Daily News, Eternal Stories

The Mythological Role of Journalism

Author: Jack Lule

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 9781572306066

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 244

View: 5920

This compelling, often surprising book demonstrates the ways news articles of today draw from age-old tales that have chastened, challenged, entertained, and entranced people since the beginning of time. Through an insightful exploration of hundreds of New York Times articles, award-winning professor and former journalist Jack Lule reveals mythical themes in reporting on topics from terrorist hijackings to Huey Newton, from Mother Teresa to Mike Tyson. Beneath the fresh facade of current events, Lule identifies such enduring archetypes as the innocent victim, the good mother, the hero, and the trickster. In doing so, he sheds light on how media coverage shapes our thinking about many of the confounding issues of our day, including foreign policy, terrorism, race relations, and political dissent.

Radical Theatrics

Put-Ons, Politics, and the Sixties

Author: Craig J. Peariso

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295805579

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 8222

From burning draft cards to staging nude protests, much left-wing political activism in 1960s America was distinguished by deliberate outrageousness. This theatrical activism, aimed at the mass media and practiced by Abbie Hoffman and the Yippies, the Black Panthers, and the Gay Activists Alliance, among others, is often dismissed as naive and out of touch, or criticized for tactics condemned as silly and off-putting to the general public. In Radical Theatrics, however, Craig Peariso argues that these over-the-top antics were far more than just the spontaneous actions of a self-indulgent radical impulse. Instead, he shows, they were well-considered aesthetic and political responses to a jaded cultural climate in which an unreflective “tolerance” masked an unwillingness to engage with challenging ideas. Through innovative analysis that links political protest to the art of contemporaries such as Andy Warhol, Peariso reveals how the “put-on” — the signature activist performance of the radical left — ended up becoming a valuable American political practice, one that continues to influence contemporary radical movements such as Occupy Wall Street.

The SAGE Handbook of Political Communication

Author: Holli A Semetko,Margaret Scammell

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1446265986

Category: Political Science

Page: 544

View: 3130

This authoritative and comprehensive survey of political communication draws together a team of the world's leading scholars to provide a state-of-the-art review that sets the agenda for future study. It is divided into five sections: Part One: explores the macro-level influences on political communication such as the media industry, new media, technology, and political systems Part Two: takes a grassroots perspective of the influences of social networks - real and online - on political communication Part Three: discusses methodological advances in political communication research Part Four: focuses on power and how it is conceptualized in political communication Part Five: provides an international, regional, and comparative understanding of political communication in its various contexts The SAGE Handbook of Political Communication is an essential benchmark publication for advanced students, researchers and practitioners in the fields of politics, media and communication, sociology and research methods.

Journalism in the Movies

Author: Matthew C. Ehrlich

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252091086

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 6106

Now in paperback, Matthew C. Ehrlich’s Journalism in the Movies is the story of Hollywood’s depiction of American journalism from the start of the sound era to the present. Ehrlich argues that films have relentlessly played off the image of the journalist as someone who sees through lies and hypocrisy, sticks up for the little guy, and serves democracy. Focusing on films about key figures and events in journalism, including Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, All the President’s Men, and The Insider, Journalism in the Movies presents a unique opportunity to reflect on how movies relate not only to journalism but also American life and democracy.

The American Rhetorical Construction of the Iranian Nuclear Threat

Author: Jason Jones

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441119523

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 9166

Jason Jones analyzes the rhetorical construction of the Iranian nuclear threat during the Bush presidency, and US/Iran relations more generally.

Communications

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Communication

Page: N.A

View: 9057

Global Media Go to War

Role of News and Entertainment Media During the 2003 Iraq War

Author: Ralph D. Berenger

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 382

View: 1979

This book contains 45 essays from more than 60 mass media scholars around the world. It is the most comprehensive analysis available of the media's role in the 2003 Iraq war. The book is ideal for use in communication, political science and sociological courses on media and politics.

Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

View: 8606

Journalism in a Culture of Grief

Author: Carolyn L. Kitch,Janice Hume

Publisher: Taylor & Francis US

ISBN: 9780415980104

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 247

View: 2388

This book considers the cultural meanings of death in American journalism and the role of journalism in interpretations and enactments of public grief, which has returned to an almost Victorian level. A number of researchers have begun to address this growing collective preoccupation with death in modern life; few scholars, however, have studied the central forum for the conveyance and construction of public grief today: news media. News reports about death have a powerful impact and cultural authority because they bring emotional immediacy to matters of fact, telling stories of real people who die in real circumstances and real people who mourn them. Moreover, through news media, a broader audience mourns along with the central characters in those stories, and, in turn, news media cover the extended rituals. Journalism in a Culture of Grief examines this process through a range of types of death and types of news media. It discusses the reporting of horrific events such as September 11 and Hurricane Katrina; it considers the cultural role of obituaries and the instructive work of coverage of teens killed due to their own risky behaviors; and it assesses the role of news media in conducting national, patriotic memorial rituals.