The Sociology of Early Buddhism

Author: Greg Bailey,Ian Mabbett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139438902

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 9613

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Early Buddhism flourished because it was able to take up the challenge represented by buoyant economic conditions and the need for cultural uniformity in the newly emergent states in north-eastern India from the fifth century BCE onwards. This book begins with the apparent inconsistency of Buddhism, a renunciant movement, surviving within a strong urban environment, and draws out the implications of this. In spite of the Buddhist ascetic imperative, the Buddha and other celebrated monks moved easily through various levels of society and fitted into the urban landscape they inhabited. The Sociology of Early Buddhism tells how and why the early monks were able to exploit the social and political conditions of mid-first millennium north-eastern India in such a way as to ensure the growth of Buddhism into a major world religion. Its readership lies both within Buddhist studies and more widely among historians, sociologists and anthropologists of religion.

American Sociology of Religion

Histories

Author: Anthony J. Blasi

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004161155

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 2809

DOWNLOAD NOW »

First ever collection of histories of American sociology of religion, including accounts of early dissertations changes in theory, and studies of denominations, globalization, feminism, new religions and Latino/a American religion.

The Religion of India

The Sociology of Hinduism and Buddhism

Author: Max Weber

Publisher: Munshirm Manoharlal Pub Pvt Limited

ISBN: 9788121505710

Category: Religion

Page: 392

View: 5580

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Classic on the connection between religious institutions and administration, bureaucracy.

The Sociology of Philosophies

A Global Theory of Intellectual Change

Author: Randall COLLINS

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674967569

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1118

View: 3754

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Randall Collins traces the movement of philosophical thought in ancient Greece, China, Japan, India, the medieval Islamic and Jewish world, medieval Christendom, and modern Europe. What emerges from this history is a social theory of intellectual change, one that avoids both the reduction of ideas to the influences of society at large and the purely contingent local construction of meanings. Instead, Collins focuses on the social locations where sophisticated ideas are formed: the patterns of intellectual networks and their inner divisions and conflicts.

Early Buddhist Architecture in Context

The Great Stūpa at Amarāvatī (ca. 300 BCE-300 CE)

Author: Akira Shimada

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004233261

Category: Religion

Page: 332

View: 6943

DOWNLOAD NOW »

The book provides an updated chronology of the Amar?vat? st?pa and argues its close link with the long-term development of urbanization of this region between ca. 200 BCE-250 CE based on the latest archaeological, art-historical and epigraphic evidence.

Early Buddhist Transmission and Trade Networks

Mobility and Exchange Within and Beyond the Northwestern Borderlands of South Asia

Author: Jason Neelis

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004181598

Category: History

Page: 371

View: 2010

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This book examines catalysts for Buddhist formation in ancient South Asia and expansion throughout and beyond the northwestern Indian subcontinent to Central Asia by investigating symbiotic relationships between networks of religious mobility and trade.

Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road

Author: Johan Elverskog

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205316

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 755

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In the contemporary world the meeting of Buddhism and Islam is most often imagined as one of violent confrontation. Indeed, the Taliban's destruction of the Bamiyan Buddhas in 2001 seemed not only to reenact the infamous Muslim destruction of Nalanda monastery in the thirteenth century but also to reaffirm the stereotypes of Buddhism as a peaceful, rational philosophy and Islam as an inherently violent and irrational religion. But if Buddhist-Muslim history was simply repeated instances of Muslim militants attacking representations of the Buddha, how had the Bamiyan Buddha statues survived thirteen hundred years of Muslim rule? Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road demonstrates that the history of Buddhist-Muslim interaction is much richer and more complex than many assume. This groundbreaking book covers Inner Asia from the eighth century through the Mongol empire and to the end of the Qing dynasty in the late nineteenth century. By exploring the meetings between Buddhists and Muslims along the Silk Road from Iran to China over more than a millennium, Johan Elverskog reveals that this long encounter was actually one of profound cross-cultural exchange in which two religious traditions were not only enriched but transformed in many ways.