The Soccer War

Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804151105

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 1138

Part diary and part reportage, The Soccer War is a remarkable chronicle of war in the late twentieth century. Between 1958 and 1980, working primarily for the Polish Press Agency, Kapuscinski covered twenty-seven revolutions and coups in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Here, with characteristic cogency and emotional immediacy, he recounts the stories behind his official press dispatches—searing firsthand accounts of the frightening, grotesque, and comically absurd aspects of life during war. The Soccer War is a singular work of journalism.

Scarcity and Survival in Central America

Ecological Origins of the Soccer War

Author: William Durham

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804711542

Category: Political Science

Page: 209

View: 2686

Looking at both population and land tenure dynamics in their historical context, this study challenges the view that the 1969 conflict between El Salvador and Honduras was primarily a response to population pressure. The author demonstrates that land scarcity, a principal cause of the war, was largely a product of the concentration of landholdings. The analysis focuses on the emigration of 300,000 Salvadoreans to Honduras in the years before the war, inquiring into the reasons for the emigration, its impact on local agricultural economies, and its relation to the conflict. Answers to these questions are based on a new interpretation of national statistics and on original survey research in peasant communities. The author has used an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on the perspectives of anthropology, ecology, history, demography, and geography. In addition to its value as a case study in human ecology, this book gives a clear account of the nature and origins of ecological pressures in rural Central America. The book is illustrated with 21 photographs and 7 maps.

The 100 Hour War

The Conflict Between Honduras and El Salvador in July 1969

Author: Mario Overall,Dan Hagedorn

Publisher: Helion

ISBN: 9781911096504

Category:

Page: 104

View: 933

In July 1969, while the world was expectant about the upcoming first manned landing on the moon, two little-known Central American States crossed sabers in what was derogatorily coined by the media as 'The Soccer War'. Far from a simple out-of-hand sports passion, this conflict had its complicated origins back in the early 20th century when the North American companies United Fruit and its rival, Standard Fruit, operated in Honduras - and both deemed it necessary to import workers from El Salvador, since the locals were insufficient in numbers. What followed was an exodus of more than 300,000 Salvadorans who settled in Honduras - and for a while, the latter country's government saw this with good eyes. That is until the early 1960s, when political changes and the liberalization of the region's commerce through the Common Market Treaty made it painfully evident that the country that benefited the most from it was El Salvador, while Honduras would be destined to carry a heavy economic burden. Inevitably, it chilled the relations between the two countries and had a direct bearing in the treatment from the Hondurans towards the Salvadoran peasants. Amidst sporadic violence against the immigrant peasants, the two governments began negotiations aimed at solving the immigration problem and signed three agreements. However, while the negotiations were taking place, clandestine armed groups were organized in Honduras with the purpose of harassing and controlling the Salvadoran people living in that country. This situation was worsened by a coup d'etat that brought to the presidency the Honduran General Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, who had a very different point of view than his predecessor regarding the immigrants' situation. Shortly after, the expelling of thousands of Salvadorans began. The return of the peasants to El Salvador brought a series of problems for that country, since all were returning unemployed and needing food, clothing and some kind of shelter - all of this in the midst of an economic crisis that not even the advantages obtained through the Common Market Treaty had been able to alleviate. Thus, it didn't take long for the Salvadoran society to begin clamoring for some sort of military response against Honduras. With this delicate political background, the eliminatory rounds for the Jules Rimet World Soccer Cup (to be held in Mexico the next year) began - and during these, the national teams of El Salvador and Honduras would have to face each other in order to obtain a classification. During those games, the violence against Salvadoran immigrants in Honduras increased and caused strong protests from the Salvadoran Government, which ended in the rupturing of diplomatic relations and followed by additional border incidents, which included the strafing of a Honduran airliner while it was taking off from Nueva Ocotepeque. Eleven days later, the war began. This book, backed by more than 20 years of research, explores meticulously the actions undertaken by both countries in the air and on the ground during this short but intense confrontation, and that saw the last dogfights between World War II-era piston-engine aircraft in the world. Besides an impressive selection of photos, the book also features a section of color profiles and markings, and a set of tables detailing the identities of the aircraft operated by both countries during the conflict.

