50 Events that Shaped Latino History: An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic [2 volumes]

Author: Lilia Fernández

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440837635

Category: Social Science

Page: 921

View: 8863

What are the historical events most key to shaping Latino culture? This book provides detailed and broad coverage of the 50 most pivotal developments across more than 500 years' time that have shaped the Latino experience, offering primary sources, biographies of notable figures, and suggested readings for further research. • Offers scholarly analysis of critical events in Latino/a history while also providing in-depth primary sources, biographies, and evidence that provide additional historical perspective • Represents an invaluable reference tool for students doing research papers, seeking accessibly written background information, or simply wanting to learn more about Latinos in the United States • Written by expert contributors with specialties in a variety of key fields—media, politics, history, and popular culture • Supplies breadth and depth on significant events that have shaped the Latino experience for the past five centuries

Toward a Latino/a Biblical Interpretation

Author: Francisco Lozada Jr.

Publisher: SBL Press

ISBN: 0884142698

Category: Religion

Page: 148

View: 8081

Engage an interdisciplinary approach In Toward a Latino/a Biblical Interpretation Francisco Lozada Jr. explores the complex and diverse issues related to Latino/a biblical interpretation. After laying the theoretical foundation, he offers three sample readings of biblical texts to lead readers through the intricacy of interpretation that has historically and culturally surrounded understanding what it means to do Latino/a biblical interpretation. Throughout, Lozada attempts to work out various strategies that Latinos/as have employed to read biblical texts. He argues that Latino/a biblical interpretation is concerned with identity and belongingness with a goal of transforming/liberating the Latino/a community. Features An introduction to what it means to do Latino/a biblical interpretation A demonstration of three different reading strategies (correlation, dialogical, and ideological) that Latinos/as employ in reading biblical texts An exploration of whether one has to be Latino/a to do Latino/a biblical interpretation

We Are Left without a Father Here

Masculinity, Domesticity, and Migration in Postwar Puerto Rico

Author: Eileen J. Suárez Findlay

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822376113

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1958

We Are Left without a Father Here is a transnational history of working people's struggles and a gendered analysis of populism and colonialism in mid-twentieth-century Puerto Rico. At its core are the thousands of agricultural workers who, at the behest of the Puerto Rican government, migrated to Michigan in 1950 to work in the state's sugar beet fields. The men expected to earn enough income to finally become successful breadwinners and fathers. To their dismay, the men encountered abysmal working conditions and pay. The migrant workers in Michigan and their wives in Puerto Rico soon exploded in protest. Chronicling the protests, the surprising alliances that they created, and the Puerto Rican government's response, Eileen J. Suárez Findlay explains that notions of fatherhood and domesticity were central to Puerto Rican populist politics. Patriarchal ideals shaped citizens' understandings of themselves, their relationship to Puerto Rican leaders and the state, as well as the meanings they ascribed to U.S. colonialism. Findlay argues that the motivations and strategies for transnational labor migrations, colonial policies, and worker solidarities are all deeply gendered.

Linked Labor Histories

New England, Colombia, and the Making of a Global Working Class

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 082238891X

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 3413

Exploring globalization from a labor history perspective, Aviva Chomsky provides historically grounded analyses of migration, labor-management collaboration, and the mobility of capital. She illuminates the dynamics of these movements through case studies set mostly in New England and Colombia. Taken together, the case studies offer an intricate portrait of two regions, their industries and workers, and the myriad links between them over the long twentieth century, as well as a new way to conceptualize globalization as a long-term process. Chomsky examines labor and management at two early-twentieth-century Massachusetts factories: one that transformed the global textile industry by exporting looms around the world, and another that was the site of a model program of labor-management collaboration in the 1920s. She follows the path of the textile industry from New England, first to the U.S. South, and then to Puerto Rico, Japan, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and Colombia. She considers how towns in Rhode Island and Massachusetts began to import Colombian workers as they struggled to keep their remaining textile factories going. Most of the workers eventually landed in service jobs: cleaning houses, caring for elders, washing dishes. Focusing on Colombia between the 1960s and the present, Chomsky looks at the Urabá banana export region, where violence against organized labor has been particularly acute, and, through a discussion of the AFL-CIO’s activities in Colombia, she explores the thorny question of U.S. union involvement in foreign policy. In the 1980s, two U.S. coal mining companies began to shift their operations to Colombia, where they opened two of the largest open-pit coal mines in the world. Chomsky assesses how different groups, especially labor unions in both countries, were affected. Linked Labor Histories suggests that economic integration among regions often exacerbates regional inequalities rather than ameliorating them.

