The Scopes Trial

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Jeffrey P. Moran

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312294267

Category: Education

Page: 230

View: 7109

Uses previously unpublished documents to provide an introduction to the 1925 Scopes trial, the landmark case about teaching evolution in the classroom.

American Genesis

The Evolution Controversies from Scopes to Creation Science

Author: Jeffrey P. Moran

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019991348X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9621

The question of teaching evolution in the public schools is a continuing and frequently heated political issue in America. From Tennessee's Scopes Trial in 1925 to recent battles that have erupted in Louisiana, Kansas, Ohio, and countless other localities, the critics and supporters of evolution have fought nonstop over the role of science and religion in American public life. In American Genesis, Jeffrey P. Moran explores the ways in which the evolution debate has reverberated beyond the confines of state legislatures and courthouses. Using extensive research in newspapers, periodicals, and archives, Moran shows that social forces such as gender, regionalism, and race have intersected with the debate over evolution in ways that shed light on modern American culture. He investigates, for instance, how antievolutionism deepened the cultural divisions between North and South--northerners embraced evolution as a sign of sectional enlightenment, while southerners defined themselves as the standard bearers of true Christianity. Evolution debates also exposed a deep gulf between conservative Black Christians and secular intellectuals such as W. E. B. DuBois. Moran also explores the ways in which the struggle has played out in the universities, on the internet, and even within the evangelical community. Throughout, he shows that evolution has served as a weapon, as an enforcer of identity, and as a polarizing force both within and without the churches. America has both the most advanced scientific infrastructure as well as the highest rate of church adherence among developed nations, and the issues raised in the evolution controversies touch the heart of our national identity. American Genesis makes an important contribution to our understanding of the impact of this contentious issue, revealing how its tendrils have stretched out to touch virtually every corner of our lives.

The Triangle Fire

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Jo Ann Argersinger

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319049958

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 2757

This new edition reflects and reinforces the continuing popular interest in the Triangle Fire of 1911. The Introduction provides critical context by exploring the demands industrialization placed upon urban working women, their fight to unionize, and the fire’s significance in the greater scope of labor reform. By adding new sources that elevate the voices of immigrant women workers as they organized to gain better working and living conditions, Jo Ann E. Argersinger challenges students to analyze the important political and economic roles held by these "factory girls." The diversity of sources helps to engage students as they explore the impact of a major event in a significant era of American history. Several pedagogical tools are also included to aid students’ understanding and analysis: headnotes preceding each document offer critical historical context; a chronology of the strike and fire is provided for historical reference; questions for consideration are designed to stimulate deeper analysis; and a bibliography with suggested sources and a list of relevant Web sites encourage further exploration of the topic.

Monkey Business

The True Story of the Scopes Trial

Author: Marvin N. Olasky,John Perry

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780805431575

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 3829

Describes the famous 1925 courtroom showdown of William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow over the teaching of evolution in public schools, and points out details and discrepancies that have not come to light until recently.

The Sacco and Vanzetti Case

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Michael M. Topp

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781403968081

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 1200

In 1920 Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, two Italian immigrants and devout anarchists, were accused of robbery and murder. Their subsequent trial and execution captivated the world and exposed many of the cultural and political tensions of 1920s America. Sacco and Vanzetti's supporters claimed the two anarchists had been persecuted for their beliefs and not their actions, while their detractors saw proof of the country's ability to protect itself from dangerous foreign elements. Michael M. Topp's unique collection of documents examines both sides and provides a clear presentation of the trial while emphasizing the broad historical context in which it was conducted. An interpretive introductory essay, document headnotes, a chronology, and questions for consideration provide further pedagogical support. A bibliographic essay and a brief discussion of artistic productions based on the trial are also included.

Laws of Men and Laws of Nature

The History of Scientific Expert Testimony in England and America

Author: Tal GOLAN,Tal Golan

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674037693

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 3997

The Trial of Galileo, 1612-1633

Author: Thomas F. Mayer,Thomas Frederick Mayer

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442605197

Category: History

Page: 210

View: 6838

Examines Galileo's trial as a legal event. Includes correspondence, legal documents, transcripts and excerpts from Galileo's work for critical analysis of primary sources. Includes an introduction detailing Galileo's life and work, the Council of Trent, the role of the papacy and the Roman Inquisition and gives a clear explanation of how a trial before the Inquisition would have been conducted. Each primary source begins with a headnote, questions to guide students through each source and suggested readings.

