The New Criminology

For a Social Theory of Deviance

Author: Ian Taylor,Paul Walton,Jock Young

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135006865

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 2233

"The New Criminology was written at a particular time and place; it was a product of 1968 and its aftermath: a world turned upside down .It was a time of great changes in personal politics and a surge of politics on the left: Marxism, Anarchism, Situationism as well as radical social democratic ideas became centre stage." Jock Young, from the new introduction. Taylor, Walton and Young’s The New Criminology is one of the seminal texts in Criminology. First published in 1973, it marked a watershed moment in the development of critical criminological theory and is as relevant today as it was forty years ago. It was one of the first texts to bridge the gap between criminological and sociological theory and demonstrated the weaknesses of classical and positivist criminology. Critics at the time saw it as the first truly comprehensive critique of Anglo-American studies of crime and deviance. Reproduced unabridged, the fortieth anniversary edition includes a brand new introductory essay from Jock Young placing the book in its intellectual context and sequence and looking at the theories which built up to it and the theories that have been built upon since. It is essential reading for all serious students engaged in criminological theory and is destined to inspire future generations.

The New Criminology

For a Social Theory of Deviance

Author: Ian R. Taylor,Paul Walton,Jock Young

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415034477

Category: Social Science

Page: 325

View: 3006

A major contribution to criminology in which Taylor, Walton and Young provide a framework for a fully social theory of crime.

The New Criminology Revisited

Author: P. Walton,J. Young

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1349261971

Category: Social Science

Page: 302

View: 746

In 1973 The New Criminology was published and quickly established itself as a key textbook in criminology, casting a major influence over a generation of scholars. It has remained in print ever since. This volume, published twenty-five years later, traces the major developments in the field including feminism, postmodernism, critical criminology and realism. The articles are by leading authorities from Britain, the United States and Australia and include Stan Cohen, Elliott Currie, Pat Carlen and Kerry Carrington as well as separate commentaries by the three original authors themselves: Ian Taylor, Paul Walton and Jock Young.

Critical Criminology

Author: Ian Taylor

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415519438

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 6285

First published in 1975, this collection of essays expands upon the themes and ideas developed in the editors' previous work, the visionary and groundbreaking text: The New Criminology. Directed at orthodox criminology, this is a partisan work written by a group of criminologists committed to a social transformation: a transformation to a society that does not criminalize deviance. Included are American contributions, particularly from the School of Criminology at Berkeley, represented by Hermann and Julia Schwendinger and Tony Platt, together with essays by Richard Quinney and William Chambliss. From Britain, Geoff Pearson considers deviancy theory as 'misfit sociology' and Paul Hirst attacks deviancy theory from an Althusserian Marxist position. The editors contribute a detailed introductory essay extending the position developed in The New Criminology, and two other pieces which attempt to continue the task of translating criminology from its traditional correctionalist stance to a commitment to socialist diversity and a crime-free set of social arrangements.

Shades of Deviance

A Primer on Crime, Deviance and Social Harm

Author: Rowland Atkinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317907221

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 9080

Written in a unique format, Shades of Deviance is a turbo-driven guide to crime and deviance, offering 56 politically engaged, thought-provoking and accessibly written accounts of a wide range of socially and legally prohibited acts. This book will be essential reading for undergraduate students in the fields of criminology and sociology and those preparing to embark on degree courses in these fields, as well as general readers. Written by field-leading experts from across the globe and designed for those who want a clear and exciting introduction to the complex areas of crime and deviance, this book provides a large number of short overviews of a wide range of social problems, harms and criminal acts. Offering a series of cutting-edge and critical treatments of issues such as war and murder, paedophilia, ecocide, human experimentation, stalking and sexting, this book also gives a guide to further readings and suggestions for other media to develop the reader’s understanding of these issues. Shades of Deviance requires readers to critically reconsider their ideas about what is right and wrong, about what is socially harmful and which problems we should focus our attention on. It also provides careful analysis and reasoned explanation of complex issues in a world in which sensationalist headlines, anxiety and fear about crime permeate our lives - read it to be prepared!

Sexual Deviance and Society

A sociological examination

Author: Meredith G. F. Worthen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317593367

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 346

In a society where sexualized media has become background noise, we are frequently discouraged from frank and open discussions about sex and offered few tools for understanding sexual behaviors and sexualities that are perceived as being out of the norm. This book encourages readers to establish new ways of thinking about stigmatized peoples and behaviors, and to think critically about gender, sex, sexuality and sex crimes. Sexual Deviance and Society uses sociological theories of crime, deviance, gender and sexuality to construct a framework for understanding sexual deviance. This book is divided into four units: Unit I, Sociology of Deviance and Sexuality, lays the foundation for understanding sex and sexuality through sociological frameworks of deviance. Unit II, Sexual Deviance, provides an in depth dialogue to its readers about the sociological constructions of sexual deviance with a critical focus on contemporary and historical conceptualizations. Unit III, Deviant Sexual Acts, explores a variety of deviant sexual acts in detail, including sex in public, fetishes, and sex work. Unit IV, Sex Crimes and Criminals, examines rape and sexual assault, sex crimes against children, and societal responses to sex offenders and their treatment within the criminal justice system. Utilizing an integrative approach that creates a dialogue between the subjects of gender, criminology and deviance, this book is a key resource for students interested in crime and deviance, gender and sexuality, and the sociology of deviance.

Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime

Author: Gary Jensen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351490117

Category: Social Science

Page: 386

View: 9997

Social learning theory has been called the dominant theory of crime and delinquency in the United States, yet it is often misrepresented. This latest volume in the distinguished Advances in Criminological Theory series explores the impact of this theory. Some equate it with differential association theory. Others depict it as little more than a micro-level appendage to cultural deviance theories. There have been earlier attempts to clarify the theory's unique features in comparison to other theories, and others have applied it to broader issues. These efforts are extended in this volume, which focuses on developing, applying, and testing the theory on a variety of criminal and delinquent behavior. It applies the theory to treatment and prevention, moving social learning into a global context for the twenty-first century. This comprehensive volume includes the latest work, tests, and theoretical advances in social learning theory and will be particularly helpful to criminologists, sociologists, and psychologists. It may also be of interest to those concerned with current issues relating to delinquency, drug use/abuse, and drinking/alcohol abuse.

Criminology

A Sociological Introduction

Author: Eamonn Carrabine,Maggy Lee,Paul Iganski

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415281687

Category: Social Science

Page: 428

View: 4841

This sociological introduction provides a much-needed textbook for an increasingly popular area of study. Written by a team of authors with a broad range of teaching and individual expertise, it covers almost every module offered in UK criminological courses and will be valuable to students of criminology worldwide. It covers: key traditions in criminology, their critical assessment and more recent developments new ways of thinking about crime and control, including crime and emotions, drugs and alcohol, from a public health perspective different dimensions of the problem of crime and misconduct, including crime and sexuality, crimes against the environment, crime and human rights and organizational deviance key debates in criminological theory the criminal justice system new areas such as the globalization of crime, and crime in cyberspace. Specially designed to be user-friendly, each chapter contains boxed material on current controversies, key thinkers and examples of crime and criminal justice around the world with statistical tables, maps, summaries, critical thinking questions, annotated references and a glossary of key terms, as well as further reading sections and additional resource information as weblinks.

Encyclopedia of Social Deviance

Author: Craig J. Forsyth,Heith Copes

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483364690

Category: Social Science

Page: 864

View: 2759

Social deviance does not involve just criminal behavior—it’s any behavior that violates a cultural norm, and that can involve something as minor as consistently and deliberately wearing lively mismatched socks. Moreover, whether a crime, a sin, or simply unique taste, what’s considered deviant at one time and place can change, as when extensive tattooing and "body art" evolved from a sideshow carnival spectacle to a nearly universal rite of passage within U.S. culture. Drawing contributions from across the social and behavioral sciences, including sociology, anthropology, criminology, politics, psychology, and religion, the Encyclopedia of Social Deviance introduces students to this lively field of rule-making and rebellion that strikes at the core of what it means to be an individual living in a social world. Key Features: More than 300 articles are organized A-to-Z in two volumes available in both electronic and print formats. Articles, authored by key figures in the field, conclude with cross-reference links and further readings. Although organized A-to-Z, a thematic “Reader’s Guide” groups related articles by broad areas (e.g., Concepts; Theories; Research Methodologies; Individual Deviance; Organizational Deviance; etc.) as one handy search feature on the e-Reference platform, which also includes a comprehensive index of search terms.

Understanding Deviance

A Guide to the Sociology of Crime and Rule-Breaking

Author: David Downes,Paul Rock,Eugene McLaughlin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198747349

Category:

Page: 424

View: 7097

In Understanding Deviance, Seventh Edition, leading experts David Downes, Paul Rock, and Eugene McLaughlin examine the major sociological theories behind crime and deviance, covering their development, recent research, and varying perspectives on their explanations of criminality. The authors discuss key debates in depth, challenging students to question assumptions and explore new avenues of scholarship. An extensive bibliography provides references to a wide range of both classic and lesser-known texts.