Fishing in Africa

A Guide to War and Corruption

Author: Andrew Buckoke

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Africa

Page: 232

View: 2648

Shah of Shahs

Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547544901

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 6954

This journalist’s portrait of life in Iran just after the Revolution is “a book of great economy and power [with] a supreme sense of the absurd” (New Republic). Iran, 1980: the revolutionaries have taken charge. In a deserted Teheran hotel, Ryszard Kapuściński tries to make journalistic and human sense out of the mass of notes, tapes, and photographs he had accumulated during his extended stay in Iran. Just what happened and how? What did Khomeini have to offer that the Shah, who promised to “create a second America within a generation,” did not? Where did the revolution come from, and where is it going? After all this blood has been spilled, what has it given its people or the world? “We have given [the world] poetry, the miniature, and carpets,” says a rug merchant in Teheran. “We have given the world this miraculous, Unique uselessness.” Kapuściński tells a rich story that combines factual reporting with his own impressions and reflections. Always engrossing and frequently revelatory, it is a unique portrait of the psychological state of a country in revolution.

Ryszard Kapuscinski

A Life

Author: Artur Domoslawski

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1844679187

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 464

View: 9066

Reporting from such varied locations as postcolonial Africa, revolutionary Iran, the military dictatorships of Latin America and Soviet Russia, the Polish journalist and writer Ryszard Kapu?ci?ski was one of the most influential eyewitness journalists of the twentieth century. During the Cold War, he was a dauntless investigator as well as a towering literary talent, and books such as The Emperor and Travels with Herodotus founded the new genre of ‘literary reportage’. It was an achievement that brought him global renown, not to mention the uninvited attentions of the CIA. In this definitive biography, Artur Domos?awski shines a new light on the personal relationships of this intensely charismatic, deeply private man, examining the intractable issue at the heart of Kapu?ci?ski’s life and work: the relationship and tension between journalism and literature. In researching this book, Domos?awski, himself an award-winning foreign correspondent, enjoyed unprecedented access to Kapu?ci?ski’s private papers. The result traces his mentor’s footsteps through Africa and Latin America, delves into files and archives that Kapu?ci?ski himself examined, and records conversations with the people that he talked to in the course of his own investigations. Ryszard Kapu?ci?ski is a meticulous, riveting portrait of a complex man of intense curiosity living at the heart of dangerous times.

War's Ends

Human Rights, International Order, and the Ethics of Peace

Author: James G. Murphy, SJ

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1626160287

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 9506

Before military action, and even before mobilization, the decision on whether to go to war is debated by politicians, pundits, and the public. As they address the right or wrong of such action, it is also a time when, in the language of the just war tradition, the wise would deeply investigate their true claim to jus ad bellum (“the right of war”). Wars have negative consequences, not the least impinging on human life, and offer infrequent and uncertain benefits, yet war is part of the human condition. James G. Murphy’s insightful analysis of the jus ad bellum criteria—competent authority, just cause, right intention, probability of success, last resort, and proportionality—is grounded in a variety of contemporary examples from World War I through Vietnam, the "soccer war" between Honduras and El Salvador, Afghanistan, and the Middle East conflict. Murphy argues persuasively that understanding jus ad bellum requires a primary focus on the international common good and the good of peace. Only secondarily should the argument about going to war hinge on the right of self-defense; in fact, pursuing the common good requires political action, given that peace is not simply the absence of violence. He moves on to demonstrate the interconnectedness of the jus ad bellum criteria, contending that some criteria depend logically on others—and that competent authority, not just cause, is ultimately the most significant criterion in an analysis of going to war. This timely study will be of special interest to scholars and students in ethics, war and peace, and international affairs.

Another Day of Life

Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307424839

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 8622

In 1975, Angola was tumbling into pandemonium; everyone who could was packing crates, desperate to abandon the beleaguered colony. With his trademark bravura, Ryszard Kapuscinski went the other way, begging his was from Lisbon and comfort to Luanda—once famed as Africa's Rio de Janeiro—and chaos.Angola, a slave colony later given over to mining and plantations, was a promised land for generations of poor Portuguese. It had belonged to Portugal since before there were English-speakers in North America. After the collapse of the fascist dictatorship in Portugal in 1974, Angola was brusquely cut loose, spurring the catastrophe of a still-ongoing civil war. Kapuscinski plunged right into the middle of the drama, driving past thousands of haphazardly placed check-points, where using the wrong shibboleth was a matter of life and death; recording his imporessions of the young soldiers—from Cuba, Angola, South Africa, Portugal—fighting a nebulous war with global repercussions; and examining the peculiar brutality of a country surprised and divided by its newfound freedom.Translated from the Polish by William R. Brand and Katarzyna Mroczkowska-Brand.

