites to winding string, from drawing to writing. The book will appeal to students and practitioners alike, with interests in social and cultural anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art and design, visual studies and material culture.

The Memory Code

Unlocking the Secrets of the Lives of the Ancients and the Power of the Human Mind

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Atlantic Books (UK)

ISBN: 9781782399056

Category: Civilization, Ancient

Page: 318

View: 813

In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem. Using traditional Aboriginal Australian song lines as a starting point, Lynne Kelly has since identified the powerful memory technique used by our ancestors and indigenous people around the world. In turn, she has then discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret purpose behind the great prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, which have puzzled archaeologists for so long. Originally published: Australia: Allen & Unwin, 2016.

The Oldest Enigma of Humanity

The Key to the Mystery of the Paleolithic Cave Paintings

Author: Bertrand David,Jean-Jacques Lefrère

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN: 1628723939

Category: Art

Page: 176

View: 9138

A mystery spanning thousands of years—and a compelling study of early mankind and the first sparks of human artistic creativity. Thirty thousand years ago, our prehistoric ancestors painted perfect images of animals on walls of tortuous caves, most often without any light. How was this possible? What meaning and messages did the cavemen want these paintings to convey? In addition, how did these perfect drawings come about at a time when primitive man's sole purpose was surviving? And why, some ten thousand years later, did startlingly similar animal paintings appear once again, on dark cave walls? Scholars and archaeologists have for centuries pored over these works of art, speculating and hoping to come away with the key to the mystery. No one has ever come close to elucidating the paintings’ origin and meaning—until now. Here, the stunning truth is revealed by artist Bertrand David and Professor Jean-Jacques Lefrère, giving us a new understanding of an art lost in time, explaining what had once been unexplainable, and solving the oldest enigma in humanity.

Secrets of Stonehenge

Author: Mick Manning

Publisher: Frances Lincoln Children's Books

ISBN: 9781847805201

Category: Stonehenge (England)

Page: 32

View: 9748

Why was this amazing monument erected? How did our Stone-Age ancestors bring such massive stones to the site from so far away? How did they raise the enormous stones to their upright positions? What was Stonehenge used for, and who lived around the site? With captions and pictures, and using up-to-the-minute research discoveries, Mick Manning and Brita Granström tell the incredible true story of this awe-inspiring monument – one of the greatest ancient sites in the world.

The Fifth Beginning

What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us about Our Future

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520293126

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 4365

ÒI have seen yesterday. I know tomorrow.Ó This inscription in TutankhamunÕs tomb summarizesÊThe Fifth Beginning. Here, archaeologist Robert L. Kelly explains how the study of our cultural past can predict the future of humanity. Ê In an eminently readable style, Kelly identifies four key pivot points in the six-million-year history of human development: the emergence of technology, culture, agriculture, and the state. In each example, the author examines the long-term processes that resulted in a definitive, no-turning-backÊchange for the organization of society. Kelly then looks ahead, giving us evidence for what he calls aÊfifth beginning, one that started about AD 1500. Some might call it Òglobalization,Ó but the author places it in its larger context:Êa five-thousand-year arms race, capitalismÕs global reach, and the cultural effects of a worldwide communication network. Ê Kelly predicts that the emergent phenomena of this fifth beginning will include the end of war as a viable way to resolve disputes, the end of capitalism as we know it, the widespread shift toward world citizenship, and the rise of forms of cooperation that will end the near-sacred status of nation-states. ItÕs the end of life as we have known it. However, the author is cautiously optimistic: he dwells not on the coming chaos, but on humanityÕs great potential. Ê Ê

Crocodile

Evolution's greatest survivor

Author: Lynne Kelly

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 9781741761917

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 6110

An ancient animal whose ancestors have roamed the earth since the time of the dinosaurs, the crocodile has survived continental drift, ice ages and the loss of once-prolific species. Today, the Australian saltie, the Chinese alligator, the Indian gharial and the black caiman are just some of the twenty-three species of crocodilian descendants found across the world. Human interaction with these dangerous yet intriguing animals has been reflected in myths and legends dating back to earliest recorded history. Feared or revered, crocodilians have always fascinated. Sadly, many breeds of this seemingly indestructible species are now facing extinction because of human activity, intrusion into their habitats and retaliation for the threat they pose to humans. This is the fascinating and extraordinary story of the crocodile, one of evolution's greatest survivors. Lynne Kelly has been teaching science, mathematics and gifted education for over 30 years. She holds a degree in engineering, education and computing, and is the author of numerous books and online courses for education, a novel and a popular science title, The Skeptic's Guide to the Paranormal.

The Biggest Estate on Earth

How Aborigines Made Australia

Author: Bill Gammage

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 174331132X

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 2135

Reveals the complex, country-wide systems of land management used by Aboriginal people in presettlement Australia Across Australia, early Europeans commented again and again that the land looked like a park, with extensive grassy patches and pathways, open woodlands, and abundant wildlife. Bill Gammage has discovered this was because Aboriginal people managed the land in a far more systematic and scientific fashion than most people have ever realized. For more than a decade, he has examined written and visual records of the Australian landscape. He has uncovered an extraordinarily complex system of land management using fire, the life cycles of native plants, and the natural flow of water to ensure plentiful wildlife and plant foods throughout the year. Aboriginal people spent far less time and effort than Europeans in securing food and shelter, and this book reveals how. Once Aboriginal people were no longer able to tend their country, it became overgrown and vulnerable to the hugely damaging bushfires Australians now experience. With details of land-management strategies from around Australia, this book rewrites the history of the continent, with huge implications for today.

The Creative Spark

How Imagination Made Humans Exceptional

Author: Agustín Fuentes

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101983957

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 1724

A bold new synthesis of paleontology, archaeology, genetics, and anthropology that overturns misconceptions about race, war and peace, and human nature itself, answering an age-old question: What made humans so exceptional among all the species on Earth? Creativity. It is the secret of what makes humans special, hiding in plain sight. Agustín Fuentes argues that your child's finger painting comes essentially from the same place as creativity in hunting and gathering millions of years ago, and throughout history in making war and peace, in intimate relationships, in shaping the planet, in our communities, and in all of art, religion, and even science. It requires imagination and collaboration. Every poet has her muse; every engineer, an architect; every politician, a constituency. The manner of the collaborations varies widely, but successful collaboration is inseparable from imagination, and it brought us everything from knives and hot meals to iPhones and interstellar spacecraft. Weaving fascinating stories of our ancient ancestors' creativity, Fuentes finds the patterns that match modern behavior in humans and animals. This key quality has propelled the evolutionary development of our bodies, minds, and cultures, both for good and for bad. It's not the drive to reproduce; nor competition for mates, or resources, or power; nor our propensity for caring for one another that have separated us out from all other creatures. As Fuentes concludes, to make something lasting and useful today you need to understand the nature of your collaboration with others, what imagination can and can't accomplish, and, finally, just how completely our creativity is responsible for the world we live in. Agustín Fuentes's resounding multimillion-year perspective will inspire readers—and spark all kinds of creativity.

Anthropology For Dummies

Author: Cameron M. Smith

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470507691

Category: Social Science

Page: 388

View: 8062

Covers the latest competing theories in the field Get a handle on the fundamentals of biological and culturalanthropology When did the first civilizations arise? How many human languagesexist? The answers are found in anthropology - and this friendlyguide explains its concepts in clear detail. You'll see howanthropology developed as a science, what it tells us about ourancestors, and how it can help with some of the hot-button issuesour world is facing today. Discover: How anthropologists learn about the past Humanity's earliest activities, from migration tocivilization Why our language differs from other animal communication How to find a career in anthropology