Routledge Handbook on Deviance

Author: Stephen E. Brown,Ophir Sefiha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131729985X

Category: Social Science

Page: 544

View: 8038

The Routledge Handbook on Deviance brings together original contributions on deviance, with a focus on new, emerging, and hidden forms of deviant behavior. The editors have curated a comprehensive collection highlighting the relativity of deviance, with chapters exploring the deviant behaviors related to sport, recreation, body modification, chronic health conditions, substance use, religion and cults, political extremism, sexuality, online interaction, mental and emotional disorders, elite societal status, workplace issues, and lifestyle. The selections review competing definitions and orientations and a wide range of theoretical premises while addressing methodological issues involved in the study of deviance. Each section begins with an introduction by the editors, anchoring the topics in relevant theoretical and methodological contexts and identifying common themes as well as divergence. Providing state-of-the-art scholarship on deviance in modern society, this handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers and students engaged in the study of deviance across a range of disciplines including criminology, criminal justice, sociology, anthropology, and interdisciplinary departments, including justice studies, social transformation, and socio-legal studies.

Developmental Theories of Crime and Delinquency

Author: Terence Thornberry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351522396

Category: Social Science

Page: 359

View: 6249

In Developmental Theories of Crime and Delinquency, Terence P. Thornberry and his contributors show that criminal behavior is not a static human attribute, but ebbs and flows over the life course of the individual. Criminal behavior tends to follow a distinct psychological pattern. It is relatively uncommon during childhood, is initiated by most offenders during adolescence, flourishes during late adolescence and early childhood, and usually diminishes or disappears by the mid-twenties. This pattern is not characteristic of all people--some never commit crimes and others become career criminals--but it is a general description of the developmental pattern of criminal offenders. This pattern has profound implications for theories of crime and delinquency. Not only does it explain initiation into, maintenance of, and desistance from involvement in crime, it offers insight into why crime flourishes during adolescence. Traditional theories of crime and delinquency have often failed to distinguish among different phases of criminal careers. They tend to ignore developmental changes that occur across a person's life course, changes that coincide with and can explain the causes and patterns of criminal behavior. This paperback edition of the seventh volume of the distinguished series Advances in Criminological Theory moves us from static identifications of the criminal by presenting a broad range of developmental explanations of crime. Each contributor articulates a developmental or life course perspective in explaining how people become involved in delinquency and crime. Each covers a wide range of theoretical territory and reveals how a developmental perspective enhances the explanatory power of traditional theories of crime and delinquency. This volume is an invaluable tool for criminologists, sociologists, psychologists, and other professionals seeking to teach how crime and violence can be understood in our culture.

Disease and Crime

A History of Social Pathologies and the New Politics of Health

Author: Robert Peckham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113504595X

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 9884

Disease and crime are increasingly conflated in the contemporary world. News reports proclaim "epidemics" of crime, while politicians denounce terrorism as a lethal pathological threat. Recent years have even witnessed the development of a new subfield, "epidemiological criminology," which merges public health with criminal justice to provide analytical tools for criminal justice practitioners and health care professionals. Little attention, however, has been paid to the historical contexts of these disease and crime equations, or to the historical continuities and discontinuities between contemporary invocations of crime as disease and the emergence of criminology, epidemiology, and public health in the second half of the nineteenth century. When, how and why did this pathologization of crime and criminalization of disease come about? This volume addresses these critical questions, exploring the discursive construction of crime and disease across a range of geographical and historical settings.

A General Theory of Crime

Author: Michael R. Gottfredson,Travis Hirschi

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780804717731

Category: Social Science

Page: 297

View: 868

By articulating a general theory of crime and related behavior, the authors present a new and comprehensive statement of what the criminological enterprise should be about. They argue that prevalent academic criminology—whether sociological, psychological, biological, or economic—has been unable to provide believable explanations of criminal behavior. The long-discarded classical tradition in criminology was based on choice and free will, and saw crime as the natural consequence of unrestrained human tendencies to seek pleasure and to avoid pain. It concerned itself with the nature of crime and paid little attention to the criminal. The scientific, or disciplinary, tradition is based on causation and determinism, and has dominated twentieth-century criminology. It concerns itself with the nature of the criminal and pays little attention to the crime itself. Though the two traditions are considered incompatible, this book brings classical and modern criminology together by requiring that their conceptions be consistent with each other and with the results of research. The authors explore the essential nature of crime, finding that scientific and popular conceptions of crime are misleading, and they assess the truth of disciplinary claims about crime, concluding that such claims are contrary to the nature of crime and, interestingly enough, to the data produced by the disciplines themselves. They then put forward their own theory of crime, which asserts that the essential element of criminality is the absence of self-control. Persons with high self-control consider the long-term consequences of their behavior; those with low self-control do not. Such control is learned, usually early in life, and once learned, is highly resistant to change. In the remainder of the book, the authors apply their theory to the persistent problems of criminology. Why are men, adolescents, and minorities more likely than their counterparts to commit criminal acts? What is the role of the school in the causation of delinquincy? To what extent could crime be reduced by providing meaningful work? Why do some societies have much lower crime rates than others? Does white-collar crime require its own theory? Is there such a thing as organized crime? In all cases, the theory forces fundamental reconsideration of the conventional wisdom of academians and crimina justic practitioners. The authors conclude by exploring the implications of the theory for the future study and control of crime.

