The South and America Since World War II

Author: James C. Cobb

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195166515

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 5275

With The South and America Since World War II, author James C. Cobb provides the first truly comprehensive history of the South since World War II. He brilliantly captures an era of dramatic change, both in the South and in its relationship with the rest of the nation. In this sweeping narrative, Cobb covers such diverse topics as "Dixiecrats," the "southern strategy," the South's domination of today's GOP, immigration, the national ascendance of southern culture and music, and the roles of women and an increasingly visible gay population in contemporary southern life. Beginning with the early stages of the civil rights struggle, Cobb discusses how the attack on Pearl Harbor set the stage for the demise of Jim Crow. He examines the NAACP's postwar assault on the South's racial system, the famous bus boycott in Montgomery, the emergence of Rev. Martin Luther King in the movement, and the dramatic protests and confrontations that finally brought profound racial changes, and two-party politics to the South. Cobb writes with wit and grace, showing a thorough grasp of his native region. Exhaustively researched and brimming with original insights, The South and America Since World War II offers the definitive history of the postwar South and its changing role in national life.

Into the Pulpit

Southern Baptist Women and Power Since World War II

Author: Elizabeth H. Flowers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080783534X

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 9277

Into the Pulpit

The Unfinished Journey

America Since World War II

Author: William Henry Chafe

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195150490

Category: History

Page: 596

View: 7203

This popular classic text chronicles America's roller-coaster journey through the decades since World War II. Considering both the paradoxes and the possibilities of post-war America, Chafe portrays the significant cultural and political themes that have colored our country's past and present, including issues of race, class, gender, foreign policy, and economic and social reform. He examines such subjects as the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, the origins and the end of the Cold War, the culture of the 1970s, the Reagan years, the Clinton presidency, and the events of September 11th and their aftermath. In this edition, Chafe provides an insightful assessment of Clinton's legacy as president, particularly in light of his impeachment, and an entirely new chapter that examines the impact of two of America's most pivotal events of the twenty-first century: the 2000 presidential election turmoil and the September 11th terrorist attacks. Chafe puts forth an excellent account of George W. Bush's first year as president and also covers his subsequent role as a world leader following his administration's declared war on terrorism. The completely revised epilogue and updated bibliographic essay offer a compelling and controversial final commentary on America's past and its future. Brilliantly written by a prize-winning historian, the fifth edition of The Unfinished Journey is an essential text for all students of recent American history.

Fighting Against the Odds

A History of Southern Labor Since World War II

Author: Timothy J. Minchin,John David Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813029795

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 3930

"Drawing on a broad knowledge of primary sources and his own extensive archive of more than two hundred interviews with southern workers, Minchin offers an overview of the past seventy years of southern labor history in combination with a lively and intimate sense of the human experience. His oral histories include men and women, both black and white, who offer their insights not just on the workplace but also on their living conditions, political activities, and race relations."--Jacket.

Marching in Step

Masculinity, Citizenship, and the Citadel in Post-World War II America

Author: Alexander Macaulay

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820338214

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 9354

Combining the nuanced perspective of an insider with the critical distance of a historian, Alexander Macaulay examines The Citadel’s reactions to major shifts in postwar life, from the rise of the counterculture to the demise of the Cold War. The Citadel is widely considered one of the most traditional institutions in America and a bastion of southern conservatism. In Marching in Step Macaulay argues that The Citadel has actually experienced many changes since World War II—changes that often tell us as much about the United States as about the American South. Macaulay explores how The Citadel was often an undiluted showcase for national debates over who deserved full recognition as a citizen—most famously first for black men and later for women. As the boundaries regarding race, gender, and citizenship were drawn and redrawn, Macaulay says, attitudes at The Citadel reflected rather than stood apart from those of mainstream America. In this study of an iconic American institution, Macaulay also raises questions over issues of southern distinctiveness and sheds light on the South’s real and imagined relationship with the rest of America.

The Improbable Era

The South Since World War II

Author: Charles P. Roland

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813146194

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 9196

In this concise yet comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and crisply written study, The Improbable Era places developments over the last three decades in Southern economics, politics, education, religion, the arts, and racial revolution into a disciplined framework that brings a measure of order to the perplexing chaos of this era of fundamental change in Southern life.

American Foreign Policy Since WWII 19th Edition

Author: Steven W. Hook,John Spainer

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 1452226717

Category: Political Science

Page: 423

View: 4715

The classic text on American foreign policy, Hook and Spanier's book has long set the standard in guiding students through the complexities of the field. Giving students the historical context they need, the book allows them to truly grasp the functions and frequent dysfunctions of the nation's foreign policy agenda.

