The Strange Career of the Black Athlete

African Americans and Sports

Author: Russell Thomas Wigginton

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275982232

Category: Social Science

Page: 123

View: 1279

The Vietnam Readeris a selection of the finest and best-known art from the American war in Vietnam, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film, still photos, and popular song lyrics. All the strongest work is here, from mainstream bestsellers to radical poetry, from Tim O'Brien to Marvin Gaye. Also included are incisive reader's questions--useful for educators and book clubs--in a volume that makes an essential contribution to a wider understanding of the Vietnam War. This authoritative and accessible volume is sure to become a classic reference, as well as indispensable and provocative reading for anyone who wants to know more about the war that changed the face of late-twentieth-century America. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Out of the Shadows

A Biographical History of African American Athletes

Author: David K. Wiggins

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781610752954

Category: Social Science

Page: 459

View: 2456

The original essays in this comprehensive collection examine the lives and sports of famous and not-so-famous African American male and female athletes from the nineteenth century to today. Here are twenty insightful biographies that furnish perspectives on the changing status of these athletes and how these changes mirrored the transformation of sports, American society, and civil rights legislation. Some of the athletes discussed include Marshall Taylor (bicycling), William Henry Lewis (football), Jack Johnson, Satchel Paige, Jesse Owens, Joe Lewis, Alice Coachman (track and field), Althea Gibson (tennis), Wilma Rudolph, Bill Russell, Jim Brown, Arthur Ashe, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, and Venus and Serena Williams.

Integrating the 40 Acres

The Fifty-Year Struggle for Racial Equality at the University of Texas

Author: Dwonna Goldstone

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820340855

Category: History

Page: 213

View: 3156

You name it, we can't do it. That was how one African American student at the University of Texas at Austin summed up his experiences in a 1960 newspaper article--some ten years after the beginning of court-mandated desegregation at the school. In this first full-length history of the university's desegregation, Dwonna Goldstone examines how, for decades, administrators only gradually undid the most visible signs of formal segregation while putting their greatest efforts into preventing true racial integration. In response to the 1956 Board of Regents decision to admit African American undergraduates, for example, the dean of students and the director of the student activities center stopped scheduling dances to prevent racial intermingling in a social setting. Goldstone's coverage ranges from the 1950 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the University of Texas School of Law had to admit Heman Sweatt, an African American, through the 1994 Hopwood v. Texas decision, which ended affirmative action in the state's public institutions of higher education. She draws on oral histories, university documents, and newspaper accounts to detail how the university moved from open discrimination to foot-dragging acceptance to mixed successes in the integration of athletics, classrooms, dormitories, extracurricular activities, and student recruitment. Goldstone incorporates not only the perspectives of university administrators, students, alumni, and donors, but also voices from all sides of the civil rights movement at the local and national level. This instructive story of power, race, money, and politics remains relevant to the modern university and the continuing question about what it means to be integrated.

Diversity and Social Justice in College Sports

Sport Management and the Student Athlete

Author: Dana D. Brooks,Ronald C. Althouse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781885693778

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 431

View: 9553

Each of the well-researched chapters in this comprehensive volume makes a singular contribution to understanding the complexities of diversity and social justice in college sports. Chapters are grouped into sections that address major components: Historical Analysis; Social Justice and Cultural Concerns; African American Coaching and Other Leadership Opportunities; Media, Media Images, and Stereotyping; Intersection of Race, Sport, and Law; Sport Administration/Management: Intersection of Race, Class, and Gender; Looking Toward the Future. This volume makes a valuable contribution to the literature on American sports.

Racism in College Athletics

The African American Athlete's Experience

Author: Dana D. Brooks,Ronald C. Althouse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781885693198

Category: Social Science

Page: 323

View: 4000

The completely revised and updated second edition features new groundbreaking articles from leading scholars. Included are 'The African American Athlete: Social Myths & Stereotypes', 'Sociohistorical Influences on African American Elite Sportswomen' and 'Race Law and College Athletics.' Also included are updated and revised versions of articles from the first edition which pioneered the study of racism in college athletics.

