The Tools of Asclepius

Surgical Instruments in Greek and Roman Times

Author: Lawrence Bliquez

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004283595

Category: Medical

Page: 476

View: 3207

In The Tools of Asclepius Lawrence Bliquez provides a comprehensive, up-to-date treatment of the surgical instruments and paraphernalia used by Greco-Roman pharmacists, physicians and surgeons.

Magic And Rationality In Ancient Near Eastern And Graeco-roman Medicine

Author: Herman F. J. Horstmanshoff,Marten Stol,C. R. Van Tilburg

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004136665

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 7714

A study of methods in Ancient Near Eastern and Greek and Roman medicine, based on representative text corpora. Central is the question of what is "rational," or not, in the various systems.

Asclepius

Collection and Interpretation of the Testimonies

Author: Emma J. Edelstein,Ludwig Edelstein

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801857690

Category: History

Page: 782

View: 3204

Throughout nearly all of antiquity, the legendary Greek physician, Asclepius, son of Apollo and Coronis, was not only the primary representative of divine healing, but also so influential in the religious life of later centuries that, as Emma J. Edelstein and Ludwig Edelstein point out, "in the final stages of paganism, of all genuinely Greek gods, [he] was judged the foremost antagonist of Christ." Providing an overview of all facets of the Asclepius phenomenon, this book, first published in two volumes in 1945, comprises a unique collection of the literary references and inscriptions in ancient texts—given in both the original and translation—to the deity, his life, his deeds, his cult, and his temples, as well as an extended analysis of them.

Soldier, Priest, and God

A Life of Alexander the Great

Author: F. S. Naiden

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190875356

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 8022

Whatever we may think of Alexander--whether Great or only lucky, a civilizer or a sociopath--most people do not regard him as a religious leader. And yet religion permeated all aspects of his career. When he used religion astutely, he and his army prospered. In Egypt, he performed the ceremonies needed to be pharaoh, and thus became a god as well as a priest. Babylon surrendered to him partly because he agreed to become a sacred king. When Alexander disregarded religion, he and his army suffered. In Iran, for instance, where he refused to be crowned and even destroyed a shrine, resistance against him mounted. In India, he killed Buddhists, Jains, and Hindus by the hundreds of thousands until his officers, men he regarded as religious companians, rebelled against him and forced him to abandon his campaign of conquest. Although he never fully recovered from this last disappointment, he continued to perform his priestly duties in the rest of his empire. As far as we know, the last time he rose from his bed was to perform a sacrifice. Ancient writers knew little about Near Eastern religions, no doubt due to the difficulty of travel to Babylon, India, and the interior of Egypt. Yet details of these exotic religions can be found in other ancient sources, including Greek, and in the last thirty years, knowledge of Alexander's time in the Near East has increased. Egyptologists and Assyriologists have written the first thorough accounts of Alexander's religious doings in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Recent archaeological work has also allowed scholars to uncover new aspects of Macedonian religious policy. Soldier, Priest, and God, the first religious biography of Alexander, incorporates this recent scholarship to provide a vivid and unique portrait of a remarkable leader.

Asklepios, Medicine, and the Politics of Healing in Fifth-Century Greece

Between Craft and Cult

Author: Bronwen L. Wickkiser

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801889782

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 1422

Delving deeply into ancient medical history, Bronwen L. Wickkiser explores the early development and later spread of the cult of Asklepios, one of the most popular healing gods in the ancient Mediterranean. Though Asklepios had been known as a healer since the time of Homer, evidence suggests that large numbers of people began to flock to the cult during the fifth century BCE, just as practitioners of Hippocratic medicine were gaining dominance. Drawing on close readings of period medical texts, literary sources, archaeological evidence, and earlier studies, Wickkiser finds two primary causes for the cult’s ascendance: it filled a gap in the market created by the refusal of Hippocratic physicians to treat difficult chronic ailments and it abetted Athenian political needs. Wickkiser supports these challenging theories with side-by-side examinations of the medical practices at Asklepios' sanctuaries and those espoused in Hippocratic medical treatises. She also explores how Athens' aspirations to empire influenced its decision to open the city to the healer-god's cult. In focusing on the fifth century and by considering the medical, political, and religious dimensions of the cult of Asklepios, Wickkiser presents a complex, nuanced picture of Asklepios' rise in popularity, Athenian society, and ancient Mediterranean culture. The intriguing and sometimes surprising information she presents will be valued by historians of medicine and classicists alike.

