The Souls of Black Folk

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois,David W. Blight,Robert Gooding-Williams

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312091149

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 2231

One of the most influential and widely read texts in all of African American letters and history, The Souls of Black Folk combines some of the most enduring reflections on black identity, the meaning of emancipation,and Afican American culture. This new edition reprints the original 1903 edition of W.E.B. Du Bois's classic work with the fullest set of annotations of any version yet published, together with two related essays, and numerous letters Du Bois received and wrote concerning his widely read text. The introductory essay combines the sensibilities of a historian and a philosopher to capture the contours of Du Bois's life and writings along with the early-twentieth-century reception to the book. Photographs, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are also included.

The Souls of Black Folk

Author: William Edward Burghardt Du Bois,David W. Blight,Robert Gooding-Williams

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312128067

Category: Social Science

Page: 287

View: 3383

A turn-of-the century publication analyzes the status of Blacks and their place, not only in the American South, but also in the history of the world

Black Church Studies

An Introduction

Author: Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas,Juan Floyd-Thomas,Carol B. Duncan

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 0687332656

Category: Religion

Page: 287

View: 7174

Religious Studies Over the last thirty years African American voices and perspectives have become essential to the study of the various theological disciplines. Writing out of their particular position in the North American context, African American thinkers have contributed significantly to biblical studies, theology, church history, ethics, sociology of religion, homiletics, pastoral care, and a number of other fields. Frequently the work of these African American scholars is brought together in the seminary curriculum under the rubric of the black church studies class. Drawing on these several disciplines, the black church studies class seeks to give an account of the broad meaning of Christian faith in the African American experience. Up to now, however, there has not been a single, comprehensive textbook designed to meet the needs of students and instructors in these classes. Black Church Studies: An Introduction will meet that need. Drawing on the work of specialists in several fields, it introduces all of the core theological disciplines from an African American standpoint, from African American biblical interpretation to womanist theology and and ethics to sociological understandings of the life of African American churches. It will become an indispensable resource for all those preparing to serve in African American congregations, or to understand African American contributions to the study of Christian faith. Looks at the diverse definitions and functions of the Black Church as well as the ways in which race, class, religion, and gender inform its evolution. Provides a comprehensive view of the contributions of African American Scholarship to the current theological discussion. Written by scholars with broad expertise in a number of subject areas and disciplines. Will enable the reader to relate the work of African American theological scholars to the tasks of preaching, teaching, and leading in local congregations. Will provide the reader the most comprehensive understanding of African American theological scholarship available in one volume. Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Brite Divinity School Juan Floyd-Thomas, Texas Christian University Carol B. Duncan, Wilfrid Laurier University Stephen G. Ray Jr., Lutheran Theological Seminary-Philadelphia Nancy Lynne Westfield, Drew University Theology/Theology and Doctrine/Contemporary Theology

Raised Up Down Yonder

Growing Up Black in Rural Alabama

Author: Angela McMillan Howell

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496800311

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3248

Raised Up Down Yonder attempts to shift focus away from why black youth are “problematic” to explore what their daily lives actually entail. Howell travels to the small community of Hamilton, Alabama, to investigate what it is like for a young black person to grow up in the contemporary rural South. What she finds is that the young people of Hamilton are neither idly passing their time in a stereotypically languid setting nor are they being corrupted by hip-hop culture and the perils of the urban North, as many pundits suggest. Rather, they are dynamic and diverse young people making their way through the structures that define the twenty-first-century South. Told through the poignant stories of several high school students, Raised Up Down Yonder reveals a group that is often rendered invisible in society. Blended families, football sagas, crunk music, expanding social networks, and a nearby segregated prom are just a few of the fascinating juxtapositions.

Country Soul

Making Music and Making Race in the American South

Author: Charles L. Hughes

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469622440

Category: Music

Page: 280

View: 8194

In the sound of the 1960s and 1970s, nothing symbolized the rift between black and white America better than the seemingly divided genres of country and soul. Yet the music emerged from the same songwriters, musicians, and producers in the recording studios of Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee, and Muscle Shoals, Alabama--what Charles L. Hughes calls the "country-soul triangle." In legendary studios like Stax and FAME, integrated groups of musicians like Booker T. and the MGs and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section produced music that both challenged and reconfirmed racial divisions in the United States. Working with artists from Aretha Franklin to Willie Nelson, these musicians became crucial contributors to the era's popular music and internationally recognized symbols of American racial politics in the turbulent years of civil rights protests, Black Power, and white backlash. Hughes offers a provocative reinterpretation of this key moment in American popular music and challenges the conventional wisdom about the racial politics of southern studios and the music that emerged from them. Drawing on interviews and rarely used archives, Hughes brings to life the daily world of session musicians, producers, and songwriters at the heart of the country and soul scenes. In doing so, he shows how the country-soul triangle gave birth to new ways of thinking about music, race, labor, and the South in this pivotal period.

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1896 to the Present

From the Age of Segregation to the Twenty-first Century Five-volume Set

Author: Paul Finkelman,Cary D. Wintz

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195167791

Category: History

Page: 2672

View: 2780

Alphabetically-arranged entries from A to C that explores significant events, major persons, organizations, and political and social movements in African-American history from 1896 to the twenty-first-century.

Die Seelen der Schwarzen

Author: William E. B. Du Bois

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783936086072

Category: African Americans

Page: 319

View: 5765

Affirmative action as we don't know it

the evolution of undergraduate admissions policy at UC-Berkeley, UT-Austin, and UW-Madison

Author: Daniel N. Lipson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 452

View: 3492

Children of Fire

A History of African Americans

Author: Thomas C. Holt

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9780809067138

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 2087

Ordinary people don’t experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In Children of Fire, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin’s From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages—Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama—but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.

Perspectives

Newsletter of the American Historical Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 818

Encyclopedia of African American Society

Author: Gerald David Jaynes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 1058

View: 9136

An encyclopedic reference of African American history and culture.

Black Writers

A Selection of Sketches from Contemporary Authors

Author: Sharon Malinowski

Publisher: Gale Cengage

ISBN: 9780810377882

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 721

View: 664

Race and Reunion

Author: David W. BLIGHT

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 526

View: 8967

No historical event has left as deep an imprint on America's collective memory as the Civil War. In the war's aftermath, Americans had to embrace and cast off a traumatic past. David Blight explores the perilous path of remembering and forgetting, and reveals its tragic costs to race relations and America's national reunion.