El Salvador

The Land

Author: Greg Nickles

Publisher: Crabtree Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780778793670

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 1670

Stunning photographs capture the lush landscape of El Salvador from the Pacific coastline to the volcanic mountains and rainforests. Discover the people, cities, and wildlife of the smallest and most densely populated country of Central America.

Among the Thugs

Author: Bill Buford

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804150516

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 1798

They have names like Barmy Bernie, Daft Donald, and Steamin' Sammy. They like lager (in huge quantities), the Queen, football clubs (especially Manchester United), and themselves. Their dislike encompasses the rest of the known universe, and England's soccer thugs express it in ways that range from mere vandalism to riots that terrorize entire cities. Now Bill Buford, editor of the prestigious journal Granta, enters this alternate society and records both its savageries and its sinister allure with the social imagination of a George Orwell and the raw personal engagement of a Hunter Thompson.

Bigger Field Awaits Us

The Scottish Football Team That Fought the Great War

Author: Andrew Beaujon

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 0897337387

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7447

A captivating and poignant tale, this is the little-known story of a group of Scottish athletes and their fans who went to war together—and what happened to the few who made it home. The saga of McCrae's Battalion brings much-needed human scale to World War I and explains why a group of young men from a small country with almost no direct connection to the conflict would end up sacrificing their careers, their homes, their health, and in many cases their lives to an abstract cause.

The Shadow of the Sun

Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 0307367096

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 7898

A moving portrait of Africa from Poland's most celebrated foreign correspondent - a masterpiece from a modern master. Famous for being in the wrong places at just the right times, Ryszard Kapuscinski arrived in Africa in 1957, at the beginning of the end of colonial rule - the "sometimes dramatic and painful, sometimes enjoyable and jubilant" rebirth of a continent. The Shadow of the Sun sums up the author's experiences ("the record of a 40-year marriage") in this place that became the central obsession of his remarkable career. From the hopeful years of independence through the bloody disintegration of places like Nigeria, Rwanda and Angola, Kapuscinski recounts great social and political changes through the prism of the ordinary African. He examines the rough-and-ready physical world and identifies the true geography of Africa: a little-understood spiritual universe, an African way of being. He looks also at Africa in the wake of two epoch-making changes: the arrival of AIDS and the definitive departure of the white man. Kapuscinski's rare humanity invests his subjects with a grandeur and a dignity unmatched by any other writer on the Third World, and his unique ability to discern the universal in the particular has never been more powerfully displayed than in this work. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Wars and Peace Treaties

1816 to 1991

Author: Dr Erik Goldstein,Erik Goldstein

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134899114

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7327

First published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Soccer in Sun and Shadow

Author: Eduardo Galeano

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781859844236

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 244

View: 2403

Cover note: Revisd edition including commentary on the 2002 World Cup.

Imperium

A Novel of Ancient Rome

Author: Robert Harris

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743293877

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 8190

From the bestselling author of Fatherland and Pompeii, comes the first novel of a trilogy about the struggle for power in ancient Rome. In his “most accomplished work to date” (Los Angeles Times), master of historical fiction Robert Harris lures readers back in time to the compelling life of Roman Senator Marcus Cicero. The re-creation of a vanished biography written by his household slave and righthand man, Tiro, Imperium follows Cicero’s extraordinary struggle to attain supreme power in Rome. On a cold November morning, Tiro opens the door to find a terrified, bedraggled stranger begging for help. Once a Sicilian aristocrat, the man was robbed by the corrupt Roman governor, Verres, who is now trying to convict him under false pretenses and sentence him to a violent death. The man claims that only the great senator Marcus Cicero, one of Rome’s most ambitious lawyers and spellbinding orators, can bring him justice in a crooked society manipulated by the villainous governor. But for Cicero, it is a chance to prove himself worthy of absolute power. What follows is one of the most gripping courtroom dramas in history, and the beginning of a quest for political glory by a man who fought his way to the top using only his voice—defeating the most daunting figures in Roman history.

