The 'Wetiko' Legal Principles

Cree and Anishinabek Responses to Violence and Victimization

Author: Hadley Friedland

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487522029

Category: Law

Page: 144

View: 570

In The Wetiko Legal Principles, Hadley Friedland explores how the concept of a wetiko can be used to address the unspeakable happenings that endanger the lives of many Indigenous children.

Gender, Power, and Representations of Cree Law

Author: Emily Snyder

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774835710

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 7579

Drawing on the insights of Indigenous feminist legal theory, Emily Snyder examines representations of Cree law and gender in books, videos, graphic novels, educational websites, online lectures, and a video game. Although these resources promote the revitalization of Cree law and the principle of miyo-wîcêhtowin (good relations), Snyder argues that they do not capture the complexities of gendered power relations. The majority of these resources either erase women’s legal authority by not mentioning them, or they diminish their agency by portraying Cree laws and gender roles in inflexible, aesthetically pleasing ways that overlook power imbalances and other forms of oppression.

Dialogues on Human Rights and Legal Pluralism

Author: René Provost,Colleen Sheppard

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400747101

Category: Law

Page: 290

View: 3580

Human rights have transformed the way in which we conceive the place of the individual within the community and in relation to the state in a vast array of disciplines, including law, philosophy, politics, sociology, geography. The published output on human rights over the last five decades has been enormous, but has remained tightly bound to a notion of human rights as dialectically linking the individual and the state. Because of human rights’ dogged focus on the state and its actions, they have very seldom attracted the attention of legal pluralists. Indeed, some may have viewed the two as simply incompatible or relating to wholly distinct phenomena. This collection of essays is the first to bring together authors with established track records in the fields of legal pluralism and human rights, to explore the ways in which these concepts can be mutually reinforcing, delegitimizing, or competing. The essays reveal that there is no facile conclusion to reach but that the question opens avenues which are likely to be mined for years to come by those interested in how human rights can affect the behaviour of individuals and institutions.

Canada's Residential Schools: Reconciliation

The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Author: Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773598308

Category: Social Science

Page: 297

View: 9320

Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to “civilize and Christianize” Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools’ former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission’s final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada’s Residential Schools: Reconciliation documents the complexities, challenges, and possibilities of reconciliation by presenting the findings of public testimonies from residential school Survivors and others who participated in the TRC’s national events and community hearings. For many Aboriginal people, reconciliation is foremost about healing families and communities, and revitalizing Indigenous cultures, languages, spirituality, laws, and governance systems. For governments, building a respectful relationship involves dismantling a centuries-old political and bureaucratic culture in which, all too often, policies and programs are still based on failed notions of assimilation. For churches, demonstrating long-term commitment to reconciliation requires atoning for harmful actions in the residential schools, respecting Indigenous spirituality, and supporting Indigenous peoples’ struggles for justice and equity. Schools must teach Canadian history in ways that foster mutual respect, empathy, and engagement. All Canadian children and youth deserve to know what happened in the residential schools and to appreciate the rich history and collective knowledge of Indigenous peoples. This volume also emphasizes the important role of public memory in the reconciliation process, as well as the role of Canadian society, including the corporate and non-profit sectors, the media, and the sports community in reconciliation. The Commission urges Canada to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation. While Aboriginal peoples are victims of violence and discrimination, they are also holders of Treaty, Aboriginal, and human rights and have a critical role to play in reconciliation. All Canadians must understand how traditional First Nations, Inuit, and Métis approaches to resolving conflict, repairing harm, and restoring relationships can inform the reconciliation process. The TRC’s calls to action identify the concrete steps that must be taken to ensure that our children and grandchildren can live together in dignity, peace, and prosperity on these lands we now share.

Law Mart

Justice, Access, and For-Profit Law Schools

Author: Riaz Tejani

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503603024

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 1334

American law schools are in deep crisis. Enrollment is down, student loan debt is up, and the profession's supply of high-paying jobs is shrinking. Meanwhile, thousands of graduates remain underemployed while the legal needs of low-income communities go substantially unmet. Many blame overregulation and seek a "free" market to solve the problem, but this has already been tested. Seizing on a deregulatory policy shift at the American Bar Association, private equity financiers established the first for-profit law schools in the early 2000s with the stated mission to increase access to justice by "serving the underserved". Pursuing this mission at a feverish rate of growth, they offered the promise of professional upward mobility through high-tech, simplified teaching and learning. In Law Mart, a vivid ethnography of one such environment, Riaz Tejani argues that the rise of for-profit law schools shows the limits of a market-based solution to American access to justice. Building on theories in law, political economy, and moral anthropology, Tejani reveals how for-profit law schools marketed themselves directly to ethnoracial and socioeconomic "minority" communities, relaxed admission standards, increased diversity, shook up established curricula, and saw student success rates plummet. They contributed to a dramatic rise in U.S. law student debt burdens while charging premium tuition financed up-front through federal loans over time. If economic theories have so influenced legal scholarship, what happens when they come to shape law school transactions, governance, and oversight? For students promised professional citizenship by these institutions, is there a need for protections that better uphold institutional quality and sustainability? Offering an unprecedented glimpse of this landscape, Law Mart is a colorful foray into these essential questions.

