West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum Through Time

Author: Mark Davis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445632136

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 8218

During the eighteenth century the plight of those considered insane was dismal. Many were locked up in madhouses or chained in the workhouse, their illnesses ignored. It was only with the advent of the Industrial Revolution that reform came into place.

Voices from the Asylum

West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum

Author: Mark Davis,Marina Kidd,Niccola Swan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781445621739

Category: Mentally ill

Page: 96

View: 6292

Voices and stories from the patients of Menston Asylum

Asylum

Inside the Pauper Lunatic Asylums

Author: Mark Davis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445636425

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 6880

With the advent of care in the community for the mentally afflicted, the self-contained villages for the apparently insane have now been consigned to the history books. These once bustling Victorian institutions were commonly known in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as the county asylum or the pauper lunatic asylum , and were an accepted and essential part of society for nearly two centuries. It is difficult to believe that, in 1914, there were 102 such asylums, accommodating over 100,000 patients, the majority of whom lived their entire lives under care and treatment. In 2014, with the exception of those that have already been demolished, these buildings now lie empty and derelict, or have been converted for contemporary living. Through this photographic book, we journey into the inner sanctum of a world of lost dreams, where hope was more often than not unwillingly traded for an uncomfortable acceptance.

A Journey In Time Through Goosnargh, Whittingham & Inglewhite

Author: Janet Rigby

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 0244003599

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4408

With the redevelopment of Whittingham Hospital, which closed its doors thirty years ago, much has changed in Goosnargh and Whittingham. It is still of great interest historically, first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 and the ancient parish church of St, Mary's stands as it has done for centuries, flanked by the imposing Bushells Hospital, Grapes Inn and the school. Historic halls still hold their secrets of priest holes and private chapels, the place names of Button Street and Silk Mill Lane remind us of its once prosperous cottage industries. Looking back at Club days of the Friendly Society, Harvest Festivals, Royal Jubilees, bull baiting and gambling on Inglewhite Green, eccentric vicars, and much more which helps to build a picture of what life was like in the 19th century and beyond, Characters of Goosnargh in the past, including the first chronicler of Goosnargh, Richard Cookson who wrote Goosnargh Past and Present and the Goosnargh Rambler, which were an inspiration for this book.

The Ballroom

A Novel

Author: Anna Hope

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0812995163

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 8898

A searing novel of forbidden love on the Yorkshire moors—“a British version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (The Times U.K.)—from the author of the critically acclaimed debut Wake England, 1911. At Sharston Asylum, men and women are separated by thick walls and barred windows. But on Friday nights, they are allowed to mingle in the asylum’s magnificent ballroom. From its balconies and vaulted ceilings to its stained glass, the ballroom is a sanctuary. Onstage, the orchestra plays Strauss and Debussy while the patients twirl across the gleaming dance floor. Amid this heady ambience, John Mulligan and Ella Fay first meet. John is a sure-footed dancer with a clouded, secretive face; Ella is as skittish as a colt, with her knobby knees and flushed cheeks. Despite their grim circumstances, the unlikely pair strikes up a tenuous courtship. During the week, he writes letters smuggled to her in secret, unaware that Ella cannot read. She enlists a friend to read them aloud and gains resolve from the force of John’s words, each sentence a stirring incantation. And, of course, there’s always the promise of the ballroom. Then one of them receives an unexpected opportunity to leave Sharston for good. As Anna Hope’s powerful, bittersweet novel unfolds, John and Ella face an agonizing dilemma: whether to cling to familiar comforts or to confront a new world—living apart, yet forever changed. Praise for The Ballroom “The Ballroom successfully blends historical research with emotional intelligence to explore the tensions and trials of the human condition with grace and insight.”—New York Times Book Review “Part historical novel and part romance, The Ballroom paints an incredibly rich portrait of the mentally stable forced to live in an asylum. [Anna] Hope transports readers inside the asylum, to feel the thick humidity of the stale summer air of the day room, and the gritty and brutal reality inside those walls.”—Booklist “A compelling cast of emotionally resonant characters, as well as a bittersweet climax, render Hope’s second novel a powerful, memorable experience.”—Publishers Weekly “Hope’s writing is consistently beautiful. . . . Recommended for readers who enjoy historical fiction by Sarah Waters or Emma Donoghue.”—Library Journal “A beautifully wrought novel, a tender, heartbreaking and insightful exploration of the longings that survive in the most inhospitable environments.”—Sunday Express “The Ballroom has all the intensity and lyricism of [Anna] Hope’s debut, Wake. At its heart is a tender and absorbing love story.”—Daily Mail “Compelling and masterful . . . Anna Hope has proven once again that she is a luminary in historical fiction. . . . She delivers profound, poignant narratives that stir the emotions.”—Yorkshire Post “As with Hope’s highly acclaimed debut novel, Wake, the writing is elegant and insightful; she writes beautifully about human emotion, landscape and weather.”—The Observer “A brilliantly moving meditation on what it means to be ‘insane’ in a cruel world . . . All the characters are vividly and sensitively drawn. . . . Deeply moving.”—The Irish Times From the Hardcover edition.