Imposing Decency

The Politics of Sexuality and Race in Puerto Rico, 1870-1920

Author: Eileen Findlay

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822323969

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 1225

The interrelationship between sexuality and national identity during Puerto Rico’s transition from Spanish to U.S. colonialism.

Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico, 1750-1856

Author: Sonya Lipsett-Rivera

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803240333

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 8786

History is not just about great personalities, wars, and revolutions; it is also about the subtle aspects of more ordinary matters. On a day-to-day basis the aspects of life that most preoccupied people in late eighteenth- through mid nineteenth-century Mexico were not the political machinations of generals or politicians but whether they themselves could make a living, whether others accorded them the respect they deserved, whether they were safe from an abusive husband, whether their wives and children would obey them—in short, the minutiae of daily life. Sonya Lipsett-Rivera’s Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico, 1750–1856 explores the relationships between Mexicans, their environment, and one another, as well as their negotiation of the cultural values of everyday life. By examining the value systems that governed Mexican thinking of the period, Lipsett-Rivera examines the ephemeral daily experiences and interactions of the people and illuminates how gender and honor systems governed these quotidian negotiations. Bodies and the built environment were inscribed with cultural values, and the relationship of Mexicans to and between space and bodies determined the way ordinary people acted out their culture.

Radical Moves

Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age

Author: Lara Putnam

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807838136

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 7702

In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing," writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.

Ambassadors of the Working Class

Argentina's International Labor Activists and Cold War Democracy in the Americas

Author: Ernesto Semán

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822372959

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 8615

In 1946 Juan Perón launched a populist challenge to the United States, recruiting an army of labor activists to serve as worker attachés at every Argentine embassy. By 1955, over five hundred would serve, representing the largest presence of blue-collar workers in the foreign service of any country in history. A meatpacking union leader taught striking workers in Chicago about rising salaries under Perón. A railroad motorist joined the revolution in Bolivia. A baker showed Soviet workers the daily caloric intake of their Argentine counterparts. As Ambassadors of the Working Class shows, the attachés' struggle against US diplomats in Latin America turned the region into a Cold War battlefield for the hearts of the working classes. In this context, Ernesto Semán reveals, for example, how the attachés' brand of transnational populism offered Fidel Castro and Che Guevara their last chance at mass politics before their embrace of revolutionary violence. Fiercely opposed by Washington, the attachés’ project foundered, but not before US policymakers used their opposition to Peronism to rehearse arguments against the New Deal's legacies.

Global Care Work

Gender and Migration in Nordic Societies

Author: Lise Widding Isaksen

Publisher: Nordic Academic Press

ISBN: 9185509485

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 4987

This is a unique study of gender and migration. Written by researchers from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, this anthology brings the Nordic example to the international debate on how globalisation affects and commercialises women's traditional work. The authors uncover some uncomfortable facts about new ethnic hierarchies, social class and gender discrimination in their countries. The Nordic societies have a long history of active policies on gender equality and social welfare for all. But today families can outsource' gender equality conflicts to the global market, and on a national level the authorities can use migration policy to adjust to the needs of the labour market. The authors present empirical research on the lives of care workers, sex workers and au pairs, their families, and the social and legal migration regulations. Global Care Work critically examines the effects of new migration patterns and globalisation on the egalitarian ideologies in the Nordic countries. The book makes essential reading for those interested in migration, care work and gender issues.

