The Plagiarist in the Kitchen

Author: Jonathan Meades

Publisher: Unbound Publishing

ISBN: 1783522410

Category: Cooking

Page: 176

View: 9640

‘I adore Meades’s book . . . I want more of his rule-breaking irreverence in my kitchen.’ New York Times ‘The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is hilariously grumpy, muttering at us “Don’t you bastards know anything?” You can read it purely for literary pleasure, but Jonathan Meades makes everything sound so delicious that the non-cook will be moved to cook and the bad cook will cook better.’ David Hare, Guardian The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is an anti-cookbook. Best known as a provocative novelist, journalist and film-maker, Jonathan Meades has also been called ‘the best amateur chef in the world’ by Marco Pierre White. His contention here is that anyone who claims to have invented a dish is delusional, dishonestly contributing to the myth of culinary originality. Meades delivers a polemical but highly usable collection of 125 of his favourite recipes, each one an example of the fine art of culinary plagiarism. These are dishes and methods he has hijacked, adapted, improved upon and made his own. Without assuming any special knowledge or skill, the book is full of excellent advice. He tells us why the British never got the hang of garlic. That a purist would never dream of putting cheese in a Gratin Dauphinois. That cooking brains in brown butter cannot be improved upon. And why – despite the advice of Martin Scorsese’s mother – he insists on frying his meatballs. Adorned with his own abstract monochrome images (none of which ‘illustrate’ the stolen recipes they accompany), The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is a stylish object, both useful and instructive. In a world dominated by health fads, food vloggers and over-priced kitchen gadgets, it is timely reminder that, when it comes to food, it’s almost always better to borrow than to invent.

The Plagiarist in the Kitchen

Author: Jonathan Meades

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781783522408

Category: Cookbooks

Page: 176

View: 2868

Best known as a provocative novelist, journalist, and filmmaker, Jonathan Meades has also been called "the best amateur chef in the world" by Marco Pierre White. His contention here is that anyone who claims to have invented a dish is delusional, dishonestly contributing to the myth of culinary originality. Meades delivers a polemical but highly usable collection of 125 of his favorite recipes, each one an example of the fine art of culinary plagiarism. These are dishes and methods he has hijacked, adapted, improved upon, and made his own. He tells us why the British never got the hang of garlic. That a purist would never dream of putting cheese in a Gratin Dauphinois. That cooking brains in brown butter cannot be improved upon. And why--despite the advice of Martin Scorsese's mother--he insists on frying his meatballs. Adorned with his own abstract monochrome images (none of which "illustrate" the stolen recipes they accompany), The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is a stylish object, both useful and instructive. Includes metric measues.

Museum Without Walls

Author: Jonathan Meades

Publisher: Unbound Publishing

ISBN: 190871719X

Category: Architecture

Page: 464

View: 1506

Jonathan Meades has an obsessive preoccupation with places. He has spent thirty sales & marketing years constructing sixty films, two novels and hundreds of pieces of journalism that explore an extraordinary range of them, from natural landscapes to man-made buildings and 'the gaps between them', drawing attention to what he calls 'the rich oddness of what we take for granted'. This book collects 54 pieces and six film scripts that dissolve the barriers between high and low culture, good and bad taste, deep seriousness and black comedy. Meades delivers what he calls 'heavy entertainment' – strong opinions backed up by an astonishing depth of knowledge. To read Meades on places, buildings, politics, or cultural history is an exhilarating workout for the mind. He leaves you better informed, more alert, less gullible.

Pompey

A Novel

Author: Jonathan Meades

Publisher: Unbound Publishing

ISBN: 1783520213

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 5539

At first glance, Jonathan Meades's 1993 masterpiece Pompey is a post-war family saga set in and around the city of Portsmouth. This doesn't come close to communicating the scabrous magnificence of Meades's vision. He writes like Martin Amis on acid, creating an obscene, suppurating vision of an England in terminal decline. The story begins with Guy Vallender, a fireworks manufacturer from Portsmouth (Pompey), who has four children by different four different women. There's Poor Eddie, a feeble geek with a gift for healing; 'Mad Bantu', the son of a black prostitute, who was hopelessly damaged in the womb by an attempted abortion; Bonnie, who is born beautiful but becomes a junkie and a porn star; and finally Jean-Marie, a leather-wearing gay gerontophiliac conceived on a one-night stand in Belgium. The narrator is 'Jonathan Meades', cousin to Poor Eddie and Bonnie, who tells the story of how their strange and poisonous destinies intersect. And although there is no richer stew of perversity, voyeurism, corruption, religious extremism and curdled celebrity in all of English literature, there is also an underlying compassion and a jet-black humour which makes Pompey an important and strangely satisfying work of art. Prepare to enter the English novel's darkest ride....