More Noble Than War

A Soccer History of Israel-Palestine

Author: Nicholas Blincoe

Publisher: Nation Books

ISBN: 9781568588889

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 6302

By turns tragic and uplifting, the history of Israel and Palestine through the lens of the world's most popular sport--soccer. Soccer has never been apolitical. This is especially true for Israel and Palestine. The sport was introduced originally through the church, and then encouraged by the British Army, with Jews and Arabs playing on the same team. After the creation of Israel in 1948, teams split down Jewish and Arab lines and tensions grew. For Palestine, soccer continues primarily abroad, where the top four teams in Jordan are refugee teams; while Israel has a thriving domestic league. But some of Israel's best players are of Palestinian descent--creating a rare occurrence in which a Palestinian is heralded and praised by Israelis. In recent years, efforts are being made to bridge the divide between Israelis and Palestinians with mixed youth leagues. This is a vibrant and often shocking story filled with driven, even ferocious people who are inspired by nationalism as much as a love of the game. There are many sacrifices, as brilliant teams are scattered by wars, sidelined through boycotts, and stories of players arrested, expelled, driven to hunger strikes, and beaten or shot. It is a story not simply of Jewish-Arab rivalry, but also deep and often violent animosities within both communities. In this unusual history of the world's most intractable conflict, Nicholas Blincoe sets out to answer questions such as: it hopelessly romantic to think of soccer as a fourth field, beyond farmlands, graveyards and battlefields? Or will it always be just another space to be fought over and polluted?

Soccer at War

1939 - 45

Author: Jack Rollin

Publisher: Headline Book Pub Limited

ISBN: 9780755314317

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 464

View: 9131

Soccer at War is the compelling account of the national game during this defining moment in history. Rollin reveals how it was that football not only continued to be played and watched, but also grew in popularity and stature. He explains how, while the country fought for freedom, the sport offered morale-boosting appeal to war workers, servicemen, and civilians alike. The book tells of the hundreds of professional footballers who joined up, those who became heroes, and those who did not come back, the enthusiasts who administered the game in their spare time, and the players who turned out for thirty bob a week. The servicemen who went AWOL to play and others who hitch-hiked just to get to a game also find their place in the story, along with the record-breaking goalscoring achievements. Looking further afield to occupied Europe, Soccer at War also exposes the role of football in Hitler's regime.

Obama's Wars

Author: Bob Woodward

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439172501

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 3378

Shows President Obama making the critical decisions on the Afghanistan War, the secret war in Pakistan, and the worldwide fight against terrorism.

The Emperor

Downfall of an Autocrat

Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547539215

Category: History

Page: 164

View: 5395

This account of the rise and fall of Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie is “an unforgettable, fiercely comic, and finally compassionate book” (Salman Rushdie, Man Booker Prize–winning author). After Haile Selassie was deposed in 1974, Ryszard Kapuściński—Poland’s top foreign correspondent—went to Ethiopia to piece together a firsthand account of how the emperor governed his country, and why he finally fell from power. At great risk to himself, Kapuściński interviewed members of the imperial circle who had gone into hiding. The result is this remarkable book, in which Selassie’s servants and closest associates share accounts—humorous, frightening, sad, grotesque—of a man living amidst nearly unimaginable pomp and luxury while his people teetered between hunger and starvation. It is a classic portrait of authoritarianism, and a fascinating story of a forty-four-year reign that ended with a coup d’état in 1974.

Billy the Kid

Author: Michael Morpurgo

Publisher: Pavilion Books Limited

ISBN: 9781843652601

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 80

View: 3105

Billy's no kid - he's eighty today. He's enjoying watching the boys in the park knock a football around and this afternoon he'll be cheering on his team, Chelsea, as he has done all his life. In 1939 Billy was picked for Chelsea. Not quite nineteen, and his dreams had come true: 'Billy! Billy the Kid!' they shouted as he scored goal after goal. Surely life could get no better. But in 1939 too, the Second World War began and Billy's life was never to be the same again. Through the story of 'Billy the Kid', Michael Morpurgo reaches across the generations and with Michael Foreman's nostalgically vivid illustrations, creates a life with a past that will be moving and inspiring for young and old alike