Medicine and Healing in the Ancient Mediterranean

Author: D. Michaelides

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782972382

Category: Medical

Page: 446

View: 6657

There are many recoverable aspects and indications concerning medicine and healing in the ancient past Ð from the archaeological evidence of skeletal remains, grave-goods comprising medical and/or surgical equipment and visual representations in tombs and other monuments thorough to epigraphic and literary sources. The 42 papers presented here cover many aspects medicine in the Mediterranean world during Antiquity and early Byzantine times, bringing together both internationally established specialists on the history of medicine and researchers in the early stages of their career. The contributions are grouped under a series of headings: medicine and archaeology; media (online access to electronic corpus); the Aegean; medical authors/schools of medicine; surgery; medicaments and cures; skeletal remains; new research in Cyprus; Asklepios and incubation; and Byzantine, Arab and medieval sources. These subject areas are addressed through a combination of wide ranging archaeological and osteological data and the examination and interpretation of philosophical, literary and historiographical texts to provide a comprehensive suite of studies into early practices in this fundamental field of human experience.

Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians

Author: Owsei Temkin

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801840906

Category: Medical

Page: 315

View: 1044

Temkin shows how the perennial appeal of Hippocratic practice helped establish the relationship between scientific medicine and monotheistic religion.

Oxford Handbook of Science and Medicine in the Classical World

Author: Paul Keyser,with John Scarborough

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190878835

Category: History

Page: 1200

View: 9980

With a focus on science in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome, including glimpses into Egypt, Mesopotamia, India and China, The Oxford Handbook of Science and Medicine in the Classical World offers an in depth synthesis of science and medicine circa 650 BCE to 650 CE. The Handbook comprises five sections, each with a specific focus on ancient science and medicine. The second section covers the early Greek era, up through Plato and the mid-fourth century bce. The third section covers the long Hellenistic era, from Aristotle through the end of the Roman Republic, acknowledging that the political shift does not mark a sharp intellectual break. The fourth section covers the Roman era from the late Republic through the transition to Late Antiquity. The final section covers the era of Late Antiquity, including the early Byzantine centuries. The Handbook provides through each of its approximately four dozen essays, a synthesis and synopsis of the concepts and models of the various ancient natural sciences, covering the early Greek era through the fall of the Roman Republic, including essays that explore topics such as music theory, ancient philosophers, astrology, and alchemy. The Oxford Handbook of Science and Medicine in the Classical World guides the reader to further exploration of the concepts and models of the ancient sciences, how they evolved and changed over time, and how they relate to one another and to their antecedents. There are a total of four dozen or so topical essays in the five sections, each of which takes as its focus the primary texts, explaining what is now known as well as indicating what future generations of scholars may come to know. Contributors suggest the ranges of scholarly disagreements and have been free to advocate their own positions. Readers are led into further literature (both primary and secondary) through the comprehensive and extensive bibliographies provided with each chapter.

Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity

Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease

Author: Philip J. van der Eijk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139443531

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 3666

This work brings together Philip van der Eijk's previously published essays on the close connections that existed between medicine and philosophy throughout antiquity. Medical authors such as the Hippocratic writers, Diocles, Galen, Soranus and Caelius Aurelianus elaborated on philosophical methods such as causal explanation, definition and division and applied key concepts such as the notion of nature to their understanding of the human body. Similarly, philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle were highly valued for their contributions to medicine. This interaction was particularly striking in the study of the human soul in its relation to the body, as illustrated by approaches to specific topics such as intellect, sleep and dreams, and diet and drugs. With a detailed introduction surveying the subject as a whole and an essay on Aristotle's treatment of sleep, this wide-ranging and accessible collection is essential reading for the student of ancient philosophy and science.

Cure and Cult in Ancient Corinth

A Guide to the Asklepieion

Author: Mabel L. Lang

Publisher: ASCSA

ISBN: 9780876616703

Category: History

Page: 31

View: 1598

Hundreds of life-size human limbs made from terracotta, including the remains of at least 125 human hands, testify to the efficacy of the medicine practiced at the Aklepieion, on the hillside north of ancient Corinth. Made as votive gifts to thank the god for a cure, these were among many extraordinary finds made during excavations at the Temple of Asklepios and Lerna spring between 1929 and 1934. As well as providing a helpful guide to the site, this fascinating booklet also offers a unique insight into the work of physicians in the Greek world, and the types of diseases they had to contend with.

Plague and the Athenian Imagination

Drama, History, and the Cult of Asclepius

Author: Robin Mitchell-Boyask

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139468235

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1751

The great plague of Athens that began in 430 BCE had an enormous effect on the imagination of its literary artists and on the social imagination of the city as a whole. In this 2007 book, Professor Mitchell-Boyask studies the impact of the plague on Athenian tragedy early in the 420s and argues for a significant relationship between drama and the development of the cult of the healing god Asclepius in the next decade, during a period of war and increasing civic strife. The Athenian decision to locate their temple for Asclepius adjacent to the Theater of Dionysus arose from deeper associations between drama, healing and the polis that were engaged actively by the crisis of the plague. The book also considers the representation of the plague in Thucydides' History as well as the metaphors generated by that representation which recur later in the same work.

