The Shame of the Nation

The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307339416

Category: Education

Page: 416

View: 6208

“The nation needs to be confronted with the crime that we’re committing and the promises we are betraying. This is a book about betrayal of the young, who have no power to defend themselves. It is not intended to make readers comfortable.” Over the past several years, Jonathan Kozol has visited nearly 60 public schools. Virtually everywhere, he finds that conditions have grown worse for inner-city children in the 15 years since federal courts began dismantling the landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. First, a state of nearly absolute apartheid now prevails in thousands of our schools. The segregation of black children has reverted to a level that the nation has not seen since 1968. Few of the students in these schools know white children any longer. Second, a protomilitary form of discipline has now emerged, modeled on stick-and-carrot methods of behavioral control traditionally used in prisons but targeted exclusively at black and Hispanic children. And third, as high-stakes testing takes on pathological and punitive dimensions, liberal education in our inner-city schools has been increasingly replaced by culturally barren and robotic methods of instruction that would be rejected out of hand by schools that serve the mainstream of society. Filled with the passionate voices of children and their teachers and some of the most revered and trusted leaders in the black community, The Shame of the Nation is a triumph of firsthand reporting that pays tribute to those undefeated educators who persist against the odds, but directly challenges the chilling practices now being forced upon our urban systems by the Bush administration. In their place, Kozol offers a humane, dramatic challenge to our nation to fulfill at last the promise made some 50 years ago to all our youngest citizens. From The Shame of the Nation “I went to Washington to challenge the soft bigotry of low expectations,” the president said in his campaign for reelection in September 2004. “It’s working. It’s making a difference.” It is one of those deadly lies, which, by sheer repetition, is at length accepted by large numbers of Americans as, perhaps, a rough approximation of the truth. But it is not the truth, and it is not an innocent misstatement of the facts. It is a devious appeasement of the heartache of the parents of the poor and, if it is not forcefully resisted and denounced, it is going to lead our nation even further in a perilous direction. Also available as a Random House AudioBook and an eBook From the Hardcover edition.

Guest Editor'S Introduction Es V40#1

J.KOZOL'S SAVAGE INEQUALAIT.

Author: Abraham P. DeLeon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136506101

Category: Education

Page: 120

View: 5102

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Practice of School Reform

Lessons from Two Centuries

Author: James Nehring

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438428468

Category: Education

Page: 140

View: 4494

Provides practical advice for educators struggling for change.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 17: Education

Author: Clarence L. Mohr

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807877859

Category: Reference

Page: 400

View: 9951

Offering a broad, up-to-date reference to the long history and cultural legacy of education in the American South, this timely volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture surveys educational developments, practices, institutions, and politics from the colonial era to the present. With over 130 articles, this book covers key topics in education, including academic freedom; the effects of urbanization on segregation, desegregation, and resegregation; African American and women's education; and illiteracy. These entries, as well as articles on prominent educators, such as Booker T. Washington and C. Vann Woodward, and major southern universities, colleges, and trade schools, provide an essential context for understanding the debates and battles that remain deeply imbedded in southern education. Framed by Clarence Mohr's historically rich introductory overview, the essays in this volume comprise a greatly expanded and thoroughly updated survey of the shifting southern education landscape and its development over the span of four centuries.

A History of the Cuban Revolution

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444329561

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 8238

A History of the Cuban Revolution presents a concise socio-historical account of the Cuban Revolution of 1959, an event that continues to spark debate 50 years later. Balances a comprehensive overview of the political and economic events of the revolution with a look at the revolution’s social impact Provides a lively, on-the-ground look at the lives of ordinary people Features both U.S. and Cuban perspectives to provide a complete and well-rounded look at the revolution and its repercussions Encourages students to understand history through the viewpoint of individuals living it Selected as a 2011 Outstanding Academic Title by CHOICE