Urban Nightlife

Entertaining Race, Class, and Culture in Public Space

Author: Reuben A. Buford May

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813575680

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 7267

Sociologists have long been curious about the ways in which city dwellers negotiate urban public space. How do they manage myriad interactions in the shared spaces of the city? In Urban Nightlife, sociologist Reuben May undertakes a nuanced examination of urban nightlife, drawing on ethnographic data gathered in a Deep South college town to explore the question of how nighttime revelers negotiate urban public spaces as they go about meeting, socializing, and entertaining themselves. May’s work reveals how diverse partiers define these spaces, in particular the ongoing social conflict on the streets, in bars and nightclubs, and in the various public spaces of downtown. To explore this conflict, May develops the concept of “integrated segregation”—the idea that diverse groups are physically close to one another yet rarely have meaningful interactions—rather, they are socially bound to those of similar race, class, and cultural backgrounds. May’s in-depth research leads him to conclude that social tension is stubbornly persistent in part because many participants fail to make the connection between contemporary relations among different groups and the historical and institutional forces that perpetuate those very tensions; structural racism remains obscured by a superficial appearance of racial harmony. Through May’s observations, Urban Nightlife clarifies the complexities of race, class, and culture in contemporary America, illustrating the direct influence of local government and nightclub management decision-making on interpersonal interaction among groups. Watch a video with Reuben A. Buford May: Watch video now. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCs1xExStPw).

Buyer's Guide

1999-2000

Author: William White

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Library science

Page: N.A

View: 749

Library Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Libraries

Page: N.A

View: 7971

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.

When to Stop the Cheering?

The Black Press, the Black Community, and the Integration of Professional Baseball

Author: Brian Carroll

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113586361X

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 2807

*Finalist for the 2007 Seymour Medal of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR).* *Winner of the 2007 Robert Peterson Book Award of the Negro Leagues Committee of the Society for American Baseball* When to Stop the Cheering? documents the close and often conflicted relationship between the black press and black baseball beginning with the first Negro professional league of substance, the Negro National League, which started in 1920, and finishing with the dissolution of the Negro American League in 1957. When to Stop the Cheering? examines the multidimensional relationship the black newspapers had with baseball, including their treatment of and relationships with baseball officials, team owners, players and fans. Over time, these relationships changed, resulting in shifts in coverage that could be described as moving from brotherhood to paternalism, then from paternalism to nostalgic tribute and even regret.

Race and Sport

The Struggle for Equality on and Off the Field

Author: Charles K. Ross

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781578068975

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 2908

An examination of the connection between race and sport in America

Black American Biographies

The Journey of Achievement

Author: Jeff Wallenfeldt Manager, Geography and History

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 1615301372

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 408

View: 3858

Profiles notable African Americans from abolitionists and activists to popular artists and politicians.

The First Black Boxing Champions

Essays on Fighters of the 1800s to the 1920s

Author: Colleen Aycock,Mark Scott

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786461888

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 302

View: 2819

This volume presents fifteen chapters of biography of African American and black champions and challengers of the early prize ring. They range from Tom Molineaux, a slave who won freedom and fame in the ring in the early 1800s; to Joe Gans, the first African American world champion; to the flamboyant Jack Johnson, deemed such a threat to white society that film of his defeat of former champion and “Great White Hope” Jim Jeffries was banned across much of the country. Photographs, period drawings, cartoons, and fight posters enhance the biographies. Round-by-round coverage of select historic fights is included, as is a foreword by Hall-of-Fame boxing announcer Al Bernstein.

Welcome to the Terrordome

The Pain, Politics and Promise of Sports

Author: Dave Zirin

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608460002

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 264

View: 3864

“Dave Zirin is the best young sportswriter in America.”—Robert Lipsyte This much-anticipated sequel to What’s My Name, Fool? by acclaimed commentator Dave Zirin breaks new ground in sports writing, looking at the controversies and trends now shaping sports in the United States—and abroad. Features chapters such as “Barry Bonds is Gonna Git Your Mama: The Last Word on Steroids,” “Pro Basketball and the Two Souls of Hip-Hop,” “An Icon’s Redemption: The Great Roberto Clemente,” and “Beisbol: How the Major Leagues Eat Their Young.” Zirin’s commentary is always insightful, never predictable. Dave Zirin is the author of the widely acclaimed book What’s My Name, Fool? (Haymarket Books) and writes the weekly column “Edge of Sports” (edgeofsports.com). He writes a regular column for The Nation and Slam magazine and has appeared as a sports commentator on ESPN TV and radio, CBNC, WNBC, Democracy Now!, Air America, Radio Nation, and Pacifica. Chuck D redefined rap music and hip-hop culture as leader and co-founder of the legendary rap group Public Enemy. Spike Lee calls him “one of the most politically and socially conscious artists of any generation.” He co-hosts a weekly radio show on Air America.

