The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly

A Physician's First Year

Author: Matt McCarthy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0804138672

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 3881

"This funny, candid memoir about the author's intern year at a New York hospital provides a scorchingly frank look at how doctors are made, taking readers into the critical care unit to see one burgeoning physician's journey from ineptitude to competence. After his professional baseball career failed to launch, Matt McCarthy went to Harvard Medical School and on to a coveted residency slot in New York. But when he almost lost a patient on his first day after making what he believed to be a terrible error, he found himself facing the harsh reality of a new doctor's life--one in which even overachievers find themselves humbled, and in which med school training has little to offer in navigating the emotional rollercoaster of dealing with actual patients. Luckily for McCarthy, his second-year-resident adviser (whom he calls "Baio," owing to a resemblance to a Charles in Charge-era Scott Baio) was an offbeat genius, with a knack for breaking down the complicated process of treating patients. But neither doctor could offer much help to a patient named Barney, who had been living in the hospital while waiting for a new heart, and whom McCarthy slowly befriended over the course of the year in ways that changed his perception of what it means to be a physician. Mixing the tense drama of ER with the screwball humor of Scrubs, McCarthy offers a window on to hospital life that dispenses with sanctimony and self-seriousness while emphasizing the black-comic paradox of becoming a doctor: How do you learn how to save lives in a job where there is no practice? This "One L for doctors" will inspire and entertain physicians and patients alike"--

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly

A Physician's First Year

Author: Matt McCarthy

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0804138664

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 1984

In medical school, Matt McCarthy dreamed of being a different kind of doctor—the sort of mythical, unflappable physician who could reach unreachable patients. But when a new admission to the critical care unit almost died his first night on call, he found himself scrambling. Visions of mastery quickly gave way to hopes of simply surviving hospital life, where confidence was hard to come by and no amount of med school training could dispel the terror of facing actual patients. This funny, candid memoir of McCarthy’s intern year at a New York hospital provides a scorchingly frank look at how doctors are made, taking readers into patients’ rooms and doctors’ conferences to witness a physician's journey from ineptitude to competence. McCarthy's one stroke of luck paired him with a brilliant second-year adviser he called “Baio” (owing to his resemblance to the Charles in Charge star), who proved to be a remarkable teacher with a wicked sense of humor. McCarthy would learn even more from the people he cared for, including a man named Benny, who was living in the hospital for months at a time awaiting a heart transplant. But no teacher could help McCarthy when an accident put his own health at risk, and showed him all too painfully the thin line between doctor and patient. The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly offers a window on to hospital life that dispenses with sanctimony and self-seriousness while emphasizing the black-comic paradox of becoming a doctor: How do you learn to save lives in a job where there is no practice? From the Hardcover edition.

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly

A Physician's First Year

Author: Matt McCarthy

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 9780804138659

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 1405

"This funny, candid memoir about the author's intern year at a New York hospital provides a scorchingly frank look at how doctors are made, taking readers into the critical care unit to see one burgeoning physician's journey from ineptitude to competence. After his professional baseball career failed to launch, Matt McCarthy went to Harvard Medical School and on to a coveted residency slot in New York. But when he almost lost a patient on his first day after making what he believed to be a terrible error, he found himself facing the harsh reality of a new doctor's life--one in which even overachievers find themselves humbled, and in which med school training has little to offer in navigating the emotional rollercoaster of dealing with actual patients. Luckily for McCarthy, his second-year-resident adviser (whom he calls "Baio," owing to a resemblance to a Charles in Charge-era Scott Baio) was an offbeat genius, with a knack for breaking down the complicated process of treating patients. But neither doctor could offer much help to a patient named Barney, who had been living in the hospital while waiting for a new heart, and whom McCarthy slowly befriended over the course of the year in ways that changed his perception of what it means to be a physician. Mixing the tense drama of ER with the screwball humor of Scrubs, McCarthy offers a window on to hospital life that dispenses with sanctimony and self-seriousness while emphasizing the black-comic paradox of becoming a doctor: How do you learn how to save lives in a job where there is no practice? This "One L for doctors" will inspire and entertain physicians and patients alike"--

Odd Man Out

A Year on the Mound with a Minor League Misfit

Author: Matt McCarthy

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101015934

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 304

View: 9991

"The best baseball book since Moneyball." Hailed by critics as one of the great books about baseball, Odd Man Out captures the gritty essence of our national pastime as it is played outside the spot­light. Matt McCarthy, a decent left-handed starting pitcher on one of the worst squads in Yale history, earned a ticket to spring training as the twenty-sixth-round draft pick of the 2002 Anaheim Angels. This is the hilarious inside story of his year with the Provo Angels, Anaheim's minor league affiliate in the heart of Mormon country, as McCarthy navigates the ups and downs of an antic, grueling season, filled with cross-country bus trips, bizarre rivalries, and wild locker-room hijinks.

