The Mind of the South

Author: W. J. Cash

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Southern States

Page: 429

View: 479

The Mind of the South

Author: N.A

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781617035043

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1640

The Mind of the South

Author: Wilbur Joseph Cash

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 9143

Discusses Southern culture and social conditions, and describes the intellectual attitudes of the New South

The New Mind of the South

Author: Tracy Thompson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439158479

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2974

The award-winning author of The Beast: A Reckoning with Depression challenges stereotypes and fallacies to reveal the true heart of the South today, explaining how traditions about adapting are responsible for key changes while assessing the influence of Latino immigrants throughout the past half century.

The Mind of the Master Class

History and Faith in the Southern Slaveholders' Worldview

Author: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese,Eugene D. Genovese

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139446563

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8936

The Mind of the Master Class tells of America's greatest historical tragedy. It presents the slaveholders as men and women, a great many of whom were intelligent, honorable, and pious. It asks how people who were admirable in so many ways could have presided over a social system that proved itself an enormity and inflicted horrors on their slaves. The South had formidable proslavery intellectuals who participated fully in transatlantic debates and boldly challenged an ascendant capitalist ('free-labor') society. Blending classical and Christian traditions, they forged a moral and political philosophy designed to sustain conservative principles in history, political economy, social theory, and theology, while translating them into political action. Even those who judge their way of life most harshly have much to learn from their probing moral and political reflections on their times - and ours - beginning with the virtues and failings of their own society and culture.

Front Line

A Tour Through the Mind of the South

Author: Jimmy Washburn

Publisher: Author House

ISBN: 1467817783

Category: Political Science

Page: 132

View: 4835

In our zest for the good life and money we have pushed aside the addage that, whats good for one is good for all. It has distorted actions that would have brought about an even greater Nation. The voting of leadership, moral standards and proper teaching of our young are but the beginning. Instilling God in the minds of our young future leaders. Teaching and promise of certain rights and practices. Highlighting our right to practice our belief anywhere we desire gurantees our inalienable rights. To take away these rights takes away the freedom this country was built upon. Given are some problems, causes and solutions. Lightheartedly written, but presenting the seriousness of the problem. Showing a need for complete restoration to a time when we felt free to exercise the rights provided us through the declarations of our forefathers.

A Consuming Fire

The Fall of the Confederacy in the Mind of the White Christian South

Author: Eugene D. Genovese

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820340707

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 9385

The fall of the Confederacy proved traumatic for a people who fought with the belief that God was on their side. Yet, as Eugene D. Genovese writes in A Consuming Fire, Southern Christians continued to trust in the Lord's will. The churches had long defended "southern rights" and insisted upon the divine sanction for slavery, but they also warned that God was testing His people, who must bring slavery up to biblical standards or face the wrath of an angry God. In the eyes of proslavery theorists, clerical and lay, social relations and material conditions affected the extent and pace of the spread of the Gospel and men's preparation to receive it. For proslavery spokesmen, "Christian slavery" offered the South, indeed the world, the best hope for the vital work of preparation for the Kingdom, but they acknowledged that, from a Christian point of view, the slavery practiced in the South left much to be desired. For them, the struggle to reform, or rather transform, social relations was nothing less than a struggle to justify the trust God placed in them when He sanctioned slavery. The reform campaign of prominent ministers and church laymen featured demands to secure slave marriages and family life, repeal the laws against slave literacy, and punish cruel masters. A Consuming Fire analyzes the strength, weakness, and failure of the struggle for reform and the nature and significance of southern Christian orthodoxy and its vision of a proper social order, class structure, and race relations.

The South of the Mind

American Imaginings of White Southernness, 1960–1980

Author: Zachary J. Lechner

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820353701

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 7376

Redefining Southern Culture

Mind and Identity in the Modern South

Author: James Charles Cobb

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820321394

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 6131

Cobb, "surveys the remarkable story of southern identity and its persistence in the face of sweeping changes in the South's economy, society and political structure."--dust jacket.

