The Strange Career of the Black Athlete

African Americans and Sports

Author: Russell Thomas Wigginton

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275982232

Category: Social Science

Page: 123

View: 5513

The Vietnam Readeris a selection of the finest and best-known art from the American war in Vietnam, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film, still photos, and popular song lyrics. All the strongest work is here, from mainstream bestsellers to radical poetry, from Tim O'Brien to Marvin Gaye. Also included are incisive reader's questions--useful for educators and book clubs--in a volume that makes an essential contribution to a wider understanding of the Vietnam War. This authoritative and accessible volume is sure to become a classic reference, as well as indispensable and provocative reading for anyone who wants to know more about the war that changed the face of late-twentieth-century America. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Out of the Shadows

A Biographical History of African American Athletes

Author: David K. Wiggins

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781610752954

Category: GAMES

Page: 459

View: 4945

The original essays in this comprehensive collection examine the lives and sports of famous and not-so-famous African American male and female athletes from the nineteenth century to today. Here are twenty insightful biographies that furnish perspectives on the changing status of these athletes and how these changes mirrored the transformation of sports, American society, and civil rights legislation. Some of the athletes discussed include Marshall Taylor (bicycling), William Henry Lewis (football), Jack Johnson, Satchel Paige, Jesse Owens, Joe Lewis, Alice Coachman (track and field), Althea Gibson (tennis), Wilma Rudolph, Bill Russell, Jim Brown, Arthur Ashe, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, and Venus and Serena Williams.

Say it Loud

An Illustrated History of the Black Athlete

Author: Roxanne Jones,Jessie Paolucci

Publisher: Espn Books

ISBN: 0345515897

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 2849

Presents a tribute to the accomplishments of African American athletes who risked their well-being to promote social and legal changes, and includes coverage of such figures as Jesse Owens, Arthur Ashe, and Jackie Robinson.

Nigger

The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word

Author: Randall Kennedy

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307538915

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 4726

It’s “the nuclear bomb of racial epithets,” a word that whites have employed to wound and degrade African Americans for three centuries. Paradoxically, among many black people it has become a term of affection and even empowerment. The word, of course, is nigger, and in this candid, lucidly argued book the distinguished legal scholar Randall Kennedy traces its origins, maps its multifarious connotations, and explores the controversies that rage around it. Should blacks be able to use nigger in ways forbidden to others? Should the law treat it as a provocation that reduces the culpability of those who respond to it violently? Should it cost a person his job, or a book like Huckleberry Finn its place on library shelves? With a range of reference that extends from the Jim Crow south to Chris Rock routines and the O. J. Simpson trial, Kennedy takes on not just a word, but our laws, attitudes, and culture with bracing courage and intelligence.

Taboo

Why Black Athletes Dominate Sports And Why We're Afraid To Talk About It

Author: Jon Entine

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 0786724501

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 352

View: 7966

In virtually every sport in which they are given opportunity to compete, people of African descent dominate. East Africans own every distance running record. Professional sports in the Americas are dominated by men and women of West African descent. Why have blacks come to dominate sports? Are they somehow physically better? And why are we so uncomfortable when we discuss this? Drawing on the latest scientific research, journalist Jon Entine makes an irrefutable case for black athletic superiority. We learn how scientists have used numerous, bogus "scientific" methods to prove that blacks were either more or less superior physically, and how racist scientists have often equated physical prowess with intellectual deficiency. Entine recalls the long, hard road to integration, both on the field and in society. And he shows why it isn't just being black that matters—it makes a huge difference as to where in Africa your ancestors are from.Equal parts sports, science and examination of why this topic is so sensitive, Taboois a book that will spark national debate.

The Black Bruins

The Remarkable Lives of UCLA’s Jackie Robinson, Woody Strode, Tom Bradley, Kenny Washington, and Ray Bartlett

Author: James W. Johnson

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 1496201833

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3105

"The intertwined story of five influential African American athletes who came together as teammates at UCLA in the 1930s" --

Madison Avenue and the Color Line

African Americans in the Advertising Industry

Author: Jason Chambers

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812203852

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 4948

Until now, most works on the history of African Americans in advertising have focused on the depiction of blacks in advertisements. As the first comprehensive examination of African American participation in the industry, Madison Avenue and the Color Line breaks new ground by examining the history of black advertising employees and agency owners. For much of the twentieth century, even as advertisers chased African American consumer dollars, the doors to most advertising agencies were firmly closed to African American professionals. Over time, black participation in the industry resulted from the combined efforts of black media, civil rights groups, black consumers, government organizations, and black advertising and marketing professionals working outside white agencies. Blacks positioned themselves for jobs within the advertising industry, especially as experts on the black consumer market, and then used their status to alter stereotypical perceptions of black consumers. By doing so, they became part of the broader effort to build an African American professional and entrepreneurial class and to challenge the negative portrayals of blacks in American culture. Using an extensive review of advertising trade journals, government documents, and organizational papers, as well as personal interviews and the advertisements themselves, Jason Chambers weaves individual biographies together with broader events in U.S. history to tell how blacks struggled to bring equality to the advertising industry.