Effective Fundraising for Nonprofits

Real-World Strategies That Work

Author: Ilona Bray

Publisher: Nolo

ISBN: 1413322980

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 488

View: 7230

A comprehensive book that fundraising professionals like to keep handy, packed with practical and legal information covering every aspect of getting financial support for a charitable organization.

Otter’s Journey through Indigenous Language and Law

Author: Lindsay Keegitah Borrows

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774836601

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 2388

Storytelling has the capacity to address feelings and demonstrate themes – to illuminate beyond argument and theoretical exposition. In Otter’s Journey, Borrows makes use of the Anishinaabe tradition of storytelling to explore how the work in Indigenous language revitalization can inform the emerging field of Indigenous legal revitalization. She follows Otter, a dodem (clan) relation from the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation, on a journey across Anishinaabe, Inuit, Māori, Coast Salish, and Abenaki territories, through a narrative of Indigenous resurgence. In doing so, she reveals that the processes, philosophies, and practices flowing from Indigenous languages and laws can emerge from under the layers of colonial laws, policies, and languages to become guiding principles in people’s contemporary lives.

Canadian Fairy Tales

Author: Cyrus MacMillan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fairy tales

Page: 203

View: 3884

Reach for the Summit

Author: Pat Summitt

Publisher: Crown Business

ISBN: 0767999282

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 2805

"I'm someone who will push you beyond all reasonable limits. Someone who will ask you not to just fulfill your potential but to exceed it. Someone who will expect more from you than you may believe you are capable of. So if you aren't ready to go to work, shut this book." --Pat Summitt Pat Summitt, head coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols, was a phenomenon in women's basketball. Her ferociously competitive teams won the NCAA championship in 1996 and 1997 and made her the winningest coach in NCAA Division 1 women's history. Summitt wrote the first motivational book by a high-achieving female coach. In Reach for the Summit, she presented her formula for success, which she called the "Definite Dozen System." In each of the book's twelve chapters, Summitt talked about one of the system's principles--such as responsibility, discipline, and loyalty--and showed how to apply it to your own situation. Pat Summitt used her own remarkable story as a vehicle for explaining how anyone can transform herself through ambition. Through many amusing anecdotes and a few very painful memories, she revealed her mistakes and triumphs as a beginning basketball player, as an Olympic athlete, as a Division 1 coach, and as a mother. Although Summitt was not born to the easy life--she was born into a hard-working farm family in a remote corner of Tennessee--she became one of the most successful and highest-paid coaches in the country. She candidly talked about how she turned her losses into wins and then showed how you can do the same. Wonderfully entertaining and brilliantly instructive, Reach for the Summit discloses the winning secret to building a principled system and making it to the top at whatever you do. Pat Summitt's story will motivate you to achieve in sports, business, and the most important game of all--life. From the Hardcover edition.

New Television

The Aesthetics and Politics of a Genre

Author: Martin Shuster

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022650395X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 263

View: 9714

Worlds on screen: the ontology of television series and/as the ontology of film -- Storytelling and worldhood: the screen and us -- "This America, man": tragic reconciliation, television, and The Wire -- The gangster, boredom, and family: Weeds, natality, and new television -- "Boyd and I dug coal together": Justified, moral perfectionism, and the United States of America -- Conclusion

The Gilded Age

Overture to the American Century

Author: Alan Axelrod

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781454925750

Category:

Page: 272

View: 6711

Because of Sex

One Law, Ten Cases, and Fifty Years That Changed American Women's Lives at Work

Author: Gillian Thomas

Publisher: Picador USA

ISBN: 1250138086

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 5920

A compelling look at ten of the most important Supreme Court cases defining women’s rights on the job, as told by the brave women who brought the cases to court