Benching Jim Crow

the rise and fall of the color line in southern college sports, 1890-1980

Author: Charles H. Martin

Publisher: Univ of Illinois Pr

ISBN: 9780252035517

Category: Education

Page: 374

View: 4258

Since the late nineteenth century, college athletics have mattered enormously to southern white males, whether they were students, alumni, or sports fans who never set foot inside a college classroom. Football especially came to inspire passions and state pride. Colleges and universities in the South sought to prove that they were the equal of teams anywhere in the country, but equality was strictly limited. While Southern football and basketball teams aspired to national fame, the South was enforcing ever stricter segregation. Black players, no matter how talented, could not play. When teams from other parts of the country allowed blacks to play, Southern teams refused to play them or required them to bench their black players for their games, or when confronted by campus resistance after World War II, refused to play them at home. Examining the history of college football and basketball during the Jim Crow era, this volume shows how racial discrimination was enforced in the South and how teams in the North were long compliant with it. Martin reveals how dozens of northern universities themselves excluded black players from their own teams well into the 1940s. He then traces the long, slow change that led to integrated competition, the recruitment of black players, and the hiring of black coaches. Changes came from several sides and did not come easily. One incentive for change turned out to be athletic competition: when teams from smaller schools with black players began to defeat all-white teams from the South With special attention to the Southeastern Conference, the Atlantic Coast Conference, and teams in Texas, Martin shows the gradual disappearance of Jim Crow segregation in the colleges of the South. More than a study of how segregation affected college football and basketball, it shows how college sports helped bring down Jim Crow.

The Color of Water

Author: James McBride

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440636103

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 6592

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Good Lord Bird, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction, Five-Carat Soul, and Kill 'Em and Leave, a James Brown biography. The incredible modern classic that Oprah.com calls one of the best memoirs of a generation and launched James McBride’s literary career. Over two years on The New York Times bestseller list Who is Ruth McBride Jordan? A self-declared "light-skinned" woman evasive about her ethnicity, yet steadfast in her love for her twelve black children. James McBride, journalist, musician, and son, explores his mother's past, as well as his own upbringing and heritage, in a poignant and powerful debut, The Color Of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother. The son of a black minister and a woman who would not admit she was white, James McBride grew up in "orchestrated chaos" with his eleven siblings in the poor, all-black projects of Red Hook, Brooklyn. "Mommy," a fiercely protective woman with "dark eyes full of pep and fire," herded her brood to Manhattan's free cultural events, sent them off on buses to the best (and mainly Jewish) schools, demanded good grades, and commanded respect. As a young man, McBride saw his mother as a source of embarrassment, worry, and confusion—and reached thirty before he began to discover the truth about her early life and long-buried pain. In The Color of Water, McBride retraces his mother's footsteps and, through her searing and spirited voice, recreates her remarkable story. The daughter of a failed itinerant Orthodox rabbi, she was born Rachel Shilsky (actually Ruchel Dwara Zylska) in Poland on April 1, 1921. Fleeing pogroms, her family emigrated to America and ultimately settled in Suffolk, Virginia, a small town where anti-Semitism and racial tensions ran high. With candor and immediacy, Ruth describes her parents' loveless marriage; her fragile, handicapped mother; her cruel, sexually-abusive father; and the rest of the family and life she abandoned. At seventeen, after fleeing Virginia and settling in New York City, Ruth married a black minister and founded the all- black New Brown Memorial Baptist Church in her Red Hook living room. "God is the color of water," Ruth McBride taught her children, firmly convinced that life's blessings and life's values transcend race. Twice widowed, and continually confronting overwhelming adversity and racism, Ruth's determination, drive and discipline saw her dozen children through college—and most through graduate school. At age 65, she herself received a degree in social work from Temple University. Interspersed throughout his mother's compelling narrative, McBride shares candid recollections of his own experiences as a mixed-race child of poverty, his flirtations with drugs and violence, and his eventual self- realization and professional success. The Color of Water touches readers of all colors as a vivid portrait of growing up, a haunting meditation on race and identity, and a lyrical valentine to a mother from her son.

The Color of Crime

Author: Katheryn Russell-Brown

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814776179

Category: Social Science

Page: 213

View: 8691

America is the most punitive nation in the world, incarcerating more than 2.3 million people—or one in 136 of its residents. Against the backdrop of this unprecedented mass imprisonment, punishment permeates everyday life, carrying with it complex cultural meanings. In The Culture of Punishment, Michelle Brown goes beyond prison gates and into the routine and popular engagements of everyday life, showing that those of us most distanced from the practice of punishment tend to be particularly harsh in our judgments. The Culture of Punishment takes readers on a tour of the sites where culture and punishment meet—television shows, movies, prison tourism, and post 9/11 new war prisons—demonstrating that because incarceration affects people along distinct race and class lines, it is only a privileged group of citizens who are removed from the experience of incarceration. These penal spectators, who often sanction the infliction of pain from a distance, risk overlooking the reasons for democratic oversight of the project of punishment and, more broadly, justifications for the prohibition of pain.