Teachers versus the Public

What Americans Think about Schools and How to Fix Them

Author: Paul E. Peterson,Michael Henderson,Martin R. West

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 0815725531

Category: Education

Page: 177

View: 9193

A comprehensive exploration of 21st Century school politics, Teachers versus the Public offers the first comparison of the education policy views of both teachers and the public as a whole, and reveals a deep, broad divide between the opinions held by citizens and those who teach in the public schools. Among the findings: • Divisions between teachers and the public are wider and deeper than differences between other groups often thought to contest school policy, such as Republicans and Democrats, the young and the old, the rich and the poor, or African Americans and whites. • The teacher-public gap is widest on such issues as merit pay, teacher tenure reform, impact of teacher unions, school vouchers, charter schools, and requirements to test students annually. • Public support for school vouchers for all students, charter schools, and parent trigger laws increases sharply when people are informed of the national ranking of student performance in their local school district. • Public willingness to give local schools high marks, its readiness to support higher spending levels, and its support for teacher unions all decline when the public learns the national ranking of their local schools. • On most issues, teacher opinion does not change in response to new information nearly as much as it does for the public as a whole. In fact, the gap between what teachers and the public think about school reform grows even wider when both teachers and the public are given more information about current school performance, current expenditure levels, and current teacher pay. The book provides the first experimental study of public and teacher opinion. Using a recently developed research strategy, the authors ask differently worded questions about the same topic to randomly chosen segments of representative groups of citizens. This approach allows them to identify the impact on public opinion of new information on issues such as student performance and school expenditures in each respondent's community. The changes in public opinion when citizens receive information about school performance are largest in districts that perform below the national average. Altogether, the results indicate that support for many school reforms would increase if common core state standards were established and implemented in such a way as to inform the public about the quality of their local schools. These and many other findings illuminate the distance between teacher opinions and those of the public at large. About the Research: In partnership with the Harvard Program on Education Policy and Governance and the journal, Education Next, authors Paul E. Peterson, Martin West and Michael Henderson surveyed nationally representative samples of teachers and the public as a whole annually between 2007 and 2013.

We Can't Teach what We Don't Know

White Teachers, Multiracial Schools

Author: Gary R. Howard

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807746653

Category: Education

Page: 172

View: 6824

Once again, in this expanded Second Edition, Gary Howard outlines what good teachers know, what they do, and how they embrace culturally responsive teaching. Howard brings his bestselling book completely up to date with today's school reform efforts and includes a new introduction and a new chapter that speak directly to current issues such as closing the achievement gap, and to recent legislation such as No Child Left Behind. With our nation's student population becoming ever more diverse, and teachers remaining largely White, this book is now more important than ever. A must-read in universities and school systems throughout the country, We Can't Teach What We Don't Know continues to facilitate and deepen the discussion of race and social justice in education.

Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice

Author: Franklin E. Zimring,David S. Tanenhaus

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479841560

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 5904

This is a hopeful but complicated era for those with ambitions to reform the juvenile courts and youth-serving public institutions in the United States. As advocates plea for major reforms, many fear the public backlash in making dramatic changes. Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice provides a look at the recent trends in juvenile justice as well as suggestions for reforms and policy changes in the future. Should youth be treated as adults when they break the law? How can youth be deterred from crime? What factors should be considered in how youth are punished?What role should the police have in schools? This essential volume, edited by two of the leading scholars on juvenile justice, and with contributors who are among the key experts on each issue, the volume focuses on the most pressing issues of the day: the impact of neuroscience on our understanding of brain development and subsequent sentencing, the relationship of schools and the police, the issue of the school-to-prison pipeline, the impact of immigration, the privacy of juvenile records, and the need for national policies—including registration requirements--for juvenile sex offenders. Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice is not only a timely collection, based on the most current research, but also a forward-thinking volume that anticipates the needs for substantive and future changes in juvenile justice.

Race and Racism in the United States: An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic [4 volumes]

An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic

Author: Charles A. Gallagher,Cameron D. Lippard

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440803463

Category: Social Science

Page: 1771

View: 8740

How is race defined and perceived in America today, and how do these definitions and perceptions compare to attitudes 100 years ago... or 200 years ago? This four-volume set is the definitive source for every topic related to race in the United States.

Five Miles Away, A World Apart

One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in Modern America

Author: James E. Ryan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199798923

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 1873

How is it that, half a century after Brown v. Board of Education, educational opportunities remain so unequal for black and white students, not to mention poor and wealthy ones? In his important new book, Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James E. Ryan answers this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia--one in the city and the other in the suburbs. Ryan shows how court rulings in the 1970s, limiting the scope of desegregation, laid the groundwork for the sharp disparities between urban and suburban public schools that persist to this day. The Supreme Court, in accord with the wishes of the Nixon administration, allowed the suburbs to lock nonresidents out of their school systems. City schools, whose student bodies were becoming increasingly poor and black, simply received more funding, a measure that has proven largely ineffective, while the independence (and superiority) of suburban schools remained sacrosanct. Weaving together court opinions, social science research, and compelling interviews with students, teachers, and principals, Ryan explains why all the major education reforms since the 1970s--including school finance litigation, school choice, and the No Child Left Behind Act--have failed to bridge the gap between urban and suburban schools and have unintentionally entrenched segregation by race and class. As long as that segregation continues, Ryan forcefully argues, so too will educational inequality. Ryan closes by suggesting innovative ways to promote school integration, which would take advantage of unprecedented demographic shifts and an embrace of diversity among young adults. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written by one of the nation's leading education law scholars, Five Miles Away, A World Apart ties together, like no other book, a half-century's worth of education law and politics into a coherent, if disturbing, whole. It will be of interest to anyone who has ever wondered why our schools are so unequal and whether there is anything to be done about it.

