Lawyering for the Railroad

Business, Law, and Power in the New South

Author: William G. Thomas

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807125045

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 3491

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Lawyering for the Railroad provides the first full account of railroad monopoly power, tracing its sources and effects in the southern political economy. Issues touching on railroad development were major components of politics in the days of both Populism and Progressivism, and railroad attorneys -- often in their role as lobbyists -- were always in the middle of the action. They distributed free passes to legislators, retained the best counsel for their clients, laid out the legal agreements to form monopolies, and instituted practices to ensure quick and favorable settlements for the railroads. In this intriguing work, William G. Thomas introduces the southern attorneys who represented railroads between 1880 and 1916, closely examining their role in the political economy of the South during the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, a period in which the region experienced sharp change, explosive growth, and heated political contests. Thomas tells his fascinating story with legal department records from some of the largest interstate railroad companies in the South. With the help of these records, he demonstrates how the railroads tried to use the law and the legal process to mold the southern political economy to their ends and what kind of opposition they faced. Standing at the crossroads of business, law, and politics, Lawyering for the Railroad gives context, depth, and specificity to what have been cursory glimpses into the shady world of corporate power in the Gilded Age. From small-town lawyers to big-city firms, the story of the railroad attorneys brings into focus the many ways the interstate railroad transformed the South.

Heroes, Rascals, and the Law

Constitutional Encounters in Mississippi History

Author: James L. Robertson

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496819950

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 9923

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James L. Robertson focuses on folk encountering their constitutions and laws, in their courthouses and country stores, and in their daily lives, animating otherwise dry and inaccessible parchments. Robertson begins at statehood and continues through war and depression, well into the 1940s. He tells of slaves petitioning for freedom, populist sentiments fueling abnegation of the rule of law, the state's many schemes for enticing Yankee capital to lift a people from poverty, and its sometimes tragic, always colorful romance with whiskey after the demise of national Prohibition. Each story is sprinkled with fascinating but heretofore unearthed facts and circumstances. Robertson delves into the prejudices and practices of the times, local landscapes, and daily life and its dependence on our social compact. He offers the unique perspective of a judge, lawyer, scholar, and history buff, each role having tempered the lessons of the others. He focuses on a people, enriching encounters most know little about. Tales of understanding and humanity covering 130 years of heroes, rascals, and ordinary folk--with a bundle of engaging surprises--leave the reader pretty sure there's nothing quite like Mississippi history told by a sage observer.

Southern Cultures

Volume 20: Number 2 – Summer 2014 Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615940

Category: History

Page: 120

View: 9377

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Southern Cultures Volume 20: Number 1 – Summer 2014 Table of Contents Front Porch by Jocelyn R. Neal "One of the challenges—and, simultaneously, deep pleasures—of studying the South is that the disciplinary walls of the academy neither contain nor constrain the work." Rewriting Elizabeth A Life Lost (and Found) in the Annals of Bryce Mental Hospital by Lindsay Byron "Her name was never to be spoken. Even upon the lips and within the hearts of her own children, remembrance was forbidden. Silence nearly erased her from history." Ghosts, Wreckers, and Rotten Ties The 1891 Train Wreck at Bostian's Bridge by Scott Huffard "When train number nine on the Western North Carolina Railroad tumbled off Bostian's Bridge in 1891, it ignited a media frenzy, as well as a firestorm of outrage, a detailed investigation, a compelling mystery, and a series of unanswered questions." Photo Essay Teenage Pastime by Natalie Minik "When the unlimited energy of adolescence comes to bear on the limited experience of childhood, the results often swing toward one of two poles—an enthusiastic confirmation of the culture a child grew into or a bold rejection of the culture they grew out of." "The Best Notes Made the Most Votes" W. C. Handy, E. H. Crump, and Black Music as Politics by Mark A. Johnson "'Feet commenced to pat. A moment later there was dancing on the sidewalks below. Hands went into the air, bodies swayed like the reeds on the banks of the Congo.'" Taking Strong Drink by Bill Koon "Some devout Baptists complained that there was too much booze in a mini bottle for one drink; the rest of us complained that there wasn't enough." South Polls Partisan Change in Southern State Legislatures, 1953–2013 by Christopher A. Cooper and H. Gibbs Knotts "At mid-century, the South had no Republican senators and only two Republicans in the 105-person southern House delegation. By 2000, [both] delegations were majority Republican." Beyond Grits and Gravy Maggie and Buck Coal Camps, Cabbage Rolls, and Community in Appalachia by Donna Tolley Corriher "Maggie's neighbor-women saw a young woman just like themselves, with children to feed, trying to build a life, and so they helped her, unquestioning in recognition that she would help them in return. This was so." Not Forgotten Winning Friends and Influencing Dead People by JL Strickland "Joe cackled fiendishly, addressing Vernon through the closed lid. 'Who's got the last laugh now, big boy?'" Mason–Dixon Lines Apple Slices poetry by Todd Boss ". . . flavored of tin from the lip of the cup of a dented thermos passed between us—" Books Elaine Neil Orr A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa reviewed by Fred Hobson Jennifer Rae Greeson Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature reviewed by Michael McCollum Angela C. Halfacre A Delicate Balance: Constructing a Conservation Culture in the South Carolina Lowcountry reviewed by Brian Grabbatin About the Contributors

Special Issue: Law Firms, Legal Culture and Legal Practice

Law Firms, Legal Culture, and Legal Practice

Author: Austin Sarat

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 0857243586

Category: Law

Page: 248

View: 2203

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Large law firms have become a dominant feature of the legal landscape in the United States and elsewhere. This volume of Studies in Law, Politics, and Society examines the situation of large law firms.

Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 087140785X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3384

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The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

The Ordeal of the Reunion

A New History of Reconstruction

Author: Mark Wahlgren Summers

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469617587

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 2469

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For a generation, scholarship on the Reconstruction era has rightly focused on the struggles of the recently emancipated for a meaningful freedom and defined its success or failure largely in those terms. In The Ordeal of the Reunion, Mark Wahlgren Summers goes beyond this vitally important question, focusing on Reconstruction's need to form an enduring Union without sacrificing the framework of federalism and republican democracy. Assessing the era nationally, Summers emphasizes the variety of conservative strains that confined the scope of change, highlights the war's impact and its aftermath, and brings the West and foreign policy into an integrated narrative. In sum, this book offers a fresh explanation for Reconstruction's demise and a case for its essential successes as well as its great failures. Indeed, this book demonstrates the extent to which the victors' aims in 1865 were met--and at what cost. Summers depicts not just a heroic, tragic moment with equal rights advanced and then betrayed but a time of achievement and consolidation, in which nationhood and emancipation were placed beyond repeal and the groundwork was laid for a stronger, if not better, America to come.

The Creation of American Common Law, 1850–1880

Technology, Politics, and the Construction of Citizenship

Author: Howard Schweber

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139449946

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 5367

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This book is a comparative study of the American legal development in the mid-nineteenth century. Focusing on Illinois and Virginia, supported by observations from six additional states, the book traces the crucial formative moment in the development of an American system of common law in northern and southern courts. The process of legal development, and the form the basic analytical categories of American law came to have, are explained as the products of different responses to the challenge of new industrial technologies, particularly railroads. The nature of those responses was dictated by the ideologies that accompanied the social, political, and economic orders of the two regions. American common law, ultimately, is found to express an emerging model of citizenship, appropriate to modern conditions. As a result, the process of legal development provides an illuminating perspective on the character of American political thought in a formative period of the nation.