Ain't But a Place

An Anthology of African American Writings about St. Louis

Author: Gerald Lyn Early

Publisher: Missouri History Museum

ISBN: 9781883982287

Category: History

Page: 515

View: 4708

Gerald Early writes in the introduction to "Ain't But a Place": An Anthology of African American Writings about St. Louis, "An impressive amount of artistic energy is generated in St. Louis, and the source of a good deal of that energy is its African American citizenry." Although the majority of writers and entertainers left St. Louis "to engage their muse and quarrel with American culture from another location," the experience gained from the St. Louis region has remained prominent in the expressions. "Ain't But a Place" captures voices that comprise the African American experience in St. Louis over the past two hundred years. This rich collection spans a variety of genres to include the words of such notables as freed slaves and abolitionists William Wells Brown and Lucy Delaney, sports greats Bob Gibson, Henry Armstrong, and Jackie Joyner Kersee; entertainers Dick Gregory, Miles Davis, Chuck Berry, and Tina Turner; and writers Eddy Harris, Ntozake Shange, Quincy Troupe, and Eugene Redmond. "Ain't But a Place" makes ideal reading for the student of African American culture, as well as anyone interested in the formative experiences of some of this regions most influential individuals.

The Original Amos ’n’ Andy

Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll and the 1928–1943 Radio Serial

Author: Elizabeth McLeod

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476609713

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 223

View: 8135

This critical reexamination of Amos ’n’ Andy, the pioneering creation of Charles Correll and Freeman Gosden, presents an unapologetic but balanced view lacking in most treatments. It relies upon an untapped resource—thousands of pages of scripts from the show’s nearly forgotten earliest version, which most clearly reflected the vision of its creators. Consequently, it provides fresh insights and in part refutes the usual blanket condemnations of this groundbreaking show. The text incorporates numerous script excerpts, provides key background information, and also acknowledges the show’s importance to radio broadcasting and modern entertainment.

The National Pastime: A Review of Baseball History

Premiere Issue Digital Re-Issue

Author: Edited by John Thorn

Publisher: SABR, Inc.

ISBN: 1933599812

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 92

View: 8777

Back in 1982, the Society for American Baseball Research was still young, barely a decade past its founding, and had grown to some 1600 members. One of their number, a "defrocked English Lit guy poking around in journalism," suggested to the board of directors that SABR, and the world, might benefit from a publication along the lines of American Heritage, only about baseball. Before long that member, John Thorn, found himself at the helm of the newly christened periodical, The National Pastime: A Review of Baseball History. The very first issue included names we think of today as luminaries in the field of baseball history and analysis: Harold Seymour, Lawrence S. Ritter, Pete Palmer, David Voigt, Bob Broeg, and more. Over the years the significance of that flagship issue has only grown, while the inventory has dwindled. SABR is pleased to present a replica edition here, with the addition of a new preface by John Thorn, now the official historian of Major League Baseball. This issue includes: Nate Colbert's Unknown RBI Record by Bob Carroll Nineteenth-Century Baseball Deserves Equal Time by Art Ahrens Dandy at Third: Ray Dandridge by John B. Holway How Fast Was Cool Papa Bell? by Jim Bankes The Field of Play by David Sanders Ladies and Gentlemen, Presenting Marty McHale by Lawrence S. Ritter Remembrance of Summers Past by Bob Broeg The Merkle Blunder: A Kaleidoscopic View by G. H. Fleming A Tale of Two Sluggers: Roger Maris and Hack Wilson, by Don Nelson Baseball's Misbegottens: Expansion Era Managers by David Voigt The Early Years: A Gallery by Mark Rucker and Lew Lipset The Egyptian and the Greyhounds by Lew Lipset All the Record Books Are Wrong by Frank J. Williams Goose Goslin's Induction Day by Lawrence S. Ritter The Great New York Team of 1927—and It Wasn't the Yankees by Fred Stein Modern Times: A Portfolio by Stuart Leeds Books Before Baseball: A Personal History by Harold Seymour, Ph.D. Ballparks: A Quiz by Bob Bluthardt Runs and Wins by Pete Palmer Baltimore, the Eastern Shore, and More by Al Kermisch David and Goliath: Figures by Ted DiTullio Double Joe Dwyer: A Life in the Bushes by Gerald Tomlinson