Voices from the Aslyum

West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum

Author: Mark Davis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445621886

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 96

View: 8928

West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum Through Time

Author: Mark Davis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445632136

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 8655

During the eighteenth century the plight of those considered insane was dismal. Many were locked up in madhouses or chained in the workhouse, their illnesses ignored. It was only with the advent of the Industrial Revolution that reform came into place.

Asylum

Inside the Pauper Lunatic Asylums

Author: Mark Davis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445636425

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 7933

With the advent of care in the community for the mentally afflicted, the self-contained villages for the apparently insane have now been consigned to the history books. These once bustling Victorian institutions were commonly known in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as the county asylum or the pauper lunatic asylum , and were an accepted and essential part of society for nearly two centuries. It is difficult to believe that, in 1914, there were 102 such asylums, accommodating over 100,000 patients, the majority of whom lived their entire lives under care and treatment. In 2014, with the exception of those that have already been demolished, these buildings now lie empty and derelict, or have been converted for contemporary living. Through this photographic book, we journey into the inner sanctum of a world of lost dreams, where hope was more often than not unwillingly traded for an uncomfortable acceptance.

Life in the Victorian Asylum

The World of Nineteenth Century Mental Health Care

Author: Mark Stevens

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473842387

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 8743

Life in the Victorian Asylum reconstructs the lost world of the nineteenth century public asylums. This fresh take on the history of mental health reveals why county asylums were built, the sort of people they housed and the treatments they received, as well as the enduring legacy of these remarkable institutions. Mark Stevens, the best-selling author of Broadmoor Revealed, is a professional archivist and expert on asylum records. In this book, he delves into Victorian mental health archives to recreate the experience of entering an asylum and being treated there, perhaps for a lifetime. Praise for Broadmoor Revealed 'Superb,' Family Tree magazine 'Detailed and thoughtful,' Times Literary Supplement 'Paints a fascinating picture,' Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine

Broadmoor Revealed

Victorian Crime and the Lunatic Asylum

Author: Mark Stevens

Publisher: Seaforth

ISBN: 9781781593202

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 3178

The five volumes that constitute Arthur Marder's From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow represented arguably the finest contribution to the literature of naval history since Alfred Mahan. A J P Taylor wrote that 'his naval history has a unique fascination. To unrivalled mastery of sources he adds a gift of simple narrative . . . He is beyond praise, as he is beyond cavil.' The five volumes were subtitled The Royal Navy in the Fisher Era, 1904–1919 and they are still, despite recent major contributions from Robert Massie and Andrew Gordan, regarded by many as the definitive history of naval events leading up to and including the Great War. This first volume covers many facets of the history of the Royal Navy during the pre-war decade, including the economic and political background such as the 1906 Liberal Government hostility towards naval spending. Inevitably, however, attention moves to the German naval challenge, the arms race and the subsequent Anglo-German rivalry, and, finally, the British plans for the blockade of the German High Seas Fleet. A new introduction by Barry Gough, the distinguished Canadian maritime and naval historian, assesses the importance of Marder's work and anchors it firmly amongst the great naval narrative histories of this era. This new paperback edition will bring a truly great work to a new generation of historians and general readers.

Fair Mile Hospital

A Victorian Asylum

Author: Ian Wheeler

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750964790

Category: Medical

Page: 192

View: 2299

Fair Mile was more than just a psychiatric hospital; it was an example of a nationwide network of "pauper lunatic asylums," born of responsible Victorian legislation and compassion for the disadvantaged. It was a secure home to many of its patients and staff, and the community within its walls became an integral part of Cholsey, touching almost every household in the area. Drawing on county records, first-hand accounts, and archive photographs, Fair Mile Hospital describes the ethos of the Victorian asylum builders and the development of the facility that treated thousands of patients over four generations. Relating changes in practice and personnel, and the difficulties of two world wars, this is a unique account of a hospital that did its utmost for those in its care.