Harvesting Feminist Knowledge for Public Policy

Rebuilding Progress

Author: Devaki Jain,Diane Elson

Publisher: IDRC

ISBN: 8132107411

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 347

View: 8649

Harvesting Feminist Knowledge for Public Policy brings together 14 essays by feminist thinkers from different parts of the world, reflecting on the flaws in the current patterns of development and arguing for political, economic, and social changes to promote equality and sustainability. The contributors argue that the very approach being taken to understand and measure progress, and plan for and evaluate development, needs rethinking in ways that draw on the experiences and knowledge of women. All the essays, in diverse ways, offer proposals for alternative ideas to address the limitations and contradictions of currently dominant theories and practices in development, and move towards the creation of a socially just and egalitarian world.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674037649

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 3715

The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

The Location of Culture

Author: Homi K. Bhabha,Professor of English and African-American Literature Homi K Bhabha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136751041

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 7560

Rethinking questions of identity, social agency and national affiliation, Bhabha provides a working, if controversial, theory of cultural hybridity - one that goes far beyond previous attempts by others. In The Location of Culture, he uses concepts such as mimicry, interstice, hybridity, and liminality to argue that cultural production is always most productive where it is most ambivalent. Speaking in a voice that combines intellectual ease with the belief that theory itself can contribute to practical political change, Bhabha has become one of the leading post-colonial theorists of this era.

An Anthropology of Biomedicine

Author: Margaret Lock,Vinh-Kim Nguyen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119069130

Category: Medical

Page: 560

View: 6434

"Edition History: Margaret Lock and Vinh-Kim Nguyen (1e, 2010) published by Blackwell Ltd."--T.p. verso.

Cold War Encounters in US-Occupied Okinawa

Women, Militarized Domesticity, and Transnationalism in East Asia

Author: Mire Koikari

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316352226

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8794

In this innovative and engaging study, Mire Koikari recasts the US occupation of Okinawa as a startling example of Cold War cultural interaction in which women's grassroots activities involving homes and homemaking played a pivotal role in reshaping the contours of US and Japanese imperialisms. Drawing on insights from studies of gender, Asia, America and postcolonialism, Koikari analyzes how the occupation sparked domestic education movements in Okinawa, mobilizing an assortment of women - home economists, military wives, club women, university students and homemakers - from the US, Okinawa and mainland Japan. These women went on to pursue a series of activities to promote 'modern domesticity' and build 'multicultural friendship' amidst intense militarization on the islands. As these women took their commitment to domesticity and multiculturalism onto the larger terrain of the Pacific, they came to articulate the complex intertwinement of gender, race, domesticity, empire and transnationality that existed during the Cold War.

Living Across Worlds

Diaspora, Development and Transnational Engagement

Author: Ninna Nyberg Sørensen,International Organization for Migration

Publisher: United Nations Publications

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 211

View: 666

The research presented in this volume is based on case studies from around the world to examine how migration influences development. The studies reveal that it is seldom the simple act of migrating, but rather the conditions under which migration takes place that determine the developmental impact of migration. Rather than dwelling on normative discussions about whether migration should contribute to development, whether remittances should be put to more developmental uses, whether return should be promoted or whether development cooperation should engage in collaborative efforts with migrant and refugee diasporas, this study focuses on the questions policymakers and practitioners should consider when making background analyses for such decisions.