Life in the Victorian Asylum

The World of Nineteenth Century Mental Health Care

Author: Mark Stevens

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473842387

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 540

Life in the Victorian Asylum reconstructs the lost world of the nineteenth century public asylums. This fresh take on the history of mental health reveals why county asylums were built, the sort of people they housed and the treatments they received, as well as the enduring legacy of these remarkable institutions. Mark Stevens, the best-selling author of Broadmoor Revealed, is a professional archivist and expert on asylum records. In this book, he delves into Victorian mental health archives to recreate the experience of entering an asylum and being treated there, perhaps for a lifetime. Praise for Broadmoor Revealed 'Superb,' Family Tree magazine 'Detailed and thoughtful,' Times Literary Supplement 'Paints a fascinating picture,' Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine

Broadmoor Revealed

Victorian Crime and the Lunatic Asylum

Author: Mark Stevens

Publisher: Seaforth

ISBN: 9781781593202

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 4120

The five volumes that constitute Arthur Marder's From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow represented arguably the finest contribution to the literature of naval history since Alfred Mahan. A J P Taylor wrote that 'his naval history has a unique fascination. To unrivalled mastery of sources he adds a gift of simple narrative . . . He is beyond praise, as he is beyond cavil.' The five volumes were subtitled The Royal Navy in the Fisher Era, 1904–1919 and they are still, despite recent major contributions from Robert Massie and Andrew Gordan, regarded by many as the definitive history of naval events leading up to and including the Great War. This first volume covers many facets of the history of the Royal Navy during the pre-war decade, including the economic and political background such as the 1906 Liberal Government hostility towards naval spending. Inevitably, however, attention moves to the German naval challenge, the arms race and the subsequent Anglo-German rivalry, and, finally, the British plans for the blockade of the German High Seas Fleet. A new introduction by Barry Gough, the distinguished Canadian maritime and naval historian, assesses the importance of Marder's work and anchors it firmly amongst the great naval narrative histories of this era. This new paperback edition will bring a truly great work to a new generation of historians and general readers.