Killing Hope

US Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II

Author: William Blum

Publisher: Zed Books

ISBN: 9781842773697

Category: Intervention (International law)

Page: 469

View: 7429

Is the United States a force for democracy? From China in the 1940s to Guatemala today, William Blum presents a comprehensive study of American covert and overt interference, by one means or another, in the internal affairs of other countries. Each chapter of the book covers a year in which the author takes one particular country case and tells the story - and each case throws light on particular US tactics of intervention.

Redefining Southern Culture

Mind and Identity in the Modern South

Author: James Charles Cobb

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820321394

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 1876

Cobb, "surveys the remarkable story of southern identity and its persistence in the face of sweeping changes in the South's economy, society and political structure."--dust jacket.

Empires at War

A Short History of Modern Asia Since World War II

Author: Francis Pike

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857730290

Category: History

Page: 896

View: 9617

Asia - with four billion people, almost two-thirds of the world’s population, a huge landmass and the fastest-growing economies - has in the past decade transformed the geopolitical global balance. Empires at War gives a dramatic narrative account of how this ‘Modern Asia’ came into being. Taking the bombing of Hiroshima on 6th August 1945 as its starting point, Francis Pike chronicles the modern fortunes of fourteen Asian countries. The iconic figures of post-World War II Asia - Mao, Gandhi, Nehru, Ho Chi Minh, Kim Il Sung, General MacArthur and Lord Mountbatten - figure prominently but so also do a great many lesser-known but pivotal figures. Francis Pike weaves the dramatic events and episodes of the region - the great battles between American and Soviet-backed forces in Korea and Vietnam but also episodes such as Indian ‘Partition’, Japan’s ‘Lost Decade’, Indonesia’s ‘Year of Living Dangerously’ and Cambodia’s ‘Killing Fields’ - into a coherent whole, which forms the essential guide to the history of modern Asia.

Race and Renaissance

African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II

Author: Joe W. Trotter,Jared N. Day

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 0822977559

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8704

African Americans from Pittsburgh have a long and distinctive history of contributions to the cultural, political, and social evolution of the United States. From jazz legend Earl Fatha Hines to playwright August Wilson, from labor protests in the 1950s to the Black Power movement of the late 1960s, Pittsburgh has been a force for change in American race and class relations. Race and Renaissance presents the first history of African American life in Pittsburgh after World War II. It examines the origins and significance of the second Great Migration, the persistence of Jim Crow into the postwar years, the second ghetto, the contemporary urban crisis, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and the Million Man and Million Woman marches, among other topics. In recreating this period, Trotter and Day draw not only from newspaper articles and other primary and secondary sources, but also from oral histories. These include interviews with African Americans who lived in Pittsburgh during the postwar era, uncovering firsthand accounts of what life was truly like during this transformative epoch in urban history. In these ways, Race and Renaissance illuminateshow African Americans arrived at their present moment in history. It also links movements for change to larger global issues: civil rights with the Vietnam War; affirmative action with the movement against South African apartheid. As such, the study draws on both sociology and urban studies to deepen our understanding of the lives of urban blacks.

The Violent American Century

War and Terror Since World War II

Author: John W. Dower

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608467260

Category: Political Science

Page: 150

View: 7302

World War II marked the apogee of industrialized “total war.” Great powers savaged one another. Hostilities engulfed the globe. Mobilization extended to virtually every sector of every nation. Air war, including the terror bombing of civilians, emerged as a central strategy of the victorious Anglo-American powers. The devastation was catastrophic almost everywhere, with the notable exception of the United States, which exited the strife unscathed and unmatched in power and influence. The death toll of fighting forces plus civilians worldwide was staggering. The Violent “American Century” addresses the U.S.-led transformations in war conduct and strategizing that followed 1945—beginning with brutal localized hostilities, proxy wars, and the nuclear terror of the Cold War, and ending with the asymmetrical conflicts of the present day. The military playbook now meshes brute force with a focus on non-state terrorism, counterinsurgency, clandestine operations, a vast web of overseas American military bases, and—most touted of all—a revolutionary new era of computerized “precision” warfare. By contrast to World War II, postwar death and destruction has been comparatively small. By any other measure, it has been appalling—and shows no sign of abating. The winner of numerous national prizes for his historical writings, including the Pulitzer and the National Book Award, Dower draws heavily on hard data and internal U.S. planning and pronouncements in this concise analysis of war and terror in our time. In doing so, he places U.S. policy and practice firmly within the broader context of global mayhem, havoc, and slaughter since World War II—always with bottom-line attentiveness to the human costs of this legacy of unceasing violence.