The Pedant in the Kitchen

Author: Julian Barnes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781782390947

Category: Cooking

Page: 160

View: 8687

This work is an elegant account of Julian Barnes' search for gastronomic precision. It is a quest that leaves him seduced by Jane Grigson, infuriated by Nigel Slater and reassured by Mrs Beeton's Victorian virtues. For anyone who has ever been defeated by a cookbook.

Balancing Acts

Behind the Scenes at London's National Theatre

Author: Nicholas Hytner

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0451493419

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 4056

From the Tony Award and Laurence Olivier Award-winning former director of London's National Theatre--this is a fascinating, candid, eloquent memoir about his career directing theater, producing films and opera, and working closely with some of the world's most celebrated actors. The list of Nicholas Hytner's accomplishments is long and distinguished: as Artistic Director of London's National Theatre from 2003-2015, he directed and produced a great number of their most popular and memorable plays and musicals, many of which have come to Broadway: Carousel, Richard Bean's One Man, Two Guvnors, David Hare's Stuff Happens among them. He directed both the London and Broadway productions of Miss Saigon, each of which ran for ten years. He directed Alan Bennett's The Madness of George III on both stage and screen. In short: He is one of today's most successful and admired theatrical impresarios. In Balancing Acts, Hytner gives us a detailed behind-the-scenes look at his creative process. From reviving classic musicals and mastering Shakespeare to commissioning new plays, he shows theater making to be a necessarily collaborative exercise, and he writes insightfully about the actors and playwrights he's worked with: Derek Jacobi, Richard Griffiths, Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Harold Pinter, and Tom Stoppard among them. With a cultural range that spans from The Mikado to The Lady in the Van, Balancing Acts is not only a memoir but a gathering of illuminating notes on the art of directing and a thoughtful meditation on the purpose of theater.

The Little Book of Plagiarism

Author: Richard A. Posner

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 0307496538

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 848

A concise, lively, and bracing exploration of an issue bedeviling our cultural landscape–plagiarism in literature, academia, music, art, and film–by one of our most influential and controversial legal scholars. Best-selling novelists J. K. Rowling and Dan Brown, popular historians Doris Kearns Goodwin and Stephen Ambrose, Harvard law professor Charles Ogletree, first novelist Kaavya Viswanathan: all have rightly or wrongly been accused of plagiarism–theft of intellectual property–provoking widespread media punditry. But what exactly is plagiarism? How has the meaning of this notoriously ambiguous term changed over time as a consequence of historical and cultural transformations? Is the practice on the rise, or just more easily detectable by technological advances? How does the current market for expressive goods inform our own understanding of plagiarism? Is there really such a thing as “cryptomnesia,” the unconscious, unintentional appropriation of another’s work? What are the mysterious motives and curious excuses of plagiarists? What forms of punishment and absolution does this “sin” elicit? What is the good in certain types of plagiarism? Provocative, insightful, and extraordinary for its clarity and forthrightness, The Little Book of Plagiarism is an analytical tour de force in small, the work of “one of the top twenty legal thinkers in America” (Legal Affairs), a distinguished jurist renowned for his adventuresome intellect and daring iconoclasm. From the Hardcover edition.

You Aren't What You Eat

Fed Up with Gastroculture

Author: Steven Poole

Publisher: Signal

ISBN: 0771069030

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 4821

We have become obsessed by food: where it comes from, where to buy it, how to cook it and—most absurdly of all—how to eat it. Our televisions and newspapers are filled with celebrity chefs, latter-day priests whose authority and ambition range from the small scale (what we should have for supper) to large-scale public schemes designed to improve our communal eating habits. When did the basic human imperative to feed ourselves mutate into such a multitude of anxieties about provenance, ethics, health, lifestyle and class status? And since when did the likes of Jamie Oliver and Nigella Lawson gain the power to transform our kitchens and dining tables into places where we expect to be spiritually sustained? In this subtle and erudite polemic, Steven Poole argues that we're trying to fill more than just our bellies when we pick up our knives and forks, and that we might be a lot happier if we realised that sometimes we should throw away the colour supplements and open a tin of beans.

Bechamp Or Pasteur?