The Ballroom

A Novel

Author: Anna Hope

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0812995163

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 7524

A searing novel of forbidden love on the Yorkshire moors—“a British version of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (The Times U.K.)—from the author of the critically acclaimed debut Wake England, 1911. At Sharston Asylum, men and women are separated by thick walls and barred windows. But on Friday nights, they are allowed to mingle in the asylum’s magnificent ballroom. From its balconies and vaulted ceilings to its stained glass, the ballroom is a sanctuary. Onstage, the orchestra plays Strauss and Debussy while the patients twirl across the gleaming dance floor. Amid this heady ambience, John Mulligan and Ella Fay first meet. John is a sure-footed dancer with a clouded, secretive face; Ella is as skittish as a colt, with her knobby knees and flushed cheeks. Despite their grim circumstances, the unlikely pair strikes up a tenuous courtship. During the week, he writes letters smuggled to her in secret, unaware that Ella cannot read. She enlists a friend to read them aloud and gains resolve from the force of John’s words, each sentence a stirring incantation. And, of course, there’s always the promise of the ballroom. Then one of them receives an unexpected opportunity to leave Sharston for good. As Anna Hope’s powerful, bittersweet novel unfolds, John and Ella face an agonizing dilemma: whether to cling to familiar comforts or to confront a new world—living apart, yet forever changed. Praise for The Ballroom “The Ballroom successfully blends historical research with emotional intelligence to explore the tensions and trials of the human condition with grace and insight.”—New York Times Book Review “Part historical novel and part romance, The Ballroom paints an incredibly rich portrait of the mentally stable forced to live in an asylum. [Anna] Hope transports readers inside the asylum, to feel the thick humidity of the stale summer air of the day room, and the gritty and brutal reality inside those walls.”—Booklist “A compelling cast of emotionally resonant characters, as well as a bittersweet climax, render Hope’s second novel a powerful, memorable experience.”—Publishers Weekly “Hope’s writing is consistently beautiful. . . . Recommended for readers who enjoy historical fiction by Sarah Waters or Emma Donoghue.”—Library Journal “A beautifully wrought novel, a tender, heartbreaking and insightful exploration of the longings that survive in the most inhospitable environments.”—Sunday Express “The Ballroom has all the intensity and lyricism of [Anna] Hope’s debut, Wake. At its heart is a tender and absorbing love story.”—Daily Mail “Compelling and masterful . . . Anna Hope has proven once again that she is a luminary in historical fiction. . . . She delivers profound, poignant narratives that stir the emotions.”—Yorkshire Post “As with Hope’s highly acclaimed debut novel, Wake, the writing is elegant and insightful; she writes beautifully about human emotion, landscape and weather.”—The Observer “A brilliantly moving meditation on what it means to be ‘insane’ in a cruel world . . . All the characters are vividly and sensitively drawn. . . . Deeply moving.”—The Irish Times From the Hardcover edition.

Fair Mile Hospital

A Victorian Asylum

Author: Ian Wheeler

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750964790

Category: Medical

Page: 192

View: 3219

Fair Mile was more than just a psychiatric hospital; it was an example of a nationwide network of "pauper lunatic asylums," born of responsible Victorian legislation and compassion for the disadvantaged. It was a secure home to many of its patients and staff, and the community within its walls became an integral part of Cholsey, touching almost every household in the area. Drawing on county records, first-hand accounts, and archive photographs, Fair Mile Hospital describes the ethos of the Victorian asylum builders and the development of the facility that treated thousands of patients over four generations. Relating changes in practice and personnel, and the difficulties of two world wars, this is a unique account of a hospital that did its utmost for those in its care.

The Victorian Asylum

Author: Sarah Rutherford

Publisher: Shire Publications

ISBN: 9780747806691

Category: History

Page: 56

View: 2020

The Victorian lunatic asylum has a special place in history. Dreaded and reviled by many, these nineteenth-century buildings provide a unique window on how the Victorians housed and treated the mentally ill. Despite initially good intentions, they became warehouses for society's outcasts at a time when cures were far fewer than hoped for. Isolated, hidden in the countryside and surrounded by high walls, they were eventually distributed throughout Britain, the Empire, the Continent and North America, with 120 or so in England and Wales alone. Now the memory of them is fading, and many of the buildings have gone or are threatened. Most have been closed as hospitals since the 1980s and either been demolished or turned into prestigious private apartments, their original use largely forgotten. Their memory deserves rehabilitation as a fascinating part of Victorian life that survived into modern times. In The Victorian Asylum, Sarah Rutherford gives an insight into their history, their often imposing architecture, and their later decline, and brings to life these haunting buildings, some of which still survive today.

Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots

A History of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland

Author: Kathryn Burtinshaw,John R F Burt

Publisher:

ISBN: 147387906X

Category: Medical

Page: 248

View: 2938

In the first half of the nineteenth century, treatment of the mentally ill in Britain and Ireland underwent radical change. No longer manacled, chained and treated like wild animals, patient care was defined in law and medical understanding, and treatment of insanity developed. Focusing on selected cases, this new study enables the reader to understand how progressively advancing attitudes and expectations affected decisions, leading to better legislation and medical practice throughout the century. Specific mental health conditions are discussed in detail and the treatments patients received are analysed in an expert way. A clear view of why institutional asylums were established, their ethos for the treatment of patients, and how they were run as palaces rather than prisons giving moral therapy to those affected becomes apparent. The changing ways in which patients were treated, and altered societal views to the incarceration of the mentally ill, are explored. The book is thoroughly illustrated and contains images of patients and asylum staff never previously published, as well as first-hand accounts of life in a nineteenth-century asylum from a patients perspective. Written for genealogists as well as historians, this book contains clear information concerning access to asylum records and other relevant primary sources and how to interpret their contents in a meaningful way.