Rethinking Value-Added Models in Education

Critical Perspectives on Tests and Assessment-Based Accountability

Author: Audrey Amrein-Beardsley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136702849

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 577

Since passage of the of No Child Left Behind Act in 2001, academic researchers, econometricians, and statisticians have been exploring various analytical methods of documenting students‘ academic progress over time. Known as value-added models (VAMs), these methods are meant to measure the value a teacher or school adds to student learning from one year to the next. To date, however, there is very little evidence to support the trustworthiness of these models. What is becoming increasingly evident, yet often ignored mainly by policymakers, is that VAMs are 1) unreliable, 2) invalid, 3) nontransparent, 4) unfair, 5) fraught with measurement errors and 6) being inappropriately used to make consequential decisions regarding such things as teacher pay, retention, and termination. Unfortunately, their unintended consequences are not fully recognized at this point either. Given such, the timeliness of this well-researched and thoughtful book cannot be overstated. This book sheds important light on the debate surrounding VAMs and thereby offers states and practitioners a highly important resource from which they can move forward in more research-based ways.

101 Careers in Social Work, Second Edition

Author: Dr. Jessica A. Ritter, BSW, MSSW, PhD

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 0826129064

Category: Social Science

Page: 314

View: 3497

PRAISE FOR THE FIRST EDITION: "This is a vital and necessary guide to the social work profession. This book clarifies the social work mission, goals, and objectives, and strengthens and promotes them as well." óCarmen Ortiz Hendricks, MSW, DSW, ACSW, LCSW Professor & Dean, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Yeshiva University "The authors do an excellent job of illustrating the uniqueness, diversity, and richness of the profession. I strongly recommend this book for use in social work orientation, advising, and education." óSaundra Starks, EdD, LCSW, Professor, Western Kentucky University What do documentary filmmakers, conflict mediators, forensic social workers, researchers, mental health practitioners, human services administrators, medical social workers, and policy advocates have in common? They are all potential careers for social workers. The second edition of this popular guide to social work careers has been completely updated and expanded to reflect current trends in social work education and social work practice, including the employment outlook in various fields of practice, current accreditation standards, core competencies, and licensing requirements, along with new opportunities for social workers resulting from health care reform and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. With a focus on the interdisciplinary nature of social work, the book describes both traditional careers and those that are off the beaten path in such arenas as forensic social work, social entrepreneurship, working in political systems, international careers, and community practice. Well organized and written in a conversational tone, each chapter describes a particular social work domain, illustrating specific careers within that field including best features, challenges, required core competencies and skills, and educational and licensing requirements needed to succeed. For each career the book also discusses employment outlook and includes recommended references for more in-depth information. Vivid stories from social workers across the country further help readers to choose a career that is a good fit. Additionally, the book includes updated job-hunting tools and websites, including international opportunities, and ways to offset the high cost of higher education. Questionnaires and self-assessment checklists provide additional fodder to help readers choose a social work career tailored to their unique talents, interests, and passions. New to the Second Edition: Presents updated accreditation standards, core competencies, and licensing requirements Describes new opportunities for social workers resulting from health care reform and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Discusses the impact of our current social, economic, and political climate on the profession Includes new career-planning and job-hunting tools Addresses how students can offset the high cost of higher education

Consuming Mexican Labor

From the Bracero Program to NAFTA

Author: Ronald Mize,Alicia Swords

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442604093

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7263

Mexican migration to the United States and Canada is a highly contentious issue in the eyes of many North Americans, and every generation seems to construct the northward flow of labor as a brand new social problem. The history of Mexican labor migration to the United States, from the Bracero Program (1942-1964) to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), suggests that Mexicans have been actively encouraged to migrate northward when labor markets are in short supply, only to be turned back during economic downturns. In this timely book, Mize and Swords dissect the social relations that define how corporations, consumers, and states involve Mexican immigrant laborers in the politics of production and consumption. The result is a comprehensive and contemporary look at the increasingly important role that Mexican immigrants play in the North American economy.

Schools Under Surveillance

Cultures of Control in Public Education

Author: Torin Monahan,Rodolfo D Torres

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813548265

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 5800

Schools under Surveillance gathers together some of the very best researchers studying surveillance and discipline in contemporary public schools. Surveillance is not simply about monitoring or tracking individuals and their dataùit is about the structuring of power relations through human, technical, or hybrid control mechanisms. Essays cover a broad range of topics including police and military recruiters on campus, testing and accountability regimes such as No Child Left Behind, and efforts by students and teachers to circumvent the most egregious forms of surveillance in public education. Each contributor is committed to the continued critique of the disparity and inequality in the use of surveillance to target and sort students along lines of race, class, and gender.