The Ballroom

A Novel

Author: Anna Hope

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0812995163

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 392

A searing novel of forbidden love on the Yorkshire moors—“a British version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (The Times U.K.)—from the author of the critically acclaimed debut Wake England, 1911. At Sharston Asylum, men and women are separated by thick walls and barred windows. But on Friday nights, they are allowed to mingle in the asylum’s magnificent ballroom. From its balconies and vaulted ceilings to its stained glass, the ballroom is a sanctuary. Onstage, the orchestra plays Strauss and Debussy while the patients twirl across the gleaming dance floor. Amid this heady ambience, John Mulligan and Ella Fay first meet. John is a sure-footed dancer with a clouded, secretive face; Ella is as skittish as a colt, with her knobby knees and flushed cheeks. Despite their grim circumstances, the unlikely pair strikes up a tenuous courtship. During the week, he writes letters smuggled to her in secret, unaware that Ella cannot read. She enlists a friend to read them aloud and gains resolve from the force of John’s words, each sentence a stirring incantation. And, of course, there’s always the promise of the ballroom. Then one of them receives an unexpected opportunity to leave Sharston for good. As Anna Hope’s powerful, bittersweet novel unfolds, John and Ella face an agonizing dilemma: whether to cling to familiar comforts or to confront a new world—living apart, yet forever changed. Praise for The Ballroom “The Ballroom successfully blends historical research with emotional intelligence to explore the tensions and trials of the human condition with grace and insight.”—New York Times Book Review “Part historical novel and part romance, The Ballroom paints an incredibly rich portrait of the mentally stable forced to live in an asylum. [Anna] Hope transports readers inside the asylum, to feel the thick humidity of the stale summer air of the day room, and the gritty and brutal reality inside those walls.”—Booklist “A compelling cast of emotionally resonant characters, as well as a bittersweet climax, render Hope’s second novel a powerful, memorable experience.”—Publishers Weekly “Hope’s writing is consistently beautiful. . . . Recommended for readers who enjoy historical fiction by Sarah Waters or Emma Donoghue.”—Library Journal “A beautifully wrought novel, a tender, heartbreaking and insightful exploration of the longings that survive in the most inhospitable environments.”—Sunday Express “The Ballroom has all the intensity and lyricism of [Anna] Hope’s debut, Wake. At its heart is a tender and absorbing love story.”—Daily Mail “Compelling and masterful . . . Anna Hope has proven once again that she is a luminary in historical fiction. . . . She delivers profound, poignant narratives that stir the emotions.”—Yorkshire Post “As with Hope’s highly acclaimed debut novel, Wake, the writing is elegant and insightful; she writes beautifully about human emotion, landscape and weather.”—The Observer “A brilliantly moving meditation on what it means to be ‘insane’ in a cruel world . . . All the characters are vividly and sensitively drawn. . . . Deeply moving.”—The Irish Times From the Hardcover edition.

A Journey In Time Through Goosnargh, Whittingham & Inglewhite

Author: Janet Rigby

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 0244003599

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4758

With the redevelopment of Whittingham Hospital, which closed its doors thirty years ago, much has changed in Goosnargh and Whittingham. It is still of great interest historically, first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 and the ancient parish church of St, Mary's stands as it has done for centuries, flanked by the imposing Bushells Hospital, Grapes Inn and the school. Historic halls still hold their secrets of priest holes and private chapels, the place names of Button Street and Silk Mill Lane remind us of its once prosperous cottage industries. Looking back at Club days of the Friendly Society, Harvest Festivals, Royal Jubilees, bull baiting and gambling on Inglewhite Green, eccentric vicars, and much more which helps to build a picture of what life was like in the 19th century and beyond, Characters of Goosnargh in the past, including the first chronicler of Goosnargh, Richard Cookson who wrote Goosnargh Past and Present and the Goosnargh Rambler, which were an inspiration for this book.

The Victorian Asylum

Author: Sarah Rutherford

Publisher: Shire Publications

ISBN: 9780747806691

Category: History

Page: 56

View: 1939

The Victorian lunatic asylum has a special place in history. Dreaded and reviled by many, these nineteenth-century buildings provide a unique window on how the Victorians housed and treated the mentally ill. Despite initially good intentions, they became warehouses for society's outcasts at a time when cures were far fewer than hoped for. Isolated, hidden in the countryside and surrounded by high walls, they were eventually distributed throughout Britain, the Empire, the Continent and North America, with 120 or so in England and Wales alone. Now the memory of them is fading, and many of the buildings have gone or are threatened. Most have been closed as hospitals since the 1980s and either been demolished or turned into prestigious private apartments, their original use largely forgotten. Their memory deserves rehabilitation as a fascinating part of Victorian life that survived into modern times. In The Victorian Asylum, Sarah Rutherford gives an insight into their history, their often imposing architecture, and their later decline, and brings to life these haunting buildings, some of which still survive today.

Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots

A History of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland

Author: Kathryn Burtinshaw,John R F Burt

Publisher:

ISBN: 147387906X

Category: Medical

Page: 248

View: 7894

In the first half of the nineteenth century, treatment of the mentally ill in Britain and Ireland underwent radical change. No longer manacled, chained and treated like wild animals, patient care was defined in law and medical understanding, and treatment of insanity developed. Focusing on selected cases, this new study enables the reader to understand how progressively advancing attitudes and expectations affected decisions, leading to better legislation and medical practice throughout the century. Specific mental health conditions are discussed in detail and the treatments patients received are analysed in an expert way. A clear view of why institutional asylums were established, their ethos for the treatment of patients, and how they were run as palaces rather than prisons giving moral therapy to those affected becomes apparent. The changing ways in which patients were treated, and altered societal views to the incarceration of the mentally ill, are explored. The book is thoroughly illustrated and contains images of patients and asylum staff never previously published, as well as first-hand accounts of life in a nineteenth-century asylum from a patients perspective. Written for genealogists as well as historians, this book contains clear information concerning access to asylum records and other relevant primary sources and how to interpret their contents in a meaningful way.

The Lives They Left Behind

Suitcases from a State Hospital Attic

Author: Darby Penney

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458765989

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 4735

More than four hundred abandoned suitcases filled with patients' belongings were found when Willard Psychiatric Center closed in 1995 after 125 years of operation. In this fully-illustrated social history, they are skillfully examined and compared to the written record to create a moving-and devastating-group portrait of twentieth-century American psychiatric care.

Mental Ward

Stories from the Asylum

Author: Jennifer Loring,Tom Howard,Megan Dorei

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780615818795

Category: Horror tales, American

Page: 253

View: 7859

Sanatorium, mental ward, psychiatric hospital - they're all the same. Places where the infirm, the crazy, and the certifiable go for treatment... Or what passes for 'treatment'. This is a collection of stories of bedlam taking place within the padded walls of an institution. Stories of experiments gone wrong, patients revolting against the staff, or even the deranged doings of those charged with giving care. They are sick, depraved, and atrocious - the type of stories that rarely reach the light of day. Are you brave enough to crawl inside the minds of the twelve authors who wrote these tales... Or are you afraid you'll be locked up for peeking?

In Darkest England and the Way Out

Author: William Booth

Publisher: W. Bryce

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agricultural colonies

Page: 285

View: 4381

An analysis of the causes of poverty in England, with some proposed solutions, from the founder of the Salvation Army. The title is a deliberate reference to Stanley's "In darkest Africa," which was published the same year.

Madness, Cannabis and Colonialism

The 'Native Only' Lunatic Asylums of British India 1857-1900

Author: J. Mills

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780333793343

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 2505

This fascinating, entertaining and often gruelling book by James Mills, examines the lunatic asylums set up by the British in nineteenth-century India. The author asserts that there was a growth in asylums following the Indian Mutiny, fuelled by the fear of itinerant and dangerous individuals, which existed primarily in the British imagination. Once established though, these asylums, which were staffed by Indians and populated by Indians, quickly became arenas in which the designs of the British were contested and confronted. Mills argues that power is everywhere and is behind every action; colonial power is therefore just another way to assert control over the less powerful. This social history draws on official archives and documents based in Scotland, England and India. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in history, sociology, or the general interest reader.

How the Other Half Lives

Studies Among the Tenements of New York

Author: Jacob August Riis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: New York (N.Y.)