The Erosion of Tribal Power

The Supreme Court's Silent Revolution

Author: Dewi I. Ball

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780806155654

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 921

For the past 180 years, the inherent power of indigenous tribes to govern themselves has been a central tenet of federal Indian law. Despite the U.S. Supreme Court's repeated confirmation of Native sovereignty since the early 1830s, it has, in the past half-century, incrementally curtailed the power of tribes to govern non-Indians on Indian reservations. The result, Dewi Ioan Ball argues, has been a "silent revolution," mounted by particular justices so gradually and quietly that the significance of the Court's rulings has largely evaded public scrutiny. Ball begins his examination of the erosion of tribal sovereignty by reviewing the so-called Marshall trilogy, the three cases that established two fundamental principles: tribal sovereignty and the power of Congress to protect Indian tribes from the encroachment of state law. Neither the Supreme Court nor Congress has remained faithful to these principles, Ball shows. Beginning with Williams v. Lee, a 1959 case that highlighted the tenuous position of Native legal authority over reservation lands and their residents, Ball analyzes multiple key cases, demonstrating how the Supreme Court's decisions weakened the criminal, civil, and taxation authority of tribal nations. During an era when many tribes were strengthening their economies and preserving their cultural identities, the high court was undermining sovereignty. In Atkinson Trading Co. v. Shirley (2001) and Nevada v. Hicks (2001), for example, the Court all but obliterated tribal authority over non-Indians on Native land. By drawing on the private papers of Chief Justice Earl Warren and Justices Harry A. Blackmun, William J. Brennan, Thurgood Marshall, William O. Douglas, Lewis F. Powell Jr., and Hugo L. Black, Ball offers crucial insight into federal Indian law from the perspective of the justices themselves. The Erosion of Tribal Power shines much-needed light on crucial changes to federal Indian law between 1959 and 2001 and discusses how tribes have dealt with the political and economic consequences of the Court's decisions.

Canada's Indigenous Constitution

Author: John Borrows

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442610387

Category: Law

Page: 427

View: 8379

With characteristic richness and eloquence, John Borrows explores legal traditions, the role of governments and courts, and the prospect of a multi-juridical legal culture, all with a view to understanding and improving legal processes in Canada. He discusses the place of individuals, families, and communities in recovering and extending the role of Indigenous law within both Indigenous communities and Canadian society more broadly."--pub. desc.

Elements of Indigenous Style

A Guide for Writing By and About Indigenous Peoples

Author: Gregory Younging

Publisher: Brush Education

ISBN: 1550597167

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 9186

Elements of Indigenous Style offers Indigenous writers and editors—and everyone creating works about Indigenous Peoples—the first published guide to common questions and issues of style and process. Everyone working in words or other media needs to read this important new reference, and to keep it nearby while they’re working. This guide features: - Twenty-two succinct style principles. - Advice on culturally appropriate publishing practices, including how to collaborate with Indigenous Peoples, when and how to seek the advice of Elders, and how to respect Indigenous Oral Traditions and Traditional Knowledge. - Terminology to use and to avoid. - Advice on specific editing issues, such as biased language, capitalization, and quoting from historical sources and archives. - Case studies of projects that illustrate best practices.

Drawing Out Law

A Spirit's Guide

Author: John Borrows

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442610093

Category: Law

Page: 259

View: 5406

Shedding light on Canadian law and policy as they relate to Indigenous peoples, Drawing Out Law illustrates past and present moral agency of Indigenous peoples and their approaches to the law and calls for the renewal of ancient Ojibway teaching in contemporary circumstances.

Sexual Offences Against Children

The Badgley Report

Author: Donald Macdonald,James R. Robertson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Child sexual abuse

Page: 21

View: 1197

Junk Beautiful: Furniture Re[Freshed]

Author: Sue Whitney

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781631868375

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 208

View: 8370

Re-using and re-inventing vintage castoffs as home furnishings take center stage in today's home decor, as these one-of-a-kind treasures create uniquely personal spaces. Best-selling author and junking maven Sue Whitney unleashes her JUNKMARKET Style on furniture and accessories that make a statement, add a little flair, and tell a story. These pieces are coming from many places--the flea market, antique shop, vintage fair, grandmother's attic, and Goodwill store--and all are getting a new lease on life with a little DIY creativity. In Junk Beautiful Furniture Re(Freshed), Sue Whitney, heralded as the Queen of Junk and founder of the wilkdly successful JUNKMARKET Style community, provides inspiration for reimagining and refashioning furniture and accessory pieces. Each of the 30 projects is presented with clear, concise step-by-step text and photographs, requires little to no skill, and can be completed in a weekend or less.

Prime Ministerial Power in Canada

Its Origins under Macdonald, Laurier, and Borden

Author: Patrice Dutil

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774834765

Category: Political Science

Page: 412

View: 4848

Many Canadians lament that prime ministerial power has become too concentrated since the 1970s. This book contradicts this view by demonstrating how prime ministerial power was centralized from the very beginning of Confederation and that the first three important prime ministers – Macdonald, Laurier, and Borden – channelled that centralizing impulse to adapt to the circumstances they faced. Using a variety of innovative approaches, Patrice Dutil focuses on the managerial philosophies of each of the prime ministers. He shows that by securing a firm grip on the instruments of governance these early first ministers inevitably shaped the administrations they headed, as well as those that followed.