Gender & Pop Culture

A Text-Reader

Author: Adrienne Trier-Bieniek,Patricia Leavy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9789462095748

Category: Social Science

Page: 222

View: 4402

Gender & Pop Culture provides a foundation for the study of gender, pop culture and media. This comprehensive, interdisciplinary text provides text-book style introductory and concluding chapters written by the editors, seven original contributor chapters on key topics and written in a variety of writing styles, discussion questions, additional resources and more. Coverage includes: Foundations for studying gender & pop culture (history, theory, methods, key concepts) Contributor chapters on media and children, advertising, music, television, film, sports, and technology Ideas for activism and putting this book to use beyond the classroom Pedagogical Features Suggestions for further readings on topics covered and international studies of gender and pop culture Gender & Pop Culture was designed with students in mind, to promote reflection and lively discussion. With features found in both textbooks and anthologies, this sleek book can serve as primary or supplemental reading in undergraduate courses across the disciplines that deal with gender, pop culture or media studies. "An important addition to the fields of gender and media studies, this excellent compilation will be useful to students and teachers in a wide range of disciplines. The research is solid, the examples from popular culture are current and interesting, and the conclusions are original and illuminating. It is certain to stimulate self-reflection and lively discussion." Jean Kilbourne, Ed.D., author, feminist activist and creator of the Killing Us Softly: Advertising's Image of Women film series "An ideal teaching tool: the introduction is intellectually robust and orients the reader towards a productive engagement with the chapters; the contributions themselves are diverse and broad in terms of the subject matter covered; and the conclusion helps students take what they have learnt beyond the classroom. I can't wait to make use of it." Sut Jhally, Professor of Communication, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Founder & Executive Director, Media Education Foundation Adrienne Trier-Bieniek, Ph.D. is currently an assistant professor of sociology at Valencia College in Orlando, Florida. Her first book, Sing Us a Song, Piano Woman: Female Fans and the Music of Tori Amos (Scarecrow, 2013) addresses the ways women use music to heal after experiencing trauma. www.adriennetrier-bieniek.com Patricia Leavy, Ph.D. is an internationally known scholar and best-selling author, formerly associate professor of sociology and the founding director of gender studies at Stonehill College. She is the author of the acclaimed novels American Circumstance and Low-Fat Love and has published a dozen nonfiction books including Method Meets Art: Arts-Based Research Practice. www.patricialeavy.com

Women, Culture, and Politics in Latin America

Author: Seminar on Feminism & Culture in Latin America

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520909076

Category: Social Science

Page: 284

View: 6098

The result of a collaboration among eight women scholars, this collection examines the history of women’s participation in literary, journalistic, educational, and political activity in Latin American history, with special attention to the first half of this century.

Marginal Europe

The Contribution of Marginal Lands Since the Middle Ages

Author: Sidney Pollard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 327

View: 5205

The momentum of the British industrial revolution arose mostly in regions poorly endowed by nature, badly located and considered backward and poor by contemporaries. Sidney Pollard examines the initially surprising contribution made by the population of these and other `marginal areas' (mountains, forests and marshes) to the economic development of Europe since the Middle Ages. He provides case studies of periods in which marginal areas took the lead in economic development, such as theDutch economy in its Golden Age, and in the British industrial revolution. The traditional perception of the populations inhabiting these regions was that they were poor, backward, and intellectually inferior; but Sidney Pollard shows how they also had certain peculiar qualities which predisposed them to initiate progress. Healthy living, freedom, a martial spirit, and the hardiness to survive in harsh conditions enabled them to contribute a unique pioneering ability to pivotal economic periods; illustrating some of the effects of geography upon the development of societies.

Silencing Race

Disentangling Blackness, Colonialism, and National Identities in Puerto Rico

Author: Ileana M. Rodríguez-Silva

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 1137263210

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1154

In their quest for greater political participation within shifting imperial fields—from Spanish (1850s–1898) to US rule (1898-)—Puerto Ricans struggled to shape and contain conversations about race. In so doing, they crafted, negotiated, and imposed on others multiple forms of silences while reproducing the idea of a unified, racially mixed, harmonious nation. Hence, both upper and working classes participated, although with different agendas, in the construction of a wide array of silences that together have prevented serious debate about racialized domination. This book explores the ongoing, constant racialization of Puerto Rican workers to explore the 'class-making' of race.

Reshaping America

society and institutions, 1945-1960

Author: Robert Hamlett Bremner,Gary W. Reichard

Publisher: Ohio State Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 403

View: 5267