Rethinking the South

Essays in Intellectual History

Author: Michael O'Brien

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820315256

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 342

Bringing together Michael O’Brien’s pathbreaking essays on the American South, this book examines the persistence and vitality of southern intellectual history from the early nineteenth century to the present day. At once a broad survey of southern thought and a meditation on the subject as an academic discipline, Rethinking the South deftly integrates social history, literary criticism, and historiography as it positions the South within the wider traditions of European and American culture. In his thoughtful introduction and throughout the ten essays that follow, O'Brien stresses the tradition of Romanticism as a central theme, binding togethere figures as disparate as critic Hugh Legare, literary scholar Edwin Mims, poets Richard Henry Wilde and Allen Tate, and historians W. J. Cash and C. Vann Woodward. First published as a collection in 1988, these essays confirm O’Brien’s position as a pioneer in establishing and defining the enterprise of southern intellectual history.

Corra Harris and the Divided Mind of the New South

Author: Catherine Oglesby

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 8639

During her life, Corra Harris (1869-1935) was one of the most widely published and popular female writers in the United States. In addition to dozens of books, her work appeared frequently in major national publications such as Saturday Evening Post, Harper's, Good Housekeeping, and Ladies Home Journal. Critics have often dismissed her claim to prominence, choosing to view her as a writer of domestic fiction. At the same time, she was widely praised for her expressions of wit and candor. A Circuit Rider's Wife (1910) was Georgia's most celebrated novel for nearly three decades. Now little read and almost forgotten. Harris's life offers a fascinating glimpse into a world nearly unimaginable to us today.

Away Down South

A History of Southern Identity

Author: James C. Cobb

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199839301

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 587

From the seventeenth century Cavaliers and Uncle Tom's Cabin to Civil Rights museums and today's conflicts over the Confederate flag, here is a brilliant portrait of southern identity, served in an engaging blend of history, literature, and popular culture. In this insightful book, written with dry wit and sharp insight, James C. Cobb explains how the South first came to be seen--and then came to see itself--as a region apart from the rest of America. As Cobb demonstrates, the legend of the aristocratic Cavalier origins of southern planter society was nurtured by both northern and southern writers, only to be challenged by abolitionist critics, black and white. After the Civil War, defeated and embittered southern whites incorporated the Cavalier myth into the cult of the "Lost Cause," which supplied the emotional energy for their determined crusade to rejoin the Union on their own terms. After World War I, white writers like Ellen Glasgow, William Faulkner and other key figures of "Southern Renaissance" as well as their African American counterparts in the "Harlem Renaissance"--Cobb is the first to show the strong links between the two movements--challenged the New South creed by asking how the grandiose vision of the South's past could be reconciled with the dismal reality of its present. The Southern self-image underwent another sea change in the wake of the Civil Rights movement, when the end of white supremacy shook the old definition of the "Southern way of life"--but at the same time, African Americans began to examine their southern roots more openly and embrace their regional, as well as racial, identity. As the millennium turned, the South confronted a new identity crisis brought on by global homogenization: if Southern culture is everywhere, has the New South become the No South? Here then is a major work by one of America's finest Southern historians, a magisterial synthesis that combines rich scholarship with provocative new insights into what the South means to southerners and to America as well.

The Southern Press

Literary Legacies and the Challenge of Modernity

Author: Douglas O. Cumming

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810123940

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 316

View: 1206

The Southern journalist was more likely to be a Romantic and an intellectual. The region's journalism was personal, colorful, and steeped in the classics. This title suggests that the South's journalism struck a literary pose closer to the older English press than to the democratic penny press or bourgeois magazines of the urban North.

Southern History Across the Color Line

Author: Nell Irvin Painter

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807853603

Category: History

Page: 247

View: 5221

This work reaches across the colour line to examine how race, gender, class and individual subjectivity shaped the lives of black and white women in the 19th- and 20th-century American South.