Poverty Policy And Poverty Research

Author: Robert H. Haveman

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299111540

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 307

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The War on Poverty, instituted in 1965 during the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson, was one of the chief elements of that president s Great Society initiative. This book describes and assesses the major social science research effort that grew up with, and in part because of, these programs. Robert H. Haveman s objective is to illuminate the process by which social and political developments have an impact on the direction of progress in the social sciences. Haveman identifies the policy measures most closely tied to the War on Poverty and the Great Society and describes the nature of these policies and their growth from 1965 to 1980. He examines the extent and growth of resources devoted to the poverty-related research that accompanied these programs, and assesses the impact of the growth in this research commitment over the 1965 1980 period. Haveman s was the first full overview of recent poverty-related research and an overview of methodological developments in the social sciences in the post-1965 period which were stimulated by the antipoverty effort. "

Public Values, Private Lands

Farmland Preservation Policy, 1933-1985

Author: Tim Lehman

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807821770

Category: Nature

Page: 239

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Tim Lehman examines the political battles over public policies to protect farmland from urban sprawl. His detailed account clarifies three larger themes: the ongoing struggle over land use planning in this country, the emerging environmental critique of m

Five million children

a statistical profile of our poorest young citizens

Author: Columbia University. National Center for Children in Poverty

Publisher: Natl Center for Children

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 96

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This document presents, for the first time in one volume, a comprehensive view of the five million children under six who live in poverty in the United States. It reports on who these children are - nearly one out of four of all U. S. children under six - & where they live; their ethnic & racial diversity; the structure of their families; their parents' education & employment status; & their sources of financial support. The report replaces a 'monolithic' view of poverty with a multifaceted portrait of children living in many diverse situations. Conclusions for policy & program implementation appear in Chapter Four. Information for the 96-page text, which includes 31 figures & tables, was derived from U. S. Census Bureau surveys & other sources. Cost: $9.95 plus $3 postage-handling. Checks for $12.95 should be mailed to the publisher. (Notice to bookstores & book distributors: This is a nonprofit press; all orders must be paid in full. No returns).

The Undeserving Poor

America's Enduring Confrontation with Poverty: Fully Updated and Revised

Author: Michael B. Katz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199933952

Category: History

Page: 353

View: 2012

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The Undeserving Poor is a history of the ideas that underlie America's enduring confrontation with poverty. The book shows that poverty remains a national disgrace in part because of the way we define and think about it - which, in turn, shapes the energy we put, or don't put, into its eradication.

Urban Poverty, Political Participation, and the State

Lima, 1970–1990

Author: Henry Dietz

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 9780822971931

Category: Political Science

Page: 396

View: 2046

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Urban Poverty, Political Participation, and the State offers an unparalleled longitudinal view of how the urban poor saw themselves and their neighborhoods and how they behaved and organized to provide their neighborhoods with basic goods and services. Grounding research on theoretical notions from Albert Hirschman and an analytical framework from Verba and Nie, Dietz produces findings that hold great interest for comparativists and students of political behavior in general.

Poverty Knowledge

Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History

Author: Alice O'Connor

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400824745

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 7793

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Progressive-era "poverty warriors" cast poverty in America as a problem of unemployment, low wages, labor exploitation, and political disfranchisement. In the 1990s, policy specialists made "dependency" the issue and crafted incentives to get people off welfare. Poverty Knowledge gives the first comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem," in a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy. Alice O'Connor chronicles a transformation in the study of poverty, from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to a detached, highly technical analysis of the demographic and behavioral characteristics of the poor. Along the way, she uncovers the origins of several controversial concepts, including the "culture of poverty" and the "underclass." She shows how such notions emerged not only from trends within the social sciences, but from the central preoccupations of twentieth-century American liberalism: economic growth, the Cold War against communism, the changing fortunes of the welfare state, and the enduring racial divide. The book details important changes in the politics and organization as well as the substance of poverty knowledge. Tracing the genesis of a still-thriving poverty research industry from its roots in the War on Poverty, it demonstrates how research agendas were subsequently influenced by an emerging obsession with welfare reform. Over the course of the twentieth century, O'Connor shows, the study of poverty became more about altering individual behavior and less about addressing structural inequality. The consequences of this steady narrowing of focus came to the fore in the 1990s, when the nation's leading poverty experts helped to end "welfare as we know it." O'Connor shows just how far they had traveled from their field's original aims.

Wealth and the Wealthy

Exploring and Tackling Inequalities Between Rich and Poor

Author: Karen Rowlingson,Stephen McKay

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1847423078

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 255

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Using many data sources, this timely book provides a comprehensive discussion of issues of wealth, looking at potential policy responses, including 'asset-based' welfare and taxation.

Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights

Author: Diana Tietjens Meyers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199396906

Category: Philosophy

Page: 336

View: 978

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Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights collects thirteen new essays that analyze how human agency relates to poverty and human rights respectively as well as how agency mediates issues concerning poverty and social and economic human rights. No other collection of philosophical papers focuses on the diverse ways poverty impacts the agency of the poor, the reasons why poverty alleviation schemes should also promote the agency of beneficiaries, and the fitness of the human rights regime to secure both economic development and free agency. The book is divided into four parts. Part 1 considers the diverse meanings of poverty both from the standpoint of the poor and from that of the relatively well-off. Part 2 examines morally appropriate responses to poverty on the part of persons who are better-off and powerful institutions. Part 3 identifies economic development strategies that secure the agency of the beneficiaries. Part 4 addresses the constraints poverty imposes on agency in the context of biomedical research, migration for work, and trafficking in persons.