Fighting Their Own Battles

Mexican Americans, African Americans, and the Struggle for Civil Rights in Texas

Author: Brian D. Behnken

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807834785

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 6316

Between 1940 and 1975, African Americans and Mexican Americans in Texas fought a number of battles in court, at the ballot box, in schools, and on the streets to eliminate segregation and state-imposed racism. Although both groups engaged in civil rights

Integrating the 40 Acres

The Fifty-Year Struggle for Racial Equality at the University of Texas

Author: Dwonna Goldstone

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820340855

Category: History

Page: 213

View: 2003

You name it, we can't do it. That was how one African American student at the University of Texas at Austin summed up his experiences in a 1960 newspaper article--some ten years after the beginning of court-mandated desegregation at the school. In this first full-length history of the university's desegregation, Dwonna Goldstone examines how, for decades, administrators only gradually undid the most visible signs of formal segregation while putting their greatest efforts into preventing true racial integration. In response to the 1956 Board of Regents decision to admit African American undergraduates, for example, the dean of students and the director of the student activities center stopped scheduling dances to prevent racial intermingling in a social setting. Goldstone's coverage ranges from the 1950 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the University of Texas School of Law had to admit Heman Sweatt, an African American, through the 1994 Hopwood v. Texas decision, which ended affirmative action in the state's public institutions of higher education. She draws on oral histories, university documents, and newspaper accounts to detail how the university moved from open discrimination to foot-dragging acceptance to mixed successes in the integration of athletics, classrooms, dormitories, extracurricular activities, and student recruitment. Goldstone incorporates not only the perspectives of university administrators, students, alumni, and donors, but also voices from all sides of the civil rights movement at the local and national level. This instructive story of power, race, money, and politics remains relevant to the modern university and the continuing question about what it means to be integrated.

Diversity and Social Justice in College Sports

Sport Management and the Student Athlete

Author: Dana D. Brooks,Ronald C. Althouse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781885693778

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 431

View: 7530

Each of the well-researched chapters in this comprehensive volume makes a singular contribution to understanding the complexities of diversity and social justice in college sports. Chapters are grouped into sections that address major components: Historical Analysis; Social Justice and Cultural Concerns; African American Coaching and Other Leadership Opportunities; Media, Media Images, and Stereotyping; Intersection of Race, Sport, and Law; Sport Administration/Management: Intersection of Race, Class, and Gender; Looking Toward the Future. This volume makes a valuable contribution to the literature on American sports.

To Ask for an Equal Chance

African Americans in the Great Depression

Author: Cheryl Lynn Greenberg

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781442200517

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 1052

The Great Depression hit Americans hard, but none harder than African Americans and the working poor. To Ask for an Equal Chance explores black experiences during this period and the intertwined challenges posed by race and class. "Last hired, first fired," black workers lost their jobs at twice the rate of whites, and faced greater obstacles in their search for economic security. Black workers, who were generally urban newcomers, impoverished and lacking industrial skills, were already at a disadvantage. These difficulties were intensified by an overt, and in the South legally entrenched, system of racial segregation and discrimination. New federal programs offered hope as they redefined government's responsibility for its citizens, but local implementation often proved racially discriminatory. As Cheryl Lynn Greenberg makes clear, African Americans were not passive victims of economic catastrophe or white racism; they responded to such challenges in a variety of political, social, and communal ways. The book explores both the external realities facing African Americans and individual and communal responses to them. While experiences varied depending on many factors including class, location, gender and community size, there are also unifying and overarching realities that applied universally. To Ask for an Equal Chance straddles the particular, with examinations of specific communities and experiences, and the general, with explorations of the broader effects of racism, discrimination, family, class, and political organizing.