Emergency!:

True Stories from the Nation's ERs

Author: Mark Brown, MD

Publisher: Villard

ISBN: 0307829596

Category: Medical

Page: 320

View: 5709

Long before the hit TV show E.R., emergency room doctor Mark Brown decided that the world just had to know about real life in a hospital's E.R. He canvassed 15,000 doctors and nurses across the country, asking them to contribute the stories, dramas, the ridiculous sagas, and the immensely humorous moments that make up their lives in the war zone, or "pit."

What Patients Taught Me

A Medical Student's Journey

Author: Audrey Young

Publisher: Sasquatch Books

ISBN: 1570616582

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 9549

Do sleek high-tech hospitals teach more about medicine and less about humanity? Do doctors ever lose their tolerance for suffering? With sensitive observation and graceful prose, this book explores some of the difficult and deeply personal questions a 23-year-old doctor confronts with her very first dying patient, and continues to struggle with as she strives to become a good doctor. In her travels, the doctor attends to terminal illness, AIDS, tuberculosis, and premature birth in small rural communities throughout the world.

The Lost Art of Healing

Author: Bernard Lown

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0345425979

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 344

View: 7602

The author draws on his forty years of experience as a physician to call for a new appreciation of the importance of the doctor-patient relationship and of the art rather than the technology of medicine

Every Patient Tells a Story

Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis

Author: Lisa Sanders

Publisher: Harmony

ISBN: 0767922476

Category: Medical

Page: 276

View: 2695

A Yale School of Medicine physician, columnist for "Diagnosis," and technical advisor for the television show House shares the experiences of doctors facing complex medical mysteries in order to illustrate the art and science of diagnosis. Reprint. A New York Times extended-list bestseller.

The Roots of Ayurveda

Selections from Sanskrit Medical Writings

Author: D. Wujastyk

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780140448245

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 361

View: 5164

The author presents an illuminating translation of ancient texts that reveal the origins of yoga, homeopathy, and holistic medicine.

The Man Who Broke Out of the Bank and Went for a Walk across France

Author: Miles Morland

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408863642

Category: Travel

Page: 272

View: 7355

At the age of 45 Miles Morland resigned from his highly paid job as head of the UK division of a major American bank and went for a walk with his wife in France. Neither of them was used to walking further than the distance between a restaurant and a waiting taxi. They walked from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic, 350 miles through the foothills of the Pyrenees, staying in small country inns and occasionally sleeping out along the way. The author describes the pleasures and agonies of the walk and reflects frequently and with relief on the life from which he has escaped. The pressures of his former life had affected him in many ways, the repercussions including divorce and then remarriage to his former wife Guislaine.

What Doctors Feel

How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine

Author: Danielle Ofri

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807073334

Category: Medical

Page: 232

View: 8213

A look at the emotional side of medicine—the shame, fear, anger, anxiety, empathy, and even love that affect patient care Physicians are assumed to be objective, rational beings, easily able to detach as they guide patients and families through some of life’s most challenging moments. But doctors’ emotional responses to the life-and-death dramas of everyday practice have a profound impact on medical care. And while much has been written about the minds and methods of the medical professionals who save our lives, precious little has been said about their emotions. In What Doctors Feel, Dr. Danielle Ofri has taken on the task of dissecting the hidden emotional responses of doctors, and how these directly influence patients. How do the stresses of medical life—from paperwork to grueling hours to lawsuits to facing death—affect the medical care that doctors can offer their patients? Digging deep into the lives of doctors, Ofri examines the daunting range of emotions—shame, anger, empathy, frustration, hope, pride, occasionally despair, and sometimes even love—that permeate the contemporary doctor-patient connection. Drawing on scientific studies, including some surprising research, Dr. Danielle Ofri offers up an unflinching look at the impact of emotions on health care. With her renowned eye for dramatic detail, Dr. Ofri takes us into the swirling heart of patient care, telling stories of caregivers caught up and occasionally torn down by the whirlwind life of doctoring. She admits to the humiliation of an error that nearly killed one of her patients and her forever fear of making another. She mourns when a beloved patient is denied a heart transplant. She tells the riveting stories of an intern traumatized when she is forced to let a newborn die in her arms, and of a doctor whose daily glass of wine to handle the frustrations of the ER escalates into a destructive addiction. But doctors don’t only feel fear, grief, and frustration. Ofri also reveals that doctors tell bad jokes about “toxic sock syndrome,” cope through gallows humor, find hope in impossible situations, and surrender to ecstatic happiness when they triumph over illness. The stories here reveal the undeniable truth that emotions have a distinct effect on how doctors care for their patients. For both clinicians and patients, understanding what doctors feel can make all the difference in giving and getting the best medical care.