City Kids, City Schools

More Reports from the Front Row

Author: William Ayers,Gloria Ladson-Billings,Gregory Michie

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585605

Category: Education

Page: 384

View: 1625

Of the approximately 50 million public school students in the United States, more than half are in urban schools. A contemporary companion to City Kids, City Teachers: Reports from the Front Row, this new and timely collection has been compiled by four of the country’s most prominent urban educators. Contributors including Sandra Cisneros, Jonathan Kozol, Sapphire, and Patricia J. Williams provide some of the best writing on life in city schools and neighborhoods. Young people and practicing teachers, poets and scholars, social critics and journalists offer unique takes on topics ranging from culturally relevant teaching and scripted curricula to the criminalization of youth, gentrification, and the inequities of school funding. In the words of Sonia Nieto, City Kids, City Schools “challenge[s] the conventional wisdom of what it means to teach in urban schools.”

African American Families

Author: Angela J. Hattery,Earl Smith

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483316882

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 408

View: 1012

"Bravo to the authors! They have done an excellent job addressing the issues that are critical to community members, policy makers and interventionists concerned with Black families in the context of our nation." —Michael C. Lambert, University of Missouri, Colombia "African American Families is a timely work. The strength of this text lies in the depth of coverage, clarity, and the ability to combine secondary sources, statistics and qualitative data to reveal the plight of African Americans in society." —Edward Opoku-Dapaah, Winston-Salem State University "African American Families is both engaging and challenging and is perhaps one of the most important works I have read in many years. This book will most certainly move the discourse of the socio-economic conditions of black families forward, beyond the boundaries already set by other books in the market. African American Families is an excellent book whose time has come, and one that I would most definitely adopt." —Lateef O. Badru, University of Louisville African American Families provides a systematic sociological study of contemporary life for families of African descent living in the United States. Analyzing both quantitative and qualitative data, authors Angela J. Hattery and Earl Smith identify the structural barriers that African Americans face in their attempts to raise their children and create loving, healthy, and raise the children of the next generation. Key Features: Uses the lens provided by the race, class, and gender paradigm: Examples illustrate the ways in which multiple systems of oppression interact with patterns of self-defeating behavior to create barriers that deny many African Americans access to the American dream. Addresses issues not fully or adequately addressed in previous books on Black families: These issues include personal responsibility and disproportionately high rates of incarceration, family violence, and chronic illnesses like HIV/AIDS. Brings statistical data to life: The authors weave personal stories based on interviews they've conducted into the usual data from scholarly(?) literature and from U.S. Census Bureau reports. Provides several illustrations from Hurricane Katrina: A contemporary analysis of a recent disaster demonstrates many of the issues presented in the book such as housing segregation and predatory lending practices. Offers extensive data tables in the appendices: Assembled in easy-to-read tables, students are given access to the latest national agencies data from agencies including the U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control, and Bureau of Justice Statistics. Intended Audience: This is an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as African American Families, Sociology of the Family, Contemporary Families, and Race and Ethnicity in the departments of Human Development and Family Studies, Sociology, African American Studies, and Black Studies.

Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society

Author: Richard T. Schaefer

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412926947

Category: Social Science

Page: 1622

View: 6266

This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area

New Essays in Moral Philosophy

Author: Ellen F. Paul,Jeffrey Paul,Fred D. Miller, Jr.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107634199

Category: Philosophy

Page: 511

View: 2159

Race, Remembering, and Jim Crow’s Teachers

Author: Hilton Kelly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113697590X

Category: Social Science

Page: 154

View: 1207

This book explores a profoundly negative narrative about legally segregated schools in the United States being "inherently inferior" compared to their white counterparts. However, there are overwhelmingly positive counter-memories of these schools as "good and valued" among former students, teachers, and community members. Using interview data with 44 former teachers in three North Carolina counties, college and university archival materials, and secondary historical sources, the author argues that "Jim Crow’s teachers" remember from hidden transcripts—latent reports of the social world created and lived in all-black schools and communities—which reveal hidden social relations and practices that were constructed away from powerful white educational authorities. The author concludes that the national memory of "inherently inferior" all-black schools does not tell the whole story about legally segregated education; the collective remembering of Jim Crow’s teachers reveal a critique of power and a fight for respectability that shaped teachers’ work in the Age of Segregation.

Becoming Right

How Campuses Shape Young Conservatives

Author: Amy J. Binder,Kate Wood

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400844878

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 5796

Conservative pundits allege that the pervasive liberalism of America's colleges and universities has detrimental effects on undergraduates, most particularly right-leaning ones. Yet not enough attention has actually been paid to young conservatives to test these claims—until now. In Becoming Right, Amy Binder and Kate Wood carefully explore who conservative students are, and how their beliefs and political activism relate to their university experiences. Rich in interviews and insight, Becoming Right illustrates that the diverse conservative movement evolving among today’s college students holds important implications for the direction of American politics.