Author: Ethel D. Hume

Publisher: the Philovox

ISBN: 0980297605

Category: Medical

Page: 352

View: 7423

This volume contains new editions of two books which have been available only sporadically in the decades since their publication. R.Pearson's "Pasteur: Plagiarist, Imposter" was originally published in 1942, and is a succinct introduction to both Louis Pasteur and Antoine Bechamp, and the reasons behind the troubled relationship that they shared for their entire working lives. Whereas Pearson's work is a valuable introduction to an often complex topic, it is Ethel Douglas Hume's expansive and well-documented "Bechamp or Pasteur? A Lost Chapter in the History of Biology" which provides the main body of evidence. It covers the main points of contention between Bechamp and Pasteur in depth sufficient to satisfy any degree of scientific or historical scrutiny, and it contains, wherever possible, detailed references to the source material and supporting evidence. Virtually no claim in Ms Hume's book is undocumented. The reader will soon discern that neither Mr Pearson nor Ms Hume could ever be called fans of Pasteur or his 'science'. They both declare their intentions openly; that they wish to contribute to the undoing of a massive medical and scientific fraud. "Nothing is lost, nothing is created ... all is transformed. Nothing is the prey of death. All is the prey of life." -- Antoine Bechamp This is a new edition of this title. The text has been extensively re-edited for today's reader.

Filthy English

Author: Jonathan Meades

Publisher: Fourth Estate

ISBN: 9780007156436

Category: Black humor

Page: 160

View: 3769

These short stories mark the start of a brilliant and black literary career. A dog who stars in bestial pornographic movies describes the slippery slope towards aniseed addiction in 'Fur and Skin'. 'The Sylvan Life' is a story of rustling, hallucinogenic mushrooms and incest as they proliferate in the New Forest. In 'Spring and Fall' a rich and childless woman offers a sybaritic young boy a clandestine family life which becomes his downfall. The most extraordinary circumstances combine to provide the perfect alibi for a homosexual 'crime passionnel' in 'Oh So Bent', 'The Brute's Price' demonstrates the inadvertent steps an innocent man may take in bringing himself under suspicion of heinous murders on Portland. An injection of the criminal element into the pretensions of suburban Surrey provides the squalid drama of 'Rhododendron Gulch'. In the title story a relentlessly pedantic urge of a lexicographer to discover why his surname is a slang word for 'foot' leads him to a nightmarish revelation. Jonathan Meades has a black imagination. Not content with disarming his readers an outrageous premise, he continues to tease their curiosity from one end of each story to the other. His is

The Cottage Kitchen

Cozy Cooking in the English Countryside

Author: Marte Marie Forsberg

Publisher: Clarkson Potter

ISBN: 0451495772

Category: Cooking

Page: 288

View: 6137

Share in a gorgeous, thoughtful life in the charming English countryside with The Cottage Kitchen, a cookbook of recipes and stories by Norwegian-born photographer and tastemaker Marie Forsberg.

The Plagiarist

A Novel

Author: Benjamin Cheever

Publisher: Scribner Book Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 322

View: 3954

Arthur Prentice, the son of an aging, alcoholic, much-celebrated American author, embarks on a career with a prestigious magazine and finds himself undertaking an emotional journey that transforms every facet of his life. "An ingenious first novel".--Newsweek.

Negroland

A Memoir

Author: Margo Jefferson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307473430

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 1334

"A New York times notable book"--Back cover.

The WI Cookbook

The First 100 Years

Author: Mary Gwynn

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473527643

Category: Cooking

Page: 224

View: 8221

As the Women's Institute turns 100, this beautifully packaged book, curated by food journalist Mary Gwynn, brings together the 100 best loved members' recipes nationwide. Organised decade by decade, and setting each recipe in its historical and social context, it spans everything from jams and preserves to main courses, puddings and bakes. Nostalgic favourites like Toad in the Hole and Kedgeree feature alongside contemporary hits such as Lamb Pot Roast with Nettle Champ and Italian Lamb with Roasted Sweet Peppers. Here are recipes created during the war to make the most of limited supplies (like Stuffed Cod Steak and Apple and Fig Roll) and ideas to overcome the challenges of food rationing (like Elderberry and Apple Jelly and Corned Beef Hash) to current day recipes such as Venison Steaks with Quick Bearnaise Sauce and finally the WI's own signature cake: The Centenary Fruit Cake from North Yorkshire. Fully illustrated from the archives of the WI, alongside beautiful food photography, this gorgeous cookbook will prove a firm favourite with keen cooks of all ages.