The Father of All Things

A Marine, His Son, and the Legacy of Vietnam

Author: Tom Bissell

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307523616

Category: Travel

Page: 432

View: 443

The Father of All Things is a riveting, haunting, and often hilarious account of a veteran and his son’s journey through Vietnam. As his father recounts his experiences as a soldier, including a near fatal injury, Tom Bissell weaves a larger history of the war and explores the controversies that still spark furious debate today. Blending history, memoir, and travelogue, The Father of All Things is a portrait of the war’s personal, political, and cultural impact from the perspective of the generation that grew up in the wake of the conflict. It is also a wise and revelatory book about the bond between fathers and sons. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Doctor Will See You Now

Author: Max Pemberton

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

ISBN: 1848946902

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 893

The junior doctor . . . back on the wards. After a year on the streets treating outreach patients, Max Pemberton is back in the relative comfort of hospital. This time running between elderly care and the dementia clinic to A&E and outpatients. No longer inexperienced (Max and his doctor friends can now tell when someone is actually dead), they are on the front line of patient care for better or worse. In the midst of an NHS still under threat (some things never change) there are committed and caring doctors, big issues, hope, frustration, huge societal changes affecting the entire health system as well as the general drama of everyday life in a big hospital, from biscuit wars to resus. It's not like television, this is real - there are no easy answers - but The Doctor Will See You Now will give you hope that there are enough good doctors asking the questions.

Dopesick

Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America

Author: Beth Macy

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316551287

Category: Psychology

Page: 384

View: 2642

The only book to fully chart the devastating opioid crisis in America: An unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines, from a New York Times bestselling author and journalist who has lived through it. In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of America's twenty-plus year struggle with opioid addiction. From distressed small communities in Central Appalachia to wealthy suburbs; from disparate cities to once-idyllic farm towns; it's a heartbreaking trajectory that illustrates how this national crisis has persisted for so long and become so firmly entrenched. Beginning with a single dealer who lands in a small Virginia town and sets about turning high school football stars into heroin overdose statistics, Macy endeavors to answer a grieving mother's question-why her only son died-and comes away with a harrowing story of greed and need. From the introduction of OxyContin in 1996, Macy parses how America embraced a medical culture where overtreatment with painkillers became the norm. In some of the same distressed communities featured in her bestselling book Factory Man, the unemployed use painkillers both to numb the pain of joblessness and pay their bills, while privileged teens trade pills in cul-de-sacs, and even high school standouts fall prey to prostitution, jail, and death. Through unsparing, yet deeply human portraits of the families and first responders struggling to ameliorate this epidemic, each facet of the crisis comes into focus. In these politically fragmented times, Beth Macy shows, astonishingly, that the only thing that unites Americans across geographic and class lines is opioid drug abuse. But in a country unable to provide basic healthcare for all, Macy still finds reason to hope-and signs of the spirit and tenacity necessary in those facing addiction to build a better future for themselves and their families. "Everyone should read Beth Macy's story of the American opioid epidemic" -- Professor Anne C Case, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University and Sir Angus Deaton, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics

The Intern Blues

The Timeless Classic About the Making of a Doctor

Author: Robert Marion

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062243187

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 528

View: 7239

While supervising a small group of interns at a major New York medical center, Dr. Robert Marion asked three of them to keep a careful diary over the course of a year. Andy, Mark, and Amy vividly describe their real-life lessons in treating very sick children; confronting child abuse and the awful human impact of the AIDS epidemic; skirting the indifference of the hospital bureaucracy; and overcoming their own fears, insecurities, and constant fatigue. Their stories are harrowing and often funny; their personal triumph is unforgettable. This updated edition of The Intern Blues includes a new preface from the author discussing the status of medical training in America today and a new afterword updating the reader on the lives of the three young interns who first shared their stories with readers more than a decade ago.