Medicine and Society in Wakefield and Huddersfield 1780-1870

Author: Hilary Marland

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521325752

Category: History

Page: 503

View: 3602

This ambitious book presents an across-the-board study of medicine, in any urban centre, for any period of British history. By selecting Wakefield and Huddersfield as contrasting types of northern towns, and examining in details their systems of medical care, Dr Marland has written a local history that says something important about the country as a whole. Wakefield and Huddersfield contrasted in their economic demographic and social development during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, allowing an effective comparative analysis of medical facilities in the two communities. By drawing on diverse sources: from Poor Law and philanthropy to self-help organisations, fringe medicine and medical practice, the book places the development of medical services against the backdrop of the communities in which they evolved, their class structure, organization and social, civic and economic developments.

The Lives They Left Behind

Suitcases from a State Hospital Attic

Author: Darby Penney

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458765989

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 1283

More than four hundred abandoned suitcases filled with patients' belongings were found when Willard Psychiatric Center closed in 1995 after 125 years of operation. In this fully-illustrated social history, they are skillfully examined and compared to the written record to create a moving-and devastating-group portrait of twentieth-century American psychiatric care.

From My Heart

The Autobiography

Author: Linda Nolan

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509876367

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 1611

'While I don’t have any choice in how long I have to live, I do have a choice in how I spend the time I have. And I’ve chosen not to spend it constantly stressing about cancer. I’ve chosen to enjoy the little things. I’ve chosen to laugh. And I’ve chosen to look back on my life and thank God for it.' In March 2017, Linda Nolan was diagnosed with secondary breast cancer and was given the terrible news that, while it was treatable, it was not curable. Her first thought was to worry about her family, who were still grieving the loss of their sister Bernie. Her second was, ‘But I’m alive and I’m going to fight it.’ In From My Heart, Linda writes honestly about growing up in her big Irish family and finding fame with her sisters in The Nolans and reveals the shocking family secrets and feuds that threatened to tear them apart. She also describes her original battle with breast cancer and how the death of her husband left her deeply depressed, to the point of feeling suicidal. Just as she’d learned to embrace life again, and even to start dating, the cancer came back . . . In this warm, brave and funny memoir, Linda shows that it’s never too late to learn what really matters.

A Treatise on the Nature, Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment of Insanity

With Practical Observations on Lunatic Asylums, and a Description of the Pauper Lunatic Asylum for the County of Middlesex, at Hanwell, with a Detailed Account of Its Management

Author: Sir William Charles Ellis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Insanity (Law)

Page: 344

View: 8319

London

Author: Richard Platt,Manuela Cappon

Publisher: Kingfisher

ISBN: 9780753431061

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 45

View: 9892

A sumptuous recreation London's story: publishing to coincide with the 2012 Olympic Games. Through Time: London follows the story of the historic capital, from its Celtic origins right up to the present - including the settlement of the Romans, the Anglo-Saoxon era, the Viking invasion, and the growth of medieval London in Norman times. The book exlplores major events in London's history, such as the Great Plague, the Blitz and preparations for the 2012 Olympic Games.

Bradford Through Time

Author: Mark Davis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445627051

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 5161

Presumed Curable

An Illustrated Casebook of Victorian Psychiatric Patients in Bethlem Hospital

Author: Colin Gale,Robert Howard

Publisher: Wrightson Biomedical Pub Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: Psychology

Page: 128

View: 9123

Preface; The study of the history of medicine, and especially that of psychiatry, often induces in the modern reader an understandable sense of relief that he or she is living in today's world, and not at any point in the past. Yet the stories of the patients in this book, representatives of many hundreds admitted to Bethlem Hospital in the late Victorian period, will resonate with all who take an interest in mental health care today. In these early years of our own twenty-first century, the fear and stigma associated with major mental illness remain strong. Psychiatrists and professionals in allied disciplines involved in the care and treatment of people with mental health problems still face disorders of uncertain aetiology that devastate the lives of sufferers and their families and for which there are no 'cures'. The advent of effective treatments for mood disorders and the symptoms of psychosis, some fifty years after the events detailed in this book, did of course result in tremendous improvements in prognosis and the alleviation of suffering. The nineteenth-century casebooks of Bethlem Hospital give relatively little information about the physical and chemical treatments app