Control Balance

Toward A General Theory Of Deviance

Author: Charles R Tittle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429980957

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 2683

A major contribution to the field of crime/deviance, this volume by noted criminologist Charles R. Tittle puts forth an integrated theory of deviance?control balance. Its central premise is that the total amount of control people are subjected to, relative to the control they can exercise, will affect the probability and type of their deviant behavior.In developing control balance, Tittle critically reviews other general theories such as anomie, Marxian conflict, social control, differential association/social learning, labelling, and routine activities and offers reasons why those theories are insufficient. Using real-world examples to illustrate his argument, he contends that deviance results from the convergence of four variables, each of which represents an interactive nexus of several inputs, including most prominently a control imbalance. The variables are predisposition, motivation, opportunity, and constraint. Control balance theory also explains six basic types of deviance, ranging from predation, defiance, and submissiveness on one end of a control ratio continuum to exploitation, plunder, and decadence on the other.Tittle conceives of control balance as a continuation, or temporary culmination, of the collective efforts of crime/deviance scholars who have gone before, presenting it as a vehicle for trying to achieve a fully adequate general theory of deviance.

Criminology

A Sociological Introduction

Author: Eamonn Carrabine,Paul Iganski,Maggy Lee

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415281676

Category: Law

Page: 428

View: 1426

Covering all the major areas of the subject, this introduction to criminology features specific topics such as the history and theory of criminology and categories of crime.

Toward a Unified Criminology

Integrating Assumptions about Crime, People and Society

Author: Robert Agnew

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814705081

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 253

View: 333

Why do people commit crimes? How do we control crime? The theories that criminologists use to answer these questions are built on a number of underlying assumptions, including those about the nature of crime, free will, human nature, and society. These assumptions have a fundamental impact on criminology: they largely determine what criminologists study, the causes they examine, the control strategies they recommend, and how they test their theories and evaluate crime-control strategies. In Toward a Unified Criminology, noted criminologist Robert Agnew provides a critical examination of these assumptions, drawing on a range of research and perspectives to argue that these assumptions are too restrictive, unduly limiting the types of "crime" that are explored, the causes that are considered, and the methods of data collection and analysis that are employed. As such, they undermine our ability to explain and control crime. Agnew then proposes an alternative set of assumptions, drawing heavily on both mainstream and critical theories of criminology, with the goal of laying the foundation for a unified criminology that is better able to explain a broader range of crimes.

New Directions in Criminological Theory

Author: Steve Hall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1843929147

Category: Social Science

Page: 354

View: 4995

Steve Hall is Professor of Criminology at the Social Futures Institute, Teesside University, UK.He is the co-author of Violent Night (Berg, 2006), his recent co-authored book Criminal Identities and Consumer Culture (Willan/Routledge, 2008) has been described as ' an important landmark in criminology' and he is also the author of Theorizing Crime and Deviance: A New Perspective (Sage, 2012).

Social Control and Self-Control Theories of Crime and Deviance

Author: L.Edward Wells

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351548492

Category: Social Science

Page: 550

View: 955

Control theories have dominated criminological theory and research since the 1969 publication of Hirschi's seminal work on the social bond. Social control and self-control theorists are unique in suggesting that patterns in criminal behaviors are better explained by variations in social constraints rather than by individual motivational impulses, thus indicating that their main concerns are the explication and clarification of the techniques, processes, and institutions of informal social control. The four major sections of this volume focus on: the similarities and differences among the major contributors to the early developmental stage of social control theory; the central importance of parents, peers, and schools in the creation of informal control mechanisms and their link to crime and delinquency; the theoretical underpinnings of self-control theory, including empirical tests and criticisms; and theoretical integrations of social control and self-control theories with various motivational theories of crime and delinquency.

An introduction to critical criminology

Author: Ugwudike, Pamela

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447309618

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 8276

Critical criminological theories and perspectives are typically major components of Criminology degree courses. An Introduction to Critical Criminology is the first accessible text on these topics for students of criminology, sociology and social policy. Written by an experienced lecturer who specialises in the topic, it offers an in-depth but accessible introduction to foundational and contemporary theories and perspectives in critical criminology. In doing so, it introduces students to theories and perspectives that challenge mainstream criminological theories about the causes of crime, and the operation of the criminal justice system. With the inclusion of boxed examples, key points and sample essay questions An Introduction to Critical Criminology is ideal for students of Criminology because it explores in detail a vast array of critical criminological theories and perspectives.