Greetings from Bury Park

Author: Sarfraz Manzoor

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307495779

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 7962

Sarfraz Manzoor was two years old when, in 1974, he emigrated from Pakistan to Britain with his mother, brother, and sister. Sarfraz spent his teenage years in a constant battle, trying to reconcile being both British and Muslim, trying to fit in at school and at home. But it was when his best friend introduced him to the music of Bruce Springsteen that his life changed completely. From the age of sixteen on, after the moment he heard the harmonica and opening lines to “The River,” Springsteen became his personal muse, a lens through which he was able to view the rest of his life. Both a tribute to Springsteen and a story of personal discovery, Greetings from Bury Park is a warm, irreverent, and exceptionally perceptive memoir about how music transcends religion and race. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Intern

A Doctor's Initiation

Author: Sandeep Jauhar

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429939539

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 6964

Intern is Sandeep Jauhar's story of his days and nights in residency at a busy hospital in New York City, a trial that led him to question our every assumption about medical care today. Residency—and especially the first year, called internship—is legendary for its brutality. Working eighty hours or more per week, most new doctors spend their first year asking themselves why they wanted to be doctors in the first place. Jauhar's internship was even more harrowing than most: he switched from physics to medicine in order to follow a more humane calling—only to find that medicine put patients' concerns last. He struggled to find a place among squadrons of cocky residents and doctors. He challenged the practices of the internship in The New York Times, attracting the suspicions of the medical bureaucracy. Then, suddenly stricken, he became a patient himself—and came to see that today's high-tech, high-pressure medicine can be a humane science after all. Now a thriving cardiologist, Jauhar has all the qualities you'd want in your own doctor: expertise, insight, a feel for the human factor, a sense of humor, and a keen awareness of the worries that we all have in common. His beautifully written memoir explains the inner workings of modern medicine with rare candor and insight.

Twelve Patients

Life and Death at Bellevue Hospital

Author: Eric Manheimer

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 1455503894

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 5098

The inspiration for the NBC drama New Amsterdam and in the spirit of Oliver Sacks, this intensely involving memoir from a medical director of a major NYC hospital looks poignantly at patients' lives and reveals the author's own battle with cancer. Using the plights of twelve very different patients--from dignitaries at the nearby UN, to supermax prisoners at Riker's Island, to illegal immigrants, and Wall Street tycoons--Dr. Eric Manheimer "offers far more than remarkable medical dramas: he blends each patient's personal experiences with their social implications" (Publishers Weekly). Manheimer is not only the medical director of the country's oldest public hospital, but he is also a patient. As the book unfolds, the narrator is diagnosed with cancer, and he is forced to wrestle with the end of his own life even as he struggles to save the lives of others.

This is Going to Hurt

Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor

Author: Adam Kay

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509858644

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 267

View: 3937

‘Painfully funny. The pain and the funniness somehow add up to something entirely good, entirely noble and entirely loveable.' - Stephen Fry The Sunday Times Number One Bestseller and Humour Book of the Year Winner of the Books Are My Bag Book of the Year Winner of iBooks' Book of the Year Welcome to the life of a junior doctor: 97-hour weeks, life and death decisions, a constant tsunami of bodily fluids, and the hospital parking meter earns more than you. Scribbled in secret after endless days, sleepless nights and missed weekends, Adam Kay's This is Going to Hurt provides a no-holds-barred account of his time on the NHS front line. Hilarious, horrifying and heartbreaking, this diary is everything you wanted to know – and more than a few things you didn't – about life on and off the hospital ward. As seen on ITV's Zoe Ball Book Club This edition includes extra diary entries and a new afterword by the author.

Black Man in a White Coat

A Doctor's Reflections on Race and Medicine

Author: Damon Tweedy

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250044634

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 8111

"When Damon Tweedy first enters the halls of Duke University Medical School on a full scholarship, he envisions a bright future where his segregated, working class background will become largely irrelevant. Instead, he finds that he has joined a new world where race is front and center. When one of his first professors mistakes him for a maintenance worker, it is a moment that crystallizes the challenges he will face throughout his early career. Making matters worse, in lecture after lecture the common refrain for numerous diseases resounds: "more common in blacks than whites." [This book] examines the complex ways in which both black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine"--