The Archaeology of Medicine in the Greco-Roman World

Author: Patricia A. Baker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107292131

Category: Social Science

Page: 210

View: 3376

This book teaches students and scholars of Greco-Roman medical history how to use and critically assess archaeological materials. Ancient medicine is a subject dominated by textual sources, yet there is a wealth of archaeological remains that can be used to broaden our understanding of medicine in the past. In order to use the information properly, this book explains how to ask questions of an archaeological nature, how to access different types of archaeological materials, and how to overcome problems the researcher might face. It also acts as an introduction to the archaeology of medicine for archaeologists interested in this aspect of their subject. Although the focus is on the Greco-Roman period, the methods and theories explained within the text can be applied to other periods in history. The areas covered include text as material culture, images, artifacts, spaces of medicine, and science and archaeology.

Magic in Western Culture

From Antiquity to the Enlightenment

Author: Brian P. Copenhaver

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316299481

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 517

The story of the beliefs and practices called 'magic' starts in ancient Iran, Greece, and Rome, before entering its crucial Christian phase in the Middle Ages. Centering on the Renaissance and Marsilio Ficino - whose work on magic was the most influential account written in premodern times - this groundbreaking book treats magic as a classical tradition with foundations that were distinctly philosophical. Besides Ficino, the premodern story of magic also features Plotinus, Iamblichus, Proclus, Aquinas, Agrippa, Pomponazzi, Porta, Bruno, Campanella, Descartes, Boyle, Leibniz, and Newton, to name only a few of the prominent thinkers discussed in this book. Because pictures play a key role in the story of magic, this book is richly illustrated.

Medicine and Religion

A Historical Introduction

Author: Gary B. Ferngren

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421412179

Category: Medical

Page: 256

View: 1615

Medicine and Religion is the first book to comprehensively examine the relationship between medicine and religion in the Western tradition from ancient times to the modern era. Beginning with the earliest attempts to heal the body and account for the meaning of illness in the ancient Near East, historian Gary B. Ferngren describes how the polytheistic religions of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome and the monotheistic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam have complemented medicine in the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Ferngren paints a broad and detailed portrait of how humans throughout the ages have drawn on specific values of diverse religious traditions in caring for the body. Religious perspectives have informed both the treatment of disease and the provision of health care. And, while tensions have sometimes existed, relations between medicine and religion have often been cooperative and mutually beneficial. Religious beliefs provided a framework for explaining disease and suffering that was larger than medicine alone could offer. These beliefs furnished a theological basis for a compassionate care of the sick that led to the creation of the hospital and a long tradition of charitable medicine. Praise for Medicine and Health Care in Early Christianity, by Gary B. Ferngren "This fine work looks forward as well as backward; it invites fuller reflection of the many senses in which medicine and religion intersect and merits wide readership."— JAMA "An important book, for students of Christian theology who understand health and healing to be topics of theological interest, and for health care practitioners who seek a historical perspective on the development of the ethos of their vocation."— Journal of Religion and Health

The Evolution of Modern Medicine; A Series of Lectures Delivered at Yale University on the Silliman Foundation in April, 1913

Author: William Osler

Publisher: Sagwan Press

ISBN: 9781376716931

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 3202

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Three Books on Life

Author: Marsilio Ficino

Publisher: Mrts

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 507

View: 4347

The Balance Within

The Science Connecting Health and Emotions

Author: Esther M. Sternberg

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780716744450

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 250

View: 6090

The chief of neuroendocrine immunology at the National Institute of Mental Health offers evidence that emotional and physical health influence each other, and examines the critical role relationships, faith, and emotional well-being play in resisting dise

Hippocrates and Medical Education

Selected Papers Presented at the XIIth International Hippocrates Colloquium, Universiteit Leiden, 24-26 August 2005

Author: Manfred Horstmanshoff

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9047425952

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 2303

The collection of writings known as the Corpus Hippocraticum played a decisive role in medical education for more than twenty four centuries. This is the first full-length volume on medical education in Graeco-Roman antiquity since Kudlien’s seminal article from 1970. The articles in this volume were originally presented as papers at the XIIth International Colloquium Hippocraticum in Leiden in 2005.

Hippocratic Recipes

Oral and Written Transmission of Pharmacological Knowledge in Fifth- And Fourth-Century Greece

Author: Laurence M. V. Totelin

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004171541

Category: Science

Page: 366

View: 6383

Drawing on philological studies, social history and anthropology, this book offers the first extended study of the recipes included in the Hippocratic Corpus. It examines the links between oral and written traditions in the transmission of ancient pharmacological knowledge.