France During World War Two

Author: Thomas Rodney Christofferson,Michael Scott Christofferson

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823225623

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 5001

This title provides an introduction to almost every aspect of the French experience during World War II by integrating political, diplomatic, military, social, cultural and economic history. It chronicles the battles and campaigns that stained French soil with blood.

Mama Learned Us to Work

Farm Women in the New South

Author: Lu Ann Jones

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080786207X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9186

Farm women of the twentieth-century South have been portrayed as oppressed, worn out, and isolated. Lu Ann Jones tells quite a different story in Mama Learned Us to Work. Building upon evocative oral histories, she encourages us to understand these women as consumers, producers, and agents of economic and cultural change. As consumers, farm women bargained with peddlers at their backdoors. A key business for many farm women was the "butter and egg trade--small-scale dairying and raising chickens. Their earnings provided a crucial margin of economic safety for many families during the 1920s and 1930s and offered women some independence from their men folks. These innovative women showed that poultry production paid off and laid the foundation for the agribusiness poultry industry that emerged after World War II. Jones also examines the relationships between farm women and home demonstration agents and the effect of government-sponsored rural reform. She discusses the professional culture that developed among white agents as they reconciled new and old ideas about women's roles and shows that black agents, despite prejudice, linked their clients to valuable government resources and gave new meanings to traditions of self-help, mutual aid, and racial uplift.

Rightlessness

Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II

Author: A. Naomi Paik

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469626322

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 2774

In this bold book, A. Naomi Paik grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Rightless people thus expose an essential paradox: while the United States purports to champion inalienable rights at home and internationally, it has built its global power in part by creating a regime of imprisonment that places certain populations perceived as threats beyond rights. The United States' status as the guardian of rights coincides with, indeed depends on, its creation of rightlessness. Yet rightless people are not silent. Drawing from an expansive testimonial archive of legal proceedings, truth commission records, poetry, and experimental video, Paik shows how rightless people use their imprisonment to protest U.S. state violence. She examines demands for redress by Japanese Americans interned during World War II, testimonies of HIV-positive Haitian refugees detained at Guantanamo in the early 1990s, and appeals by Guantanamo's enemy combatants from the War on Terror. In doing so, she reveals a powerful ongoing contest over the nature and meaning of the law, over civil liberties and global human rights, and over the power of the state in people's lives.

Slavery by Another Name

The re-enslavement of black americans from the civil war to World War Two

Author: Douglas A. Blackmon

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN: 1848314132

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 6071

A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

The World Is A Ghetto

Race And Democracy Since World War II

Author: Howard Winant

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780465043415

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 7040

The World Is a Ghetto compares post-World War II racial dynamics in four countries or regions: the United States, South Africa, Brazil, and the European Union. Howard Winant argues that race remains crucial both for contemporary politics and for concepts of identity and culture. By investigating how economic development, labor processes, the ideals of democracy and popular sovereignty, patterns of social stratification, and even concepts of social and individual identity have been affected by the role race has played in the modern global democracy, Winant provides a new critique of racial exclusion and inequality.An invaluable tool for understanding the role of race in contemporary global politics, The World Is a Ghetto provides a sobering history of the real successes of movements for racial justice and democracy both in the U.S. and globally.

African American Urban History since World War II

Author: Kenneth L. Kusmer,Joe W. Trotter

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226465128

Category: Social Science

Page: 552

View: 1428

Historians have devoted surprisingly little attention to African American urban history ofthe postwar period, especially compared with earlier decades. Correcting this imbalance, African American Urban History since World War II features an exciting mix of seasoned scholars and fresh new voices whose combined efforts provide the first comprehensive assessment of this important subject. The first of this volume’s five groundbreaking sections focuses on black migration and Latino immigration, examining tensions and alliances that emerged between African Americans and other groups. Exploring the challenges of residential segregation and deindustrialization, later sections tackle such topics as the real estate industry’s discriminatory practices, the movement of middle-class blacks to the suburbs, and the influence of black urban activists on national employment and social welfare policies. Another group of contributors examines these themes through the lens of gender, chronicling deindustrialization’s disproportionate impact on women and women’s leading roles in movements for social change. Concluding with a set of essays on black culture and consumption, this volume fully realizes its goal of linking local transformations with the national and global processes that affect urban class and race relations.