Words for the Taking

The Hunt for a Plagiarist

Author: Neal Bowers

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809327867

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 161

View: 1988

In January 1992, poet Neal Bowers received a phone call that changed his life. He learned his poems had been stolen and published under another name. Bowers hired a copyright lawyer and a private detective, and they began the agonizing hunt to track down the person who stole his creative work. Bowers was dealing with more than the theft of words. He uncovered the plagiarist’s unsavory past when he found convicted child molester David Jones, who published the poems using the name David Sumner. Determined to hold the plagiarist accountable, Bowers is drawn into a bizarre game of catch-me-if-you-can. His odyssey introduces him to the legal system and a sympathetic female detective, reveals the reactions of fellow poets, and provokes a flood of nationwide publicity and a deluge of letters from strangers interested in the case. Letters from Bowers’s attorney to Jones and phone conversations between the two produce unsatisfactory results. In the end, the plagiarist is not punished, and Bowers deals with the loss of friends, derision from his colleagues, and trouble in his marriage. Words for the Taking: The Hunt for a Plagiarist, first published in 1997, is as much a commentary on our cultural view of plagiarism as it is a real-life detective story. Bowers’s wry and disturbing account of being the victim of a serial plagiarist offers unexpected twists and startling revelations. This updated edition presents a final consideration of the bizarre case and remains the only book to offer a personal account of the effects of plagiarism. Ten years after the original publication, Neal Bowers finds his life as a writer altered in ways he could never have foreseen. His responses to the series of events show his vulnerability as an artist and his adjustment to being a victim. In a new chapter, Bowers describes his renewed quest in 2006 for a resolution and explains why he chose to give up writing poetry. This beautifully written case study about the discovery and attempted resolution of an intellectual crime will appeal to academicians and general readers alike who care about language, the state of poetry, and intellectual property in contemporary America.

Spice Trip

The Simple Way to Make Food Exciting

Author: Emma Grazette,Stevie Parle

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448156823

Category: Cooking

Page: 304

View: 8634

Stevie Parle and Emma Grazette are on a mission to spice up Britain's kitchens and revolutionise the way we cook with the treasures hidden away in our cupboards. This book, accompanying the award-winning Channel 4 series, will show just how to bring the magic of spice into your home. Emma and Stevie have been on a journey to all corners of the world to discover the secrets of six essential everyday spices, learning from the world's experts - the people who grow and cook with them every day. In this book they share the best recipes, therapies and mementoes from their journey. Their recipes are inspired not just by the countries visited on this trip, but from all over the world. Some are hot, some sweet, some subtle, and they're all special, take less than twenty minutes to prepare and are really easy to cook. And as well as exploring the culinary uses of each spice, Emma also reveals their therapeutic value through the secrets she discovered from the remarkable people she met on her journey. With over 100 thoroughly tested recipes, therapies and photography from an incredible journey, let Spice Trip transform your cooking and your life from the ordinary to the extraordinary.

Standing in the Shadow of Giants

Plagiarists, Authors, Collaborators

Author: Rebecca Moore Howard

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781567504361

Category: Education

Page: 195

View: 481

Surveys changes and conflicts in Western theories of authorship and presents an account of how and why plagiarism became important to academic culture.

Stolen words

Author: Thomas Mallon

Publisher: Harvest Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 2306

Presents a history of plagiarism, focusing on the motivations, consequences, and reverberations of this practice in publishing, academia, and Hollywood.

The Chili Cookbook

From Three-Bean to Four-Alarm, Con Carne to Vegetarian, Cookoff-Worthy Recipes for the One-Pot Classic

Author: Robb Walsh

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1607747952

Category: Cooking

Page: 200

View: 5938

A cookbook devoted to the family friendly, tailgate party classic--featuring more than 60 tried-and-true recipes--from veteran cookbook author and Americana expert Robb Walsh. Chili is one of the most "all-American" foods around. It is universally loved and perfect for nearly every occasion--a church potluck, sports- or TV-viewing party, casual dinner with the family, or late-night dorm room snack. Despite the evergreen popularity of chili, there are surprisingly few books on the subject. Enter The Chili Cookbook, written by veteran author and Tex-Mex sage Robb Walsh. With its impeccable recipes, fascinating and unexpected historical anecdotes, affordable price, and whimsical package, The Chili Cookbook is sure to become an instant classic.