For Gold and Glory

Charlie Wiggins and the African-American Racing Car Circuit

Author: Todd Gould

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253341334

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 212

View: 7194

The companion book to the PBS television special of the same name, For Gold and Glory retraces the little-known history of the Gold and Glory Sweepstakes. This highly celebrated auto-racing event for African Americans was held in Indiana and throughout the Midwest during the racial turbulence of the 1920s and 1930s, when the Ku Klux Klan cast a shadow over the social and political landscape of the state and region. The story is told through the eyes and emotions of Indianapolis auto mechanic Charlie Wiggins. The greatest African American driver of the era, Wiggins was known as the ""Negro Speed King."" In this book, Wiggins' widow, Roberta, and the drivers, families, and other eyewitnesses to the old ""Gold and Glory"" races recount vivid stories of his career, such as Charlie's unexpected run-in with the KKK in Kentucky, his outrageous stunts to help promote the black racing circuit, and his strange relationship with the notorious gunman John Dillinger. Set against the colorful backdrop of gangsters, bootleggers, the birth of jazz, and the early history of auto racing in the United States, For Gold and Glory chronicles the tragedies and triumphs of a dedicated group of individuals who overcame tremendous odds to chase their dreams. Theirs is a uniquely American story.

African American Historic Places

Author: National Register of Historic Places

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780471143451

Category: Architecture

Page: 624

View: 9133

Culled from the records of the National Register of Historic Places, a roster of all types of significant properties across the United States, African American Historic Places includes over 800 places in 42 states and two U.S. territories that have played a role in black American history. Banks, cemeteries, clubs, colleges, forts, homes, hospitals, schools, and shops are but a few of the types of sites explored in this volume, which is an invaluable reference guide for researchers, historians, preservationists, and anyone interested in African American culture. Also included are eight insightful essays on the African American experience, from migration to the role of women, from the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. The authors represent academia, museums, historic preservation, and politics, and utilize the listed properties to vividly illustrate the role of communities and women, the forces of migration, the influence of the arts and heritage preservation, and the struggles for freedom and civil rights. Together they lead to a better understanding of the contributions of African Americans to American history. They illustrate the events and people, the designs and achievements that define African American history. And they pay powerful tribute to the spirit of black America.

Buyer's Guide

1999-2000

Author: William White

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Library science

Page: N.A

View: 2608

Forgotten Readers

Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies

Author: Elizabeth McHenry

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822329954

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 423

View: 5070

DIVRecovers the history of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century African American reading societies./div

Major Taylor

The Inspiring Story of a Black Cyclist and the Men Who Helped Him Achieve Worldwide Fame

Author: Conrad Kerber,Terry Kerber

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN: 162914021X

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 2317

“Before Magic, before Ali, before Jesse Owens, there was Major Taylor” (Bob Roll, NBC cycling analyst and former professional cyclist). At the turn of the century, one of the world’s most popular athletes was a black bicycle racer named Marshall Walter “Major” Taylor. Known throughout the country, he was the fastest man in America and the first African American cyclist to achieve the level of world champion. But he still faced the virulent racism and belittling treatment that was a daily occurrence for so many. Major Taylor is the story of a truly remarkable man and athlete, from his humble beginnings in Indianapolis riding a bike and performing stunts for money to his incredible victories despite widespread discrimination—and cruelties that included having ice water thrown on him and nails tossed in his bike’s path, as well as being physically attacked during a race. With a foreword by three-time Tour de France winner Greg LeMond, this spellbinding saga of fortitude, grace, forgiveness, and one man’s unyielding will to win against the greatest of odds is sure to become a classic.

Racism in College Athletics

The African American Athlete's Experience

Author: Dana D. Brooks,Ronald C. Althouse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781885693198

Category: Social Science

Page: 323

View: 1899

The completely revised and updated second edition features new groundbreaking articles from leading scholars. Included are 'The African American Athlete: Social Myths & Stereotypes', 'Sociohistorical Influences on African American Elite Sportswomen' and 'Race Law and College Athletics.' Also included are updated and revised versions of articles from the first edition which pioneered the study of racism in college athletics.

Library Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Libraries

Page: N.A

View: 1524

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.

The Death of Black America

Author: Eran Reya

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1425989225

Category: Religion

Page: 156

View: 3057

Have you ever been so happy with the things that were happening your life you felt that you had never been to that level before? Sometimes in my life it was a promotion, a new birth, maybe it was the greatest love of life. There are just those special times when everything in life pales by comparison. It is during those moments we feel so elated that we could Touch The Sky. It is through these poems that I hope you will travel again in your memories and you will once again Touch The Sky.