Page: 304

View: 4297

In the Footsteps of the Brontes

Author: Mark Davis,Ann Dinsdale

Publisher: Amberley Pub Plc

ISBN: 9781445607795

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 94

View: 1355

The Bronte's and their stories are so ingrained into our cultural psyche that we think we know them inside out - but walking in the footsteps of the literary greats and their characters offers a new perspective of their work. Mark Davies shows us through his stunning photography how his native Yorkshire influenced the Bronte family, and picks out certain buildings and aspects that were renamed and included in their writing. Through a fascinating selection of carefully selected old images, displayed alongside modern equivalents, it is hoped that a new and unique light will illuminate a fresh and exciting aspect of the Bronte's and their world. This unique collection will be essential reading for anyone who knows and loves Yorkshire, or the Brontes.

An Accidental MP

Author: Martin Bell

Publisher: Penguin Uk

ISBN: 9780140293746

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 247

View: 7511

After the most unusual and quixotic campaign of recent memory, Martin Bell was elected to Parliament by a landslide as an Independent - a species thought to have been extinct since 1950.

Life on the Mississippi

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: N.A

Category: Authors, American

Page: 26

View: 3641

BUT the basin of the Mississippi is the BODY OF THE NATION. All the other parts are but members, important in themselves, yet more important in their relations to this. Exclusive of the Lake basin and of 300,000 square miles in Texas and New Mexico, which in many aspects form a part of it, this basin contains about 1,250,000 square miles. In extent it is the second great valley of the world, being exceeded only by that of the Amazon. The valley of the frozen Obi approaches it in extent; that of La Plata comes next in space, and probably in habitable capacity, having about eight-ninths of its area; then comes that of the Yenisei, with about seven-ninths; the Lena, Amoor, Hoang-ho, Yang-tse-kiang, and Nile, five-ninths; the Ganges, less than one-half; the Indus, less than one-third; the Euphrates, one-fifth; the Rhine, one-fifteenth. It exceeds in extent the whole of Europe, exclusive of Russia, Norway, and Sweden. IT WOULD CONTAIN AUSTRIA FOUR TIMES, GERMANY OR SPAIN FIVE TIMES, FRANCE SIX TIMES, THE BRITISH ISLANDS OR ITALY TEN TIMES. Conceptions formed from the river-basins of Western Europe are rudely shocked when we consider the extent of the valley of the Mississippi; nor are those formed from the sterile basins of the great rivers of Siberia, the lofty plateaus of Central Asia, or the mighty sweep of the swampy Amazon more adequate. Latitude, elevation, and rainfall all combine to render every part of the Mississippi Valley capable of supporting a dense population. AS A DWELLING-PLACE FOR CIVILIZED MAN IT IS BY FAR THE FIRST UPON OUR GLOBE.

The Dark Threads

Author: Jean Davison

Publisher: Accent Press Ltd

ISBN: 1908917628

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 361

View: 3714

Teenage life in the swinging sixties, hanging out in coffee bars talking fashion and pop music, who could wish for more? But in August 1968, growing pains started to kick hard for 18-year-old office worker Jean Davison and adolescent idealism quickly turns to angst and emptiness. With her home life in chaos, Jean turns to a psychiatrist hoping for a sensible adult to talk to. That’s where her problems really begin: a week’s voluntary psychiatric rest is the start of one long nightmare of drugs, electric shock treatment and abuse which turn her into a zombie. Losing five years of her young life to the mental health system, Jean finally finds the courage to say “no” to drugs and turns her life around, finds love and returns to the mental health service as a worker. Balancing quotes from case number 10826, her actual case notes which reveal a diagnosis of chronic schizophrenia, with her own account of interviews with doctors, this memoir raises disturbing questions on the treatment of psychiatric patients, which are still relevant today Jean Davison, was born in 1950 into a working class family in Yorkshire She left school at 15 to work in a factory. After leaving the psychiatric system she returned to education to study for GCEs. She has worked as a secretary for the NSPCC and within the health service. In 1979 she met Ian who she later married. She later graduated from university with a first-class degree in literature and psychology. Still living in Yorkshire with Ian, she now works in mental health. The Dark Threads is her first book.

The Pig-faced Lady of Manchester Square & Other Medical Marvels

Author: Jan Bondeson

Publisher: History PressLtd

ISBN: 9780752429687

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 6802

This is the remarkable story of the lives of individuals afflicted with severe deformities and how 17th and 18th century British society reacted to their extraordinary bodies. This is the remarkable story of the lives of individuals afflicted with severe deformities and how 17th and 18th century British society reacted to their extraordinary bodies.