A Necessary Evil

A History of American Distrust of Government

Author: Garry Wills

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439128790

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 9649

In A Necessary Evil, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills shows that distrust of government is embedded deep in the American psyche. From the revolt of the colonies against king and parliament to present-day tax revolts, militia movements, and debates about term limits, Wills shows that American antigovernment sentiment is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of our history. By debunking some of our fondest myths about the Founding Fathers, the Constitution, and the taming of the frontier, Wills shows us how our tendency to hold our elected government in disdain is misguided.

John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Jonathan Earle

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312392802

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 9155

Despised and admired during his life and after his execution, the abolitionist John Brown polarized the nation and remains one of the most controversial figures in U.S. history. His 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, failed to inspire a slave revolt and establish a free Appalachian state but became a crucial turning point in the fight against slavery and a catalyst for the violence that ignited the Civil War. Jonathan Earle’s volume presents Brown as neither villain nor martyr, but rather as a man whose deeply held abolitionist beliefs gradually evolved to a point where he saw violence as inevitable. Earle’s introduction and his collection of documents demonstrate the evolution of Brown’s abolitionist strategies and the symbolism his actions took on in the press, the government, and the wider culture. The featured documents include Brown’s own writings, eyewitness accounts, government reports, and articles from the popular press and from leading intellectuals. Document headnotes, a chronology, questions for consideration, a list of important figures, and a selected bibliography offer additional pedagogical support.

American Genesis

A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm, 1870-1970

Author: Thomas P. Hughes

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226359274

Category: History

Page: 529

View: 4238

The book that helped earn Thomas P. Hughes his reputation as one of the foremost historians of technology of our age and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1990, American Genesis tells the sweeping story of America's technological revolution. Unlike other histories of technology, which focus on particular inventions like the light bulb or the automobile, American Genesis makes these inventions characters in a broad chronicle, both shaped by and shaping a culture. By weaving scientific and technological advancement into other cultural trends, Hughes demonstrates here the myriad ways in which the two are inexorably linked, and in a new preface, he recounts his earlier missteps in predicting the future of technology and follows its move into the information age.

Retrying Galileo, 1633–1992

Author: Maurice A. Finocchiaro

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520253876

Category: Religion

Page: 485

View: 8595

"This is must reading for historians of science and a delight for the interested public. From his access to many primary sources in the Vatican Library and from his broad knowledge of the history of the 17th century, Finocchiaro acquaints readers in an interesting manner with the historical facts of Galileo's trial, its aftermath, and its repercussions. Unlike many other works which present predetermined and, at times, prejudiced judgments, this work provides exhaustive evidence to allow readers to develop their own informed opinion on the subject.”—George V. Coyne, Director, Vatican Astronomical Observatory “The tragic condemnation of Galileo by the Roman Catholic Church in 1633 has become the single most potent symbol of authoritarian opposition to new ideas. Pioneering in its scope, Finocchiaro's book provides a fascinating account of how the trial and its cultural significance have been freshly reconstructed by scholars and polemicists down the ages. With a philosopher's eye for fine distinctions, the author has written an exciting commentary on the successive appearance of new primary sources and their exploitation for apologetic and secular purposes.”—John Hedley Brooke, author of Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives "If good history begins with good facts, then Retrying Galileo should be the starting point for all future discussions of the post-trial phase of the Galileo affair. Maurice Finocchiaro's myth-busting documentary history is not only a repository of little-known sources but a pleasure to read as well.”—Ronald L. Numbers, co-editor of When Christianity and Science Meet “Retrying Galileo tells the less well-known half of the Galileo affair: its long and complex history after 1633. Finocchiaro has performed an invaluable service in writing a book that explores how the trial and condemnation of Galileo has been received, debated, and reinterpreted for over three and a half centuries. We are not yet done with this contentious story.”—Paula E. Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History and Director of the Science, Technology and Society Program, Stanford University

Trying Leviathan

The Nineteenth-Century New York Court Case That Put the Whale on Trial and Challenged the Order of Nature

Author: D. Graham Burnett

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691146157

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 9239

Recounts the 1818 trial Maurice v. Judd in which the new science of taxonomy was pitted against a dispute over the regulation of whale oil and the then-popular view that the whale was a fish.

Race, Money, and the American Welfare State

Author: Michael K. Brown

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801485107

Category: Political Science

Page: 381

View: 8457

The American welfare state is often blamed for exacerbating social problems confronting African Americans while failing to improve their economic lot. Michael K. Brown contends that our welfare system has in fact denied them the social provision it gives white citizens while stigmatizing them as recipients of government benefits for low income citizens. In his provocative history of America's "safety net" from its origins in the New Deal through much of its dismantling in the 1990s, Brown explains how the forces of fiscal conservatism and racism combined to shape a welfare state in which blacks are disproportionately excluded from mainstream programs. Brown describes how business and middle class opposition to taxes and spending limited the scope of the Social Security Act and work relief programs of the 1930s and the Great Society in the 1960s. These decisions produced a welfare state that relies heavily on privately provided health and pension programs and cash benefits for the poor. In a society characterized by pervasive racial discrimination, this outcome, Michael Brown makes clear, has led to a racially stratified welfare system: by denying African Americans work, whites limited their access to private benefits as well as to social security and other forms of social insurance, making welfare their "main occupation." In his conclusion, Brown addresses the implications of his argument for both conservative and liberal critiques of the Great Society and for policies designed to remedy inner-city poverty.

"Baad Bitches" and Sassy Supermamas

Black Power Action Films

Author: Stephane Dunn

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252091049

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

View: 8121

This lively study unpacks the intersecting racial, sexual, and gender politics underlying the representations of racialized bodies, masculinities, and femininities in early 1970s black action films, with particular focus on the representation of black femininity. Stephane Dunn explores the typical, sexualized, subordinate positioning of women in low-budget blaxploitation action narratives as well as more seriously radical films like Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song and The Spook Who Sat by the Door, in which black women are typically portrayed as trifling "bitches" compared to the supermacho black male heroes. The terms "baad bitches" and "sassy supermamas" signal the reversal of this positioning with the emergence of supermama heroines in the few black action films in the early 1970s that featured self-assured, empowered, and tough (or "baad") black women as protagonists: Cleopatra Jones, Coffy, and Foxy Brown. Dunn offers close examination of a distinct moment in the history of African American representation in popular cinema, tracing its emergence out of a radical political era, influenced especially by the Black Power movement and feminism. "Baad Bitches" and Sassy Supermamas also engages blaxploitation's impact and lingering aura in contemporary hip-hop culture as suggested by its disturbing gender politics and the "baad bitch daughters" of Foxy Brown and Cleopatra Jones, rappers Lil' Kim and Foxy Brown.

Radical Reconstruction

A Brief History with Documents

Author: K. Stephen Prince

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319049494

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 8727

The Reconstruction period following the Civil War was a transformative moment in which political leaders addressed questions concerning the place of the southern states in the postwar nation, the status of formerly enslaved African Americans, and the powers and limitations of the federal government. In this volume K. Stephen Prince explores the important role of the Radical Republicans in pressing for change during this period in a way designed to make the complexities of Reconstruction comprehensible to students. The Introduction introduces the Radical Republicans and details how Reconstruction grew from a complex negotiation among groups with often conflicting agendas. The documents, arranged in thematic and roughly chronological chapters, allow students to sift through the evolution of Radical Reconstruction and its aftermath through speeches, letters, press coverage, legislation, and contemporary illustrations. Document headnotes, a chronology, questions to consider, and a bibliography enrich students’ understanding of Radical Reconstruction.

Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Author: Beth Bailey,Richard H. Immerman

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479836265

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1047

Understanding the United States’ wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is essential to understanding the United States in the first decade of the new millennium and beyond. These wars were pivotal to American foreign policy and international relations. They were expensive: in lives, in treasure, and in reputation. They raised critical ethical and legal questions; they provoked debates over policy, strategy, and war-planning; they helped to shape American domestic politics. And they highlighted a profound division among the American people: While more than two million Americans served in Iraq and Afghanistan, many in multiple deployments, the vast majority of Americans and their families remained untouched by and frequently barely aware of the wars conducted in their name, far from American shores, in regions about which they know little. Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan gives us the first book-length expert historical analysis of these wars. It shows us how they began, what they teach us about the limits of the American military and diplomacy, and who fought them. It examines the lessons and legacies of wars whose outcomes may not be clear for decades. In 1945 few Americans could imagine that the country would be locked in a Cold War with the Soviet Union for decades; fewer could imagine how history would paint the era. Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan begins to come to grips with the period when America became enmeshed in a succession of “low intensity” conflicts in the Middle East. Instructor's Guide

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

Author: Frederick Douglass

Publisher: Big Nest via PublishDrive

ISBN: 1910833819

Category: Fiction

Page: 106

View: 3857

One of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United States, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is a memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life.

The Devil's Dominion

Magic and Religion in Early New England

Author: Richard Godbeer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521466707

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 4917

Early New Englanders used magical techniques to divine the future, to heal the sick, to protect against harm and to inflict harm. Protestant ministers of the time claimed that religious faith and magical practice were incompatible, and yet, as Richard Godbeer shows, there were significant affinities between the two that enabled layfolk to switch from one to the other without any immediate sense of wrongdoing. Godbeer argues that the different perspectives on witchcraft engendered by magical tradition and Puritan doctrine often caused confusion and disagreement when